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Chicago: Its History 
and Its Builders 

A CENTURY OF MARVELOUS GROWTH 



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BY 



J. SEYMOUR CURREY 

Honorary Vice President Illinois State Historical Society, Vice Presi- 
dent Cook County Historical Society, Member Chicago Histori- 
cal Society, American Historical Association, Illinois 
State Library Association, National Geograph- 
ical Society, Chicago Geographic Society. 




ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME IV 



1918 

THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING COMPANY 

CHICAGO 



THE NEW YORK 

■ PUBLIC LIBIlAftY 

1 9254015 

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TILDEN FOUNUAXIOiNS 

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BIOGRAPHICAL 



MARSHALL FIELD. 



To say that Marshall Field was the greatest merchant of his day is to proclaim 
that he was the most eminent merchant prince in the world's history ; and both 
statements are true to the letter. In his boyhood he was noted for both industry 
and perseverance, and, carrying the same preeminent traits into his mature life, 
he came to tower above his fellow merchants of the great working world. He pene- 
trated to the possibilities of men and business situations with lightning-like rapidity; 
the intellectual sweep with which he finally organized a magnificent mercantile house 
whose scope embraced both the old world and the new, proclaimed the man of vast 
power, as well as penetration, and the unfailing courtesy and superb endurance of 
the man carried all before him. The old-time merchants of the Stewart school 
had these qualities of polished granite, but Marshall Field added to them a world- 
view, and also the application of artistic genius to mercantile affairs and environ- 
ment. He not only sold goods honestly and gave the people promptly what they 
wanted, but he educated their tastes, showed them beautiful and new creations for 
their persons and their homes, and then met their advanced and more refined wants 
at as reasonable a cost as was compatible with honest goods and fair profits. 

And when Marshall Field had personally progressed from the station of a raw 
clerk from the country districts of New England to a world-wide eminence in the 
field of mastery, he was still a modest, unassuming man. "There have been men," 
said a local journal on January 17, 1906, (the day after his death), "whom wealth 
has made purse proud, arrogant, offensive to their equals and tyrants to their 
employes. We are glad to say that Marshall Field was not one of them. Riches did 
not change his manners. He was never aggressive or pompous. There was in him 
no show of self-conceit in manner or speech. He was reticent, but it was the 
reticence of modesty, not of pride. His employes were attached to him. He treated 
them with the courtesy he extended to everybody. He was as quiet or reserved, and 
as unostentatious, when he was worth a hundred millions as when he was worth a 
thousandth part of that. He attended strictly to his own business, which he under- 
stood perfectly, and did not meddle with that of others. He did not set himself up 
as the general instructor of the community. He asked people to let him alone as 
regarded the just conduct of his afi'airs, and he conceded to others the right he 
proclaimed for himself. 

"There was no man in Chicago more kindly regarded by his fellow citizens than 
Mr. Field. There was no one so conspicuous of whom so few harsh things were 
said. His riches made him odious to no one, for the people high and low saw that 
he was untainted by wealth, and was always an upright man, fair and even generous 
in his dealings. He was the first citizen of Chicago when he died, and he has left 
no one to take his place. He will be sincerely mourned by the men, women and 
children of Chicago." 

5 



14 



6 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

In explanation of his lifelong inclination to keep himself in the background, 
Marshall Field always said frankly that he preferred to work where he could do 
the most good, which in his case he claimed was remote from public platforms and 
showy places. When counsel was asked of him, however, either as a member of 
society or as a citizen of Chicago, he gave it with exceptional power and insight, 
couching his arguments and his conclusions in straightforward forcible language. 
As a citizen he was ever ready to express an opinion, if he felt that it was wanted 
and would be useful, and not long before his death he analyzed Chicago's financial 
condition in a masterly manner, pointing out that many of its ills of dirt, decay of 
public improvements, bad water and imperfect drainage were due to lack of busi- 
nesslike handing of available funds. 

Mr. Field's self-poised momentum as a merchant and a man was an especial 
inspiration to young men, and, without assuming to be a teacher of moral, and even 
business laws, within the later jjeriod of his life he wrote a number of brief and 
pithv essays for their consideration, advising them of the value of economy, honesty 
and industry. The practical suggestion set forth may be summarized as follows : 
Never give a note. Never buy a share of stock on margin. Never borrow. Never 
give a mortgage on your holdings. Hold all customers to a strict meeting of their 
obligations. Do business on a cash basis. Give the best quality for the least money. 
Sell on shorter time than competitors. Try to sell the same grade of goods for a 
smaller price. Never speculate. 

Mr. Field enjoyed the personal advantage that his physical appearance was in 
perfect keeping with his high and substantial character. Many noble men and 
women suffer a serious drawback through life because of physical characteristics 
which seem a brutal contradiction of the real soul of their being. But Marshall 
Field was both distinguished and genial in ajDpearance, and all his features were 
strong and large. With white hair and mustache, high and broad forehead, and 
calm yet penetrating gray blue eyes shadowed by heavy brows, he was a man of 
marked bearing who at once commanded attention and respect. 

This superb personality originated and was nurtured near the little village of 
Conway, Massachusetts, the year of Marshall Field's birth being 183i. In this 
locality his English ancestors settled in 1650. The family homestead was about one 
mile and a half from town, on the summit of a considerable elevation, which had 
long been known as Field's Hill. Forest-clad hills were all around, and the pano- 
ramic view of meadows, brooks, nesting farms and villages, was something to 
soothe the mind for years after, in the smoke and bustle of great cities. Amid such 
surroundings were born and reared the four sons and two daughters comprising the 
Field family, Marshall being the third child and son. When he was six years of 
age he commenced to attend winter school, and within the next few years assumed 
the lead in such out-door sports as "Fox and Hound," which called for both speed 
and endurance. It is a matter of record that Marshall was usually the fox, that 
position requiring ingenuity as well, and old settlers who were boys in the days of 
his residence recall a famous run of twenty miles to South Deer field and return, in 
which the fox finally came home untouched and unwinded. Ingenuity, speed and 
endurance; that was Marshall Field — the boy, father to the man. On account of 
the abandonment of the old road which ran past the homestead and lowered the 
price of the property, the home farm was sold when ISIarshall was about fifteen years 
of age, and, although another was purchased, it was decided that the third son was 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 7 

better fitted for a store clerk than for an agriculturist. It is said that his mates 
fully subscribed to this decision complaining that the_y had no cliance to knife trade 
when Marshall was in the ring. After serving a short apprenticeship in a store at 
Pittsfield, which served to whet his ambition for a larger fields he decided in favor 
of the great undeveloped west. 

Mr. P'ield became a resident of Chicago in 1856, so that the fifty years inter- 
vening between his majority and his death he devoted to the development of his 
house, his character and the upholding of the city's name for mercantile, commercial 
and civic honor. At the time of his arrival in the Avestern city Cooley, Wadsworth 
& Company were proprietors of its leading dry-goods house. The population was 
estimated anywhere from sixt}^ thousand inhabitants, which then seemed an empire 
of people to the young Massachusetts man. Although then unformed to city ways, 
when he said simply and firmly to the "boss" that he was a good clerk and could 
sell goods there was that about him which carried conviction ; he was therefore 
engaged and in today's vernacular "made good." In January, 1860, he was admitted 
to the partnership and appointed manager of the business, then conducted as Cooley, 
Farwell & Company but after his association, as Farwell, Field & Company. In 
1860 Levi Z. Leiter also entered the firm, and in January, I860, Potter Palmer 
(who already had been in business for thirty years) approached Messrs. Field and 
Leiter with the proposition to buy his dry-goods house, that he might retire and 
recuperate his broken health. Mr. Palmer's offer of part cash and notes for the 
balance was accepted, and the firm of Field, Palmer & Leiter, which was formed 
January 11, 1865 transacted a flourishing business until 1867, when the notes 
were paid and Mr. Palmer's name dropped from the style. 

The firm of Field, Leiter & Company was formed in January, 1867, and the 
following September their business was installed in a large building erected by Mr. 
Palmer on the northeast corner of State and Washington streets. For four years 
and one month this was the grand center of the dry-goods trade of the northwest, 
and at the time of the fire of 1871 their sales had reached the aggregate of eight 
million dollars. But the fire swept away the business entailing a destruction of 
three million five hundred thousand dollars worth of property, with an insurance of 
two million five hundred thousand dollars. Before the ruins had ceased to smoke, 
temporary headquarters were established in the old street car barns, at the corner of 
State and Twentieth street and the business was there conducted until anotlier 
store was completed on the old site in 1873. Meantime a building had been erected 
on the corner of Market and Madison streets, and a portion of it occupied for retail 
purposes and known as Retail No. 2, for the benefit of patrons coming from the west 
and north sides of the city. With the completion of the State street store in 1873, 
the retail was separated from the wholesale business and transferred altogether to 
the State street concern. Fire again visited Marshall Field's State street store in 
1877, the loss being seven hundred and twenty- five thousand dollars, but it was 
reopened in the following year, the business having in the meantime been carried 
on in temporary quarters. So the development of the gigantic enterprise continued 
apace, its intricate and powerful machinery hidden from the public, by its continu- 
ous expansion indicated by the occupation of new space from year to year. In 1878 
Mr. Higinbotham was admitted as a partner, and in 1881 Mr. Leiter retired. From 
the latter year, for a quarter of a century, Mr. Field was the master spirit of the 
house. 



8 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

In 1885 was commenced the vast granite structure covering the square bounded 
by Adams, Franklin, Fifth avenue and Quincy,. for the accommodation of the whole- 
sale business, and it was completed in 1887. By the expansion of the retail depart- 
ment seven-eighths of the block bounded by State, Washington and Randolph streets 
and Wabash avenue has been covered with granite buildings twelve stories in height 
— the portion which is still unoccupied being the corner of Randolph street and 
Wabash avenue. The different structures are connected by covered bridgeways 
and for all conveniences are one. The Annex, on the corner of Washington street and 
Wabash avenue, M-as completed in 1893; Central Music Hall and other property on 
Randolph street, was razed and replaced by the Field buildings in 1901-02; in 
1905 the great store was extended north of the Annex along Wabash avenue, and 
during 1905 and 1906 the original building at the corner of State and Washington 
streets, which had been a mercantile landmark for so many years, was taken down 
and replaced by the present immense granite frontage. The floor area of the retail 
establishment is now forty-one acres, and its employes number from six to nine 
thousand, according to the season. Some thirty-five hundred persons are employed 
in the wholesale house. 

Mr. Field's public works are numerous and important. In March, 1871, he took 
a leading part in the effort to merge the old Chicago Library Association into the 
Yomig Men's Christian Association. After the great fire, he was one of the fore- 
most to inspire hope, courage and confidence in business circles, and make possible 
the greater Chicago which arose from the ruins. His services in the distribution of 
money and supplies were invaluable. Identified with the Chicago Relief Society 
from its organization, he was named by A. T. Stewart as first on the committee to 
control the fifty thousand dollars donated by him for the relief of women and 
children in Chicago. He was also for years a member of the Chicago Historical 
Society, aided in founding the Art Institute, was one of the organizers of the 
Citizens' League, and one of the charter members of the Commercial Club in 1877. 
In 1881 he aided in the establishment of the Chicago Musical Festival Association 
and of the Chicago Manual Training School in 1882. To the latter he gave twenty 
thousand dollars and to the new Chicago University he devoted a tract of land near 
the Midway Plaisance, now valued at two hundred thousand dollars, and known as 
"Marshall Field." He was long a director of the Merchants' Loan & Trust Com- 
pany, and was otherwise associated with many of the great commercial, financial 
and industrial enterprises which have made Chicago a world's metropolis. The 
climax of his public benefactions was the establishment of the Field ^Museum at 
Jackson Park, by provisions of his will, eight million dollars being bequeathed for 
its founding and suj^iDort. 

The death of Marshall Field, generally jDronounced the foremost citizen of 
Chicago, certainly one of the greatest figures of his day, occurred at the Holland 
House, New York, where he was staying during an anticipated week's absence from 
Chicago, on the 16th of January, 1906. There were present at his death bed his 
wife (formerly Mrs. Arthur Caton) to whom he had been married only a few months, 
Mr. Stanley Field, and Mrs. Marshall Field. Jr. The latter, who was the widow 
of his only son, recalls the tragic death of INIarshall Field. Jr.. less than two months 
before, a blow to the father which he bore with dignified silence, but which is 
thought by those nearest to him to have broken him in spirit and body. The great 
bulk of his fortune amounting to perhaps one hundred millions of dollars, M'cnt to 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 9 

his two grandsons^ Marshall Field III, and Henry Field. His only daughter, Mrs. 
David Beatty, wife of Rear Admiral Beatty, of the British navy, inherited six million 
dollars, and Mrs. Delia S. Caton Field the widow, as an ante-nuptial bequest, the 
magnificent family residence, with contents and one million dollars. 



RUFUS CUTLER DAWES. 

Rufus Cutler Dawes, whose attention in business lines has largely been given to 
the promotion of gas and electric light projects, is numbered among those men whose 
initiative spirit carries them beyond the bounds in which the great majority labor, 
and the extent and importance of the interests which he has financed and controlled 
well entitle him to be numbered among Chicago's captains of industry. He was born 
at Marietta, Ohio, July 30, 1867, a son of General Rufus R. and Mary Be- 
man (Gates) Dawes. His father served in the war of the rebellion as a colonel of 
the Sixth Wisconsin Regiment, which was a brilliant section of the famed Iron Bri- 
gade, and was brevetted brigadier general for distinguished services and gallant con- 
duct at the head of his command. He also served for one term in congress and died 
about ten years ago at his home in Marietta, Ohio, where his widow still resides. 
The Dawes family comes of old New England stock, of which William Dawes, who 
rode wnth Paul Revere on the memorable night when the Continental troops were 
aroused to repulse the British advance, was a member. Rufus C. Dawes was the 
second in order of birth in a family of four sons and two daughters, includ- 
ing: Charles G. Dawes, mentioned elsewhere in this volume; Hon. Beman G. Dawes, 
of Marietta, Ohio, who was formerly a member of congress; Henry M., who is as- 
sociated with his brother Rufus in business affairs ; Mary B., the wife of Rev. Arthur 
G. Beach, of Ypsilanti, Michigan; and Betsy D., the "svife of Harry B. Hoyt, man- 
ager of the gas company at Jacksonville, Florida. 

Rufus Cutler Dawes was graduated from Marietta College with the class of 1886, 
winning the degree of Bachelor of Arts, while on the 3d of June, 1893, his alma mater 
conferred upon him the JSIaster of Arts degree. Fortunate in that he was not born 
to a life of poverty or of closely restricted financial resources, Mr. Dawes in his busi- 
ness career has nevertheless proven that success is not a matter of fortunate circum- 
tances or of inherent genius, as held by some, but is rather the' outcome of clear 
judgment, experience and keen discernment. Throughout almost his entire business 
life he has given his attention to organizing and managing gas and electric compa- 
nies, in many of which he has been interested officially as well as financially. At 
present he holds a directorship and the presidency in the following institutions: 
Union Gas & Electric Company, Metropolitan Gas & Electric Company, Shreveport 
Gas, Electric Light & Power Company, Texarkana Gas & Electric Company, Mobile 
Gas Company, Citizens' Gas & Electric Company, Seattle Lighting Company, Pu- 
laski Gas Company, Beaumont Gas Light Company, and Central Indiana Gas Com- 
pany; and he fills offices in these and similar capacities in a number of other con- 
cerns of a like nature. He also has other extensive moneyed interests, connecting 
him inseparably with the promotion of business activity in the middle west, and is 
widely recognized as an efficient and reliable business man, capable of recognizing 



10 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

opportunities tliat others pass heedlessly by and capable also of coordinating forces 
into a harmonious working whole. 

:\rr. Dawes was married in 1893 to Miss Helen V. Palmer and the children 
born to them are William Mills, Charles Cutler and Jean Palmer Dawes. The 
family residence is at No. 1800 Sheridan road, Evanston, Illinois. Mr. Dawes is a 
republican in his political views and in matters of citizenship manifests a pro- 
gressiveness and loyalty that constitute him one of the strong supporters of projects 
for municipal upbuilding and betterment;, and he is president of the board of educa- 
tion, school district No. 75, Evanston, Illinois. He is, moreover, of a generous 
nature in his support of philanthropic movements and his name is on the member- 
ship roll of Chicago's leading social organizations, including the Chicago Club, 
Glen View, Evanston Country and Evanston Clubs. 



ALBERT KEEP. 



Albert Keep, whose activities were an element in the early commercial de- 
velopment of Chicago, in his later years through his business connections reached 
out to various sections of the country in the management and control of the affairs 
of the Chicago & Northwestern Railway system, of which he was made president. 
Ability may have been inherent, but it is only through the exercise and utilization of 
one's talents that they are developed, and a life of intense and intelligently di- 
rected activity gave to Albert Keep the power which made him for many years 
a most forceful business factor in railway circles. He was born in Homer, Cort- 
land county. New York, on the 30th of April, 1826, a son of Chauncey and Pru- 
dence (Wolcott) Keep, and was the fifth in a family of seven sons, all of whom 
were noted for superior business attainments and high character. The father 
was a man of wealth and likewise of sound judgment, who realized that if his 
sons were to become factors in the business world their instruction must be prac- 
tical and that their powers must be tested in the actual field of service. 

Albert Keep was sent as a pupil to the village schools and later spent two 
years as a student in Cortland Academy, but made his initial step in the business 
world when a youth of fourteen, being employed as clerk in a general country 
store in his native town from 1841 until 1846. His five years' experience there 
demonstrated the fact that he possessed latent ability and that he would develop 
it through industrious application. In all the five years he was never absent from 
his work for a single week day, being on hand at seven o'clock in the morning 
and often remaining until nine at night in the duties of the position. 

The field of his activity was transferred to the west in 1846 and a long cher- 
ished ambition saw its fulfillment when he became part owner of a store in White- 
water, Wisconsin, his associates in the enterprise being Philander Peck and Henry 
Keep. He remained in Whitewater until 1851, when the firm decided to dispose 
of their business there, having more capital than was needed by the demands of 
^ the trade in a small town. A removal was made to Chicago, where they opened 
a dry-goods house under the firm style of Peck, Keep & Company, their location 
being at No. 211 South Water street. The new undertaking was attended with 
success from the beginning, but the great activity in real estate led them to dis- 




ALBERT KEEP 



THE 


NEW YORK 


PUBLIC LIBRARY 


A ST oil 


, ij;n;ix and 


TlLl'C.N 


FOLNHATIONS 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 13 

pose of their mercantile interest in 1856, making investment of their capital in 
property. Mr. Keep erected a number of buildings which he rented and also sold 
as opportunity came to dispose of them at an advantageous figure. He continued 
to deal extensively in real estate and in making loans for himself and others. He 
suffered losses in the memorable fire of October, 1871, his office and most of his 
buildings being destroyed, but he at once resumed operations and continued ac- 
tively in business circles as a builder and dealer in real estate until June, 1873. 
He was then called to the presidency of the Chicago & Northwestern Railway 
system. His election to this office was a great tribute to him from the fact that 
he was not even a stockholder of the company at that time. It was necessary, 
however, for him to purchase stock in order to qualify for the presidency. He 
was closely associated with his brother Henry until chosen president of the rail- 
road company, their extensive interests being held mostly in partnership relations. 
During the many years that they were associated in business they worked in 
entire harmony, no contention or dissatisfaction ever arising. Their business ideas 
as well as their family relationship held them in a close bond after Albert Keep was 
elected to the railroad presidency. The multitudinous duties of such a position 
were in a measure familiar to him. He had had some previous experience with 
railway interests, having been retained in 1864 by the Lake Shore & Michigan 
Southern and the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad Companies to acquire 
greatly increased rights of way for them and also depot facilities, which they 
needed in and about Chicago. On his election to the directorate of the Lake Shore 
Railroad he was made a member of its executive committee and continued as a 
director for eighteen years, when the pressure of other business interests com- 
pelled him to resign. He remained as president of the Chicago & Northwestern 
for fourteen years, or until 1887, when he resigned to become chairman of the 
company's board of directors and under his administration as president and in 
his later office as chairman of the directorate the property of the company in- 
creased continuously in extent and value. He found the property poorly main- 
tained and equipped but his practical business methods soon wrought a change 
and his able management did much toward making the Northwestern one of the 
greatest railroads in the country. He resigned as chairman of the board in 1901 
but continued as a director to the time of his death. He was likewise a director 
of The Merchants' Loan & Trust Company. A conservative business man, he 
was never given to speculating but won his success in legitimate fields and through 
the successful conduct of important interests. 

Mr. Keep was twice married, his first union being with Susan Rice, of Homer, 
New York, April 6, 1851. She died November 29, 1859, and he was again mar- 
ried on the 3d of September, 1861, when Miss Harriet S. Gunn, who still survives 
him, became his wife. She is a native of East Bloomfield, Ontario county, New- 
York, and a daughter of Amos B. and Wealthy (Whittlesey) Gunn. Mr. and 
Mrs. Keep had one daughter, Lucy Gunn, who became the wife of Ralph Isham 
and had one son, Albert Keep Isham, who was born January 9, 1801. Mrs. 
Isham died July 12, 189t. A lover of home, Mr. Keep was found a most con- 
genial companion at his own fireside, where his friends were always sure of a 
hospitable welcome. He was bj^ nature social and democratic, 3'et dignity was 
never laid aside to the point of allowing familiarity. His was a strong character 
and marked personality and these won for him wide recognition. One of his 



14 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

most marked characteristics was his lironounced integrity. He had an especially 
liigli sense of honor, his word was as good as his bond and his jDromises were 
made to be kept. He was interested in many projects which have been of worth 
in the life of the city. He was a direct;or of The John Crerar Library, of the 
Chicago Home for the Incurables, a member of the Presbyterian church and a 
member of the Chicago and Calumet Clubs. He never regarded life as a dreary 
waste; on the contrary he was inclined to an optimism which, however, was well 
balanced by practical judgment. He recognized fully the obligations and re- 
sponsibilities of wealth and these were fully met. His success was the logical 
sequence of the natural unfolding and development of his native powers. He 
believed in the opiJortunity for natural development in each individual and his 
own life was an exposition of the wisdom of this view. 



MARVIX A. FARR. 



For thirty-eight years INIarvin A. Farr has been connected with the real-estate 
business in Chicago and is widely known as a prominent representative of that field 
of activity. He is a native of New York state, having been born in Essex county, in 
1853, and is the youngest of seven sons of George W. and Esther (Day) Farr. 
He is a scion of one of the oldest INIassachusetts families, being a direct descendant 
of George Farr, who with his brother Stephen settled in the Massachusetts Bay 
colony in 1629. The line of descent is through George (1), Stephen (2,), SteiDhen 
(3), Stephen (4), Stephen (5), Randall (6), and George W. (7). On the maternal 
side he is descended from Anthony Day, who came to Gloucester, Massachusetts, in 
1635. The lineage runs as follows: Anthony (l), Nathaniel (2), Benjamin (3), 
Jonathan (4), Jonathan (5), and Bezaliel (6), his mother being a daughter of 
Bezaliel and Celinda (Day) Day. The ancestors of Mr. Farr in all branches were 
among the earliest settlers of this country, having emigrated in the seventeenth cen- 
tury. George W. Farr, the father of our subject, came west in the '50s and located 
at Grand Rapids, Michigan, where he engaged in the lumber and mercantile busi- 
ness. He died there in 1863, at the age of fifty-five years. The mother died sev- 
eral years ago, aged eighty-three years. 

Marvin A. Farr received his early education principally in private schools and 
at Carroll College, A\ aukesha, Wisconsin, suj^plemented by private instruction and 
broadened through extensive travel in the United States and Europe. In 1871 he 
graduated from Carroll College, of Waukesha, Wisconsin, and two years later began 
his business career in the employ of H. H. Porter and James B. Goodman, of this 
city, then engaged in the lumber and real-estate business. About 1879 he ventured 
in the real-estate business for himself and for some time was also manager of the 
West Chicago Land Company, operating extensively in subdivisions of west side 
suburban property. For over thirty-five years Mr. Farr has been actively engaged 
in the real-estate business in Chicago, handling principally^ subdivisions and manu- 
facturing properties. He has long been a member of the Chicago Real Estate Board 
and something of his standing in real-estate circles is indicated by the fact that he 
has been honored with the presidency of that organization. While devoting his at- 
tention almost entirely to real-estate operations, Mr. Farr has also been identified 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 15 

actively and financially with numerous other enterprises and is now a director of 
the Chicago Title & Trust Company &nd interested in other corporations. He has 
taken an active interest in public institutions and movements and is a director of the 
United Charities. He is an active member of the Chicago Association of Commerce 
and chairman of its real-estate and loan division, and is also a member of the City 
Plans Committee. His social affiliations are with the Union League, Midlothian, 
Country and Kenwood Clubs, in all of which he has filled various official positions 
and served as president of the latter for some years. He is an independent repub- 
lican and a member of the Kenwood Evangelical church. 

In 1886 Mr. Farr was united in marriage to Miss Charlotte Camp, a daughter 
of the late Isaac N. Camp, of this city. They have two children: Newton Camp 
Farr, who graduated from Cornell College as a civil engineer and is now engaged in 
the practice of his profession; and Barbara Farr, still at home. Mr. Farr has offices 
in the Marquette building and resides at No. 4737 Woodlawn avenue. 



HOMER ALLISON STILLWELL. 

Homer Allison Stillwell, vice president of Butler Brothers and manager of the 
Chicago house, was born in Nineveh, Pennsylvania, December 30, 1860. His father, 
Addison Stillwell, a native of Pennsylvania, was a veteran of the Civil war and died 
in 1863 from illness contracted in the service. His wife, who bore the maiden name 
of Rhoda Thompson, was of a prominent Pennsylvania family who removed to Illi- 
nois in pioneer times. The Stillwell family is of English ancestry and the Thomp- 
sons alsa came of English lineage. 

After the death of his father Homer Allison Stillwell removed with his mother 
and his brother, McClellan Stillwell, now of Auburn, New York, to southeastern 
Ohio, where he lived until nine years of age, when a further move was made to 
Urbana, Illinois. He acquired much of his education in the public schools there, 
working during the periods of vacation, and in due time was graduated from the 
high school. He afterward spent two years in the University of Illinois, working his 
way through his entire educational course. In 1882 he left college and came to Chi- 
cago where he wished to secure a situation in connection with the lumber trade, but 
after some weeks of unsuccessful effort he abandoned this plan and accepted a posi- 
tion with Butler Brotliers in the packing room. He rapidly worked up through 
numerous promotions and in a few years became head of the packing room, and sub- 
sequently chief of the shipping department, while in 1893 he was made manager of 
the house. In time he acquired a financial interest in the business and in 1 902 was 
made a director, while in 1907 he was elected vice president, which office he still fills. 
He has devoted his entire time and energy to this position and is not actively con- 
nected with any other although a director of the National City Bank. 

On the 1st of March, 1886, Mr. Stillwell was married to Miss Ellen Hill, of 
St. Louis, and they have two sons: Addison Stillwell, a Yale graduate of 1911, and 
Wellesley H., a student in St. Paul's preparatory school of Concord, New Hamp- 
shire. The family reside at No. 5017 Greenwood avenue. 

Mr. Stillwell is a Mason and was for some years active in the order. He is a 
member of Landmark Lodge and is a past eminent commander of Mount Joy Com- 



16 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

mandery, K. T. He also belongs to Oriental Consistory,, A. A. S. R.. and to IMedinah 
Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He holds membership in the Commercial Club and was 
its secretary in 1909-10. He is likewise a member of the Union League, of which 
he has been a director since 1909, and belongs also to the Chicago Athletic Asso- 
ciation, the Mid-Day Club, the Hamilton Club, the Midlothian Club, the Onwentsia 
Club, the South Shore Country Club, the Traffic Club, the Service Club, the Illini 
Club of the Alumni of the University of Illinois, tlie Pennsylvania Society and the 
Kenwood Country Club. His principal activity outside of business has been in con- 
nection with the Chicago Association of Commerce, of which he has been a member 
for some years. He was chairman of its ways and means committee of 1907, in 1908 
was first vice president, and 1909 chairman of the executive committee and the fol- 
lowing year was elected its president. He has been very active in its work and has 
served on numerous important committees, his labors being a potent instrumentality 
in the upbuilding of the association since 1907. His religious faith is indicated by 
his membership in the Kenwood Evangelical church. 



CHARLES G. DAWES. 



Charles Gates Dawes, president of the Central Trust Company of Illinois, ex- 
comptroller of the currency and a financier of national repute, both in practice and 
the clear enunciation of theories, is a native of Marietta, Ohio, born August 27, 1865. 
He is a son of General Rufus R. and Mary B. (Gates) Dawes. His father served 
in the war of the Rebellion as the brave colonel of the Sixth Wisconsin Regiment, 
a brilliant imit of the famed Iron Brigade, and was brevetted brigadier general for 
distinguished services and gallant conduct at the head of his regiment. He repre- 
sented his district in congress for one term and was otherwise prominent in the pub- 
lic affairs of the state. He died about ten j'ears ago at his home in I\f arietta, where 
his widow still resides. The family comes of old Massachusetts stock of English 
origin and among the ancestors was William Dawes, who agreed with Paul Revere 
that he would ride in one direction and Revere in another to alarm the settlers of 
the approach of the British that meant the opening of the Revolutionary war. Charles 
G. Dawes was the eldest in a family of four sons and two daughters, the others 
being: Rufus C, of whom a sketch also appears in this work; Hon. Beman G. Dawes, 
of Marietta, Ohio, former member of congress ; Henry M., associated with his broth- 
ers in business here; Mary B., the wife of Rev. Arthur G. Beach, of Ypsilanti, 
Michigan; and Betsy D., the wife of Harry B. Hoyt, manager of the gas company 
at Jacksonville, Florida. 

Charles G. Dawes was educated in the common schools of his native town and at 
Marietta College, graduating from the latter institution in 1884, and two years later 
from the Cincinnati Law School. He had already done considerable work as a rail- 
road civil engineer and after graduating in law became chief engineer of a small 
line which is now part of the Toledo & Ohio Central Railroad. In .1887 he re- 
moved to Lincoln, Nebraska, and for seven years was there engaged in the practice 
of law. Having made a special study of railroad freight rates, he was retained by 
many Nebraska shippers in their suits against the railroads, whose hearings brought 
about the passage of the Interstate Commerce law. In the pressing of these suits he 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 17 

came into marked prominence as a lawyer and at the same time obtained high stand- 
ing as a republican leader and campaigner. In 1891 he removed to Evanston, Illi- 
nois, having acquired an interest in the local gas company, his activities in this 
direction afterward extending to other points. 

Mr. Dawes had been an admirer of William McKinley and in 1895 inaugurated 
the work in Illinois, which led the republican state convention of 1896 to instruct 
its delegates to support him for president in the national nominating convention. He 
was appointed on the executive committee of the republican national committee and 
was regarded as McKinley's special representative. When Mr. Dawes was ap- 
pointed comptroller of the currency in 1897 his relations with the president became 
even more confidential and his business-like conduct of the affairs of his office, espe- 
cially his regard for the welfare of depositors in the national banks, met with 
the cordial apjoroval both of the administration and the general public, irrespective of 
party. On October 1, 1901, he resigned the office to enter upon his campaign for the 
United States senatorship, but in May of the following year withdrew from the con- 
test and a few days later was elected to his present position as head of the Central 
Trust Company of Illinois, which he had then recently organized. Mr. Dawes was 
the youngest man who ever held the position of comptroller of the currency; biit in 
his case comparative youth and inexperience seemed to be no drawback to advance- 
ment. Mr. Dawes is also a director of the Peoples Trust & Savings Bank, the 
Monroe National Bank and the Calumet Insurance Company and is interested in 
numerous gas and electric projects with his brother Rufus C. Dawes. Moreover, his 
humanitarian spirit is manifest in his active cooperation with projects tending to 
ameliorate the hard conditions of life for the unfortunate. For the past three years 
he has been the president of the Home for Destitute Crippled Children, in which 
position he succeeded the late James H. Eckels. He is also vice president of the 
Chicago Grand Opera Company. 

On January 24, 1889, Mr. Dawes married Miss Caro Dana Blymyer, of Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, and their children are Rufus Fearing and Carolyn. The family home 
is still in Evanston. Mr. Dawes is a member of many clubs, his connection in- 
cluding the Commercial, Chicago, Union League, Glen View, Evanston, Evanston 
Country, Evanston Golf, Marquette and Hamilton Clubs. 



HERMAN WALDECK. 



Herman Waldeck, vice president of the Continental & Commercial National 
Bank, was born in Baden, Germany, November 19, 1S71. In his native land he 
pursued his education and in 1892 when twenty-one years of age, crossed the Atlantic 
to the new world with Chicago as his destination. Throughout the period of his 
residence here he has been connected with banking interests. He was first employed 
as clerk in the International Bank of Chicago from 1893 until 1897, and in the 
latter year became connected with the Continental National Bank in a minor clerical 
capacity, b'ecoming assistant cashier in 1903, which position he held until elected 
to the vice-presidency in July, 1909. Since the consolidation of the Continental 
National Bank with the Commercial National, in August, 1910, he has occupied tho 
position of vice president of the Continental & Commercial National Bank, taking: 



18 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 



( 



an active part in its management, in shaping its policy and in extending the scope 
of its activity and business relations. Advancement has come to him as the logical 
sequence of his close application and the ability he has displayed in meeting the 
heavy responsibilities which have devolved upon him in his various connections with 
the banking interests of the city. 

On the 22d of April, 1903, Mr. Waldeck was united in marriage to ]Miss Ger- 
trude Schwab, a daughter of Aaron Schwab, of Chicago, and they now reside at No. 
5328 East End avenue. His social nature finds manifestation in his membership in 
a number of the leading clubs of the city, including the Union League, the Mid-Day, 
the South Shore Country, the Bankers and the Lake Shore Country Clubs. 



CHARLES HENROTIN. 



Charles Henrotin, one of the organizers and the first president of the Chicago 
Stock Exchange, whose life of intense and well directed activity has constituted a 
source of the city's progress and development, has won honors both at home and 
abroad. Coming from a distinguished ancestry, his lines of life have been cast in 
harmony therewith. He was born April 15, 1843, in Brussels, Belgium, a son of 
Dr. Joseph F. and Adele (Brice) Henrotin, who were also natives of that land. 
They arrived in Chicago in 1848 and Dr. Henrotin continued in the active practice 
of medicine in this city from that date until his death in 1876. His service was 
especially valuable during the cholera epidemic that raged from the years 1850 to 
1854. The family achieved distinction in the field of medical and surgical practice 
through several generations, the last being the late Ferdinand Henrotin, in whose 
honor Memorial Hospital of the north side was named. 

Brought to Chicago in his fifth year, Charles Henrotin pursued his education in 
the schools of this city until 1856, when he was matriculated in the College of 
Tournai in Belgium, therein pursuing a four years' course, which he completed by 
graduation with the class of 1860. His tastes from early boyhood were extremely 
literary and this strain in his nature has been an influencing factor throughout his 
entire life, leading him into close and pleasant association with the distinguished 
citizens and men of letters of Chicago. 

He returned from Belgium in 1860 to accept the position of lieutenant on the 
staff of General Fremont at Cape Girardeau, ^lissouri. At length he resigned that 
position to enter the service of the Merchants Loan & Trust Company, of which 
he became cashier in 1866, succeeding Lyman J. Gage, late secretary of the treas- 
ury. Broad and varied experience in connection with that institution well qualified 
him to engage in business on his own account, when, in 1877, he turned his attention 
to the conduct of a private banking and brokerage business. His word has come to be 
largely accepted as authority upon questions of finance in Chicago, for the character 
of his business has placed him prominently in the front rank among the city's 
financiers. He has promoted many enterprises and as broker represented the Eng- 
lish syndicates for the sale of the breweries of Chicago and the Union Stock Yards. 
He dealt extensively in the bonds and scrip of Chicago during the period of the city's 
financial embarrassment from 1878 until 1880 and paid the city interest on bonds 
for the year 1877, advancing the money for a year to prevent default. In 1881 he 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 19 

established the first telephone company of Paris, France, and has financed many im- 
portant business projects not only in this city but elsewhere. He was the principal 
organizer and promoter of the Chicago Stock Exchange, was chosen its first presi- 
dent and has held the office for two other terms. He was also a member of the New 
York Stock Exchange for many years and is connected with the Chicago Board of 
Trade. 

High honors have been conferred upon Mr. Henrotin in public and semi-public 
connections. He was chosen a director of the World's Columbian Exposition in 1892 
and was a member of several of the most important committees. In 1876 he was 
appointed the successor of his father, Dr. Joseph F. Henrotin, in the office of Bel- 
gium consul at this place. In the same year he was made consul general of the 
Ottoman Empire and still occupies both offices. 

In 1869 Mr. Henrotin was united in marriage to Miss Ellen Martin, one of the 
most prominent social leaders and club women of Chicago. She was vice president 
of the auxiliary of the World's Fair congresses and was twice president of the Fed- 
eration of Women's Clubs of the United States. She has the decorations of the 
Chefaskat of Turkey, the Palms Academic of France, of an officer of the Academy 
of France and Chevalier of the Legion of Honor of Belgium. The decorations that 
have been conferred upon Mr. Henrotin were those of the Order of Commander of 
the Medijidec and Commander of the Osraanic of Turkey; officer of the Legion of 
Honor of Belgium; Chevalier of the Crown of Belgium; the decoration of the Civic 
Cross of Belgium, presented in recognition of twenty-five years consular service; and 
Chevalier of the Legion of Honor of France. His club relations are with the most 
prominent social organizations of the city, including the Germania, Bankers', Chi- 
cago and other clubs. He is recognized as a leader not only in the field of finance, 
where his operations have been extensive, but also in municipal and governmental 
affairs, in the social life of the city and in the discussion of themes of broad and 
vital significance. 



PATRICK J. CUMMINGS. 

Patrick J. Cummings, one of the organizers of the Eastern Casket Company 
and widely known as a leading undertaker of Chicago, was born in County Tip- 
perary, Ireland, on the 5th of March, 185-i, and is a son of Patrick and Mary 
Cummings. The father died in the year 1856. In the family there were eight 
children, of whom Patrick J. was the youngest. Four sons of the family had already 
come to the United Stated when in October, 1865, Mr. Cummings of this review, 
accompanied by his mother, crossed the Atlantic. They settled on the north side in 
Chicago and iSIrs. Cummings spent her remaining days in this city, her death 
occurring in 1870. 

Patrick J. Cummings was a lad of nine years when with his mother he made the 
trip across the briny deep to the new world. He acquired a public school education 
and made his initial step in the business world as an employe in the McCormick 
Reaper Works. Later he occupied a position in the coopering establishment of 
Jones & Chapin, and in 1877 he secured a position with the City Railway Company 
as register, clerk and assistant foreman. Thus gradually but steadily he was work- 



20 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

ing his way upward and increasingly responsible positions brought him increased 
pay that in time made him the possessor of capital sufficient to enable him to engage 
in business on his own account. In 1890 he established an undertaking business at 
No. ilSl South State street mider the firm style of O'Toole & Cummings. In 1897 
the partnership was dissolved and Mr. Cummings started out independently at 
No. 4104 South State street. Subsequently he removed his business to No. 4116 
South State street and in 1908 he erected a building for his own purposes at No. 
4125 South State street — a three story structure having a stone front twenty-five 
feet in breadth. He has his own chapel seating one hundred, and he owns an auto 
livery. 

In 1901 Mr. Cummings was united in marriage to Miss Helen L. Dobson, of 
Chicago. He is identified with several organizations, including the Royal League, 
the Independent Order of I'oresters, the Woodmen of the World, the Catholic Order 
of Foresters, the Knights of Columbus and the Columbian Knights. He served as 
high chief ranger of the Foresters of Illinois for four years. He was one of the 
founders of St. Elizabeth's Catholic church, in which he still holds membership. 
His political allegiance is given to the democratic party and he had charge of the 
sewer department of Hyde Park for twelve years as superintendent, doing im- 
portant public work in this connection. Along professional lines he is well known 
as a member of the Chicago Undertakers Association, with which he has been 
identified since starting out in this line of business. He was elected president in 
1909 and has been re-elected at each succeeding election since that time. He is also 
a member of the State and National Associations and has attended several of the 
national conventions held in San Francisco, California, in Milwaukee, in Columbus, 
Ohio, and in Florida. He organized the Eastern Casket Company and he has done 
much in promoting the interests of the profession through securing city legislation 
of value not only to the profession but also of great value to the general public. He 
has made steady progress in his business and is most liberally patronized. At the 
same time he has found opportunity to co-operate in plans and measures for the 
general good and has done valuable work as a citizen. 



ERSKINE MASON PHELPS. 

The history of Erskine Mason Phelps is the story of laudable ambition, un- 
faltering activity and earnest endeavor to reach in the business field a high plane, 
and that the qualities chosen as chief factors in his commercial career were result- 
ant, was evidenced through many years in the house of Phelps, Dodge & Palmer, 
which enjoyed both local and national fame. As its chief executive, Mr. Phelps 
was through a long period the main factor in bringing that enterprise to the es- 
tablished basis which it occupied. He was born in Stonington, Connecticut, March 
31, 1839, a son of Charles H. and Ann (Hammond) Phelps. He came of an 
ancestry honorable and distinguished. The Phelps family is one of the oldest 
and most prominent of New England and one that has had a close and continuous 
identification with the history of Connecticut from its first settlement. The Amer- 
ican progenitor of the family was William Phelps, who was born in Tewkesbury, 
Gloucestershire, England, in 1599. He was one of the original members of the 




ERSKINE M. PHELPS 



THE XI-W YOr.K ' 

PUBLIC ltri:ai:y 



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TTLItE.N' FOI..M.A- S 
R L 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 23 

Church of England, of which the noted divine, Rev. Warham, was pastor. Mr. 
Phelps accompanied the party led by Rev. Warham to the new world. They 
crossed the Atlantic in 1630 as passengers on the old time sailing vessel, Mary 
and John, and first located in Dorchester, Massachusetts. In the sjjring of 16.36 
William Phelps removed with his children to Windsor, Connecticut, and became 
a prominent factor in the affairs of the colony, residing there until his death on 
the 27th of November, 1675. 

His youngest son, Timothy Phelps, wedded Mary Griswold, and the line of 
descent is traced on down through Timothy Phelps II, who married Martha Crow; 
Charles Phelps, who married Hepzipeth Stiles ; and Dr. Charles Phelps, who was 
founder of the family in Stonington, Connecticut, where he first built a house at 
the foot of Cosaduc hill in the portion of the town known as North Stonington. 
About 1765 he removed to the main town of Stonington and erected a residence, 
which in later years formed the ell to the fine country home of his great-ffrandson, 
Hon. Erskine M. Phelps, of Chicago. Dr. Charles Phelps in 1767 became the 
first judge of the probate court for the town of Stonington, an office which he filled 
for thirty-three years. He married Hannah Dennison, and after her death, Sally 
Swan became his wife. His sixth cliild, Joseph D. Phelps, grandfather of E. 
M. Phelps, married Hannah Babcock. 

The eldest son and second child of Joseph D. and Hannah (Babcock) Phelps 
was Charles H. Phelps, who was born in Stonington, Connecticut, in 1795, and 
at one time was the most prominent dry-goods merchant of New Orleans. He 
was instrumental in raising and paving the streets in both New Orleans and 
Mobile, Alabama. He met his death January 17, 18 iO, when tlie steamer Lex- 
ington was burned while on her regular trip from New York to Stonington. He 
had married Ann R. Hammond, and their children were six in number. Erskine 
M. Phelps, the youngest of the faniily, acquired bis early education at East Hamp- 
ton, Massachusetts, where he also attended Edward Williston Seminary. He was 
an apt and able student and with a goodly fund of information to serve as the 
foundation for the building of success, he went to St. Louis in 1857 and entered 
upon his business career there. He became connected with the banking firm of 
Allan, Copp & Nesbit and after a faithful service of two years removed to Boston, 
where he established a brokerage business on his own account. In February, 1861, 
he arrived in Chicago and entered into partnership with George E. P. Dodge, 
establishing a wholesale boot and shoe business. In 1865 the style name of the 
house, which was destined to grow into one of the leading enterprises of the 
west, was changed to Phelps, Dodge & Palmer, under which the business obtained 
a foremost place in the wholesale boot and shoe trade of the entire northwest. 
Year by year the enterprise was carefully and successfully conducted, enjoying 
continuous and substantial growth until 1899, when the firm sold out to the Ed- 
wards-Stanwood Shoe Comi>any, of which concern Mr. Phelps was a director. He 
re-^tained, however, only a supervisory interest in the house and so arranged matters 
that the older employes should enjoy most of the profits. He was also a director 
of the Merchants Loan & Trust Compam^, of the London Guarantee & Accident 
Company, the Commonwealth Edison Company, alid a director and investor in 
other business enterprises and organizations. His life record stands as a splendid 
example of what may be accomplished in the commercial field, when energy, keen 
insight and unfaltering purpose are brought into full play. 

Vol. IV— 2 



24 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

On the 26tli day of October^ 1861, Mr. Phelps was married to Miss Anna E. 
Wilder. A happy home life was maintained for forty-five years, being terminated 
in the death of Mr. Phelps at his residence at No. 1703 Indiana avenue, May 21, 
1910, when he was seventy-one years of age. 

Aside from business connections Mr. Phelps was most prominent and widely 
known. His political allegiance was given to the democracy and he was prominent 
in club circles. He was one of the organizers and for seven years was president 
of the Iroquois Club of Chicago and took active part in the tariff reform propa- 
ganda, which was contemporaneous with the administration of Grover Cleveland. 
At one time he served as chairman of the state committee of the democratic party 
and at another time was a member of the democratic national committee. He 
never sought or desired office, however, although in 1884 he was mentioned as a 
democratic candidate for the United States senatorship. Always favoring a low 
tariff, in 1883 he and other members of the Iroquois Club determined to support 
this doctrine at a banquet given under the auspices of the club. This was the 
first important political banquet ever held in Chicago and the precursor of the 
regular annual affairs of that kind since given by the Iroquois Club for many 
years. The banquet was a success, being attended by distinguished democratic 
leaders, including Senator Bayard, Thomas A. Hendricks and others. This brought 
Mr. Phelps into political prominence and soon afterward he went with Potter 
Palmer and other distinguished representatives of the party to Washington and 
secured the democratic convention of 1884 for Chicago. He was at that time a 
strong Tilden man but after paying a visit to Mr. Tilden was convinced that the 
latter was not in physical condition to accept the nomination and returned to 
Chicago, advocating the cause of Grover Cleveland, then governor of New York. 
Mr. Cleveland was nominated mainly on account of the Illinois votes and afterward 
showed his appreciation of this fact by making Mr. Phelps his personal repre- 
sentative in Chicago, seeking his advice whenever offices were to be distributed. 
After the election of Mr. Cleveland and at his inauguration he said to Mr. Phelps: 
"Now, what can I do for you and what do you want?" The latter reiDlied: "Just 
allow me to go home to Chicago and attend to my business. I have accomplished 
what I set out to do — make you the nation's chief executive." Mr. Phelps declined 
the ministry to the court of St. James during the first administration of President 
Cleveland but during the second term accepted the appointment of consul to Col- 
ombia, which he retained up to the time of his death. It was on the recommenda- 
tion of Mr. Phelps that Lambert Tree was sent as minister to Belgium and 
General Winston to Persia, and at his request Melville W. Fuller was made chief 
justice of the United States. In 1888 he was elected a member of the democratic 
national committee, serving four years, after which he was not an active factor 
in political management although never ceasing to feel a deep interest in vital 
political questions and situations of the country. He became a member of the 
World's Columbian Exposition commission, in the interests of which he took a 
journey, accompanied by his wife, around the globe in 1892 and 1893, while for 
seven 3'^ears he was president of the National Business League. In many of the 
organizations with which he was connected he was an earnest working member 
and his opinions carried weight in their councils, for his fellow members recog- 
nized his keen insight and the soundness of mature judgment. He was one of 
the earl)^ members of the Central church, of which the late Professor David Swing 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 25 

was minister to the time of his death, and of which Dr. F. W. Giinsaulus is now 
pastor. Mr. Phelps long served as president of its board of trustees but resigned 
on account of ill health. He was president of Hahnemann Hospital and no good 
work done in the name of charity or religion sought his aid in vain. He was a 
director of various benevolent institutions and, moreover, a generous supporter of 
these, although his benefactions were of a quiet nature. He led a prominent club 
life, holding membership in the Chicago, Commercial, Calumet, South Shore Coun- 
try, Saddle and Cycle, Bankers, Mid-Day, Pickwick Country and Washington Park 
Clubs of Chicago. And even further than this his club connections extended, as 
he was a member of the Manhattan Club of New York, the Temple and xllgonquin 
Clubs of Boston and the Thatched House of London. 

He was a great student and admirer of Napoleon and thoroughh^ familiar with 
his historJ^ He left one of the finest and most valuable Napoleonic collections 
in America, which following his demise was given by Mrs. Phelps to the Harper 
Memorial Library of Chicago. He manifested, moreover, a very keen interest 
in the welfare and progress of his native town, Stonington, Connecticut, where his 
magnificent country estate included land that had been 'in possession of the family 
for almost one hundred and fifty 3'ears. His attachment to the place was a matter 
of sentiment — a trait strongly developed in the sons of New England. Extended 
trips abroad as well as in this land brought him wide general information and 
culture which only travel can bring. He was widely known as a genial host and 
thoroughgoing business man and one who gained honor and admiration through 
his commercial integritj' and conservatism. While connected with the boot and 
shoe trade he introduced many innovations that have worked for the improved 
comfort of the public and wrought wholesale changes in commercial S}^stem and 
along lines of progressiveness. His personal acquaintance with leading citizens 
of note was a broad one and his spirit of good fellowship made life brighter for 
those with whom he came in contact. Mr. Phelps was laid to rest in his beautiful 
mausoleum that stands in Evergreen cemetery in Stonington, Connecticut. 



LEWIS ELLSWORTH INGALLS. 

Lewis Ellsworth Ingalls, a man of large affairs, displaying at all times an apti- 
tude for successful management combined with keen sagacity in investment and 
marked executive ability in control of important interests, has long been known as 
one of Chicago's most prominent and honored business men. His building ojDerations 
have contributed largely to the improvement of the city. 

Mr. Ingalls is one of the native sons of Illinois, his birth having occurred October 
26, 1839, in Du Page, Will county, when that section of the state was a pioneer dis- 
trict. His father, Henry Ingalls, was born at Walpole, Vermont, April 10, 1800, 
and on leaving New England became a representative of the farming interests of 
Will county, Illinois. He married Lois Boyce, who was born in New York in 1800, 
her death occurring in Will county in 1856, while Mr. Ingalls passed away in Naper- 
ville, Illinois, April 10, 1875. Their family numbered twelve children, of whom four 
are yet living: Abner E., of Joliet ; Frank I., of Seneca, Kansas; Mrs. Lois Sargent, 



26 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

of Napervillc; and Lewis E. Those who have passed away are Samuel, Mary, 
Henry, Jonathan, Phoebe, Hannah, George and Andrew. 

The eighth in order of birth, Lewis E. Ingalls, divided his time between the work 
of the home farm, the pleasures of the playground and the duties of the schoolroom, 
his educational advantages, however, being limited to about eight months' attendance 
at the Xaperville school. Possessing an observing eye and a retentive memory, he 
has constantly mastered the lessons of daily life and is \ndely recognized as a broad- 
minded man of sound judgment, keen discrimination and marked sagacity. He started 
out in life for himself at the age of sixteen years. The word fail has never had a 
l^art in his vocabulary and laudable ambition has at all times stimulated his effort. 

Today one of the extensive property owners and most successful business men 
of Chicago, it is hard to conceive that he started in the humble capacity of a farm 
hand, receiving ten dollars per month and his board. Subsequently the value of his 
service led to an increase of his salary from ten dollars to sixteen dollars and then to 
twenty-five dollars per month. At the age of nineteen years he went to Iowa where 
he devoted the summer months to farming near Waterloo, and in the winter seasons 
engaged in trap^jing. Four years thus passed, after which he devoted three years 
to general farming in his native county. He then established a home at Claybanks, 
Wisconsin, where he was engaged in getting out lumber for a year, which constituted 
his initial step in connection with the lumber trade. Returning to Illinois, he con- 
ducted lumber yards at Naperville and Lemont, but gradually extended his efforts 
as his business ability was recognized and his cooperation was sought in different 
lines. While conducting his lumber yards he arranged with the Cliicago, St. Louis 
& Western Railroad Company to purchase its right of way and also had charge of 
the grading of the road south of Joliet as well as other sections of the line. Persist- 
ent work and economy at length brought him a cajjital sufficient to enable liim in 1 8(59 
to establish himself permanently as a strong factor in some important and growing 
community and seek an opportunity for judicious investment. He at length pur- 
chased three hundred acres of fine farming land within two miles of the court- 
house of Joliet, and further investment made him the owner of an additional four 
hundred acres on the west side of Joliet. There he located the Phenox Horseshoe 
Factory, the Western Gas Company, the Chemical Works and a large match factory, 
also the Saint Fen Railroad Comjjany and the Elgin, Joliet & Eastern Railroad. 

Since 1870 he has continuously occupied his country estate, althougli for many 
years he has been the leading real-estate dealer of Joliet and for more tlian two de- 
cades has operated extensively in projjerty in Chicago, where he has also conducted 
other business enterprises of magnitude. His farm near Joliet now comprises three 
hundred and forty acres, beautifully situated. Sixty acres of this lias recently 
been subdivided and supplied with water, with a sewer system and cement walks, 
with shade trees and fine drives. Nature and art have done much to make his place 
a beautiful country home, the work of the landscape gardener being manifest in the 
adornment of lawn and park. There is also a sod mile race track, one of the fastest 
in America, on the place and many successful fairs and races have been here held in 
what is known as Ingalls' Park. One of the important features of the farm is a large 
dairy and the breeding of fine horses and cattle also constitutes a source of income. 
Altogether tlic Ingalls farm is one of the model country places of the Mississippi 
valley. 

In tlie field of business, aside from agricultural interests, ^Mr. Ingalls has o[)- 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 27 

erated extensively. Upon removing to Joliet he established a lumber yard there, but 
a year later disposed of it in order to concentrate his energies upon his agricultural 
interests and his real-estate and loan business, which he conducted at Joliet until 
opening an office in Chicago in 1887. The former city, moreover, has benefited by 
his cooperation in other lines. He establislied the first electric plant in Joliet in 18812 
— the predecessor of the Economy Light & Power Company. For fifteen years he 
was engaged in the active conduct of a light plant, first of the Joliet Lighting Com- 
pany and afterward of two other organizations ; finally, with others, purchasing Dam 
No. 1 and forming the Economy Light & Power Company. While engaged in the 
lumber trade he sold much of his material to the steel mills, but eventually disposed of 
his business to the firm of Mason & Plant. Mr. Ingalls was instrumental in forming a 
plan that resulted in the purchase of the water plant of Joliet, and for a time was 
connected with the Chicago & Southwestern Railway Company, which sold its line 
to the Santa Fe Railroad Company, with which he was also connected for two years. 

In 1887 Mr. Ingalls opened his Chicago office and since that time his labors have 
been of as much value to the metropolis as they were to Joliet. He is president and 
treasurer of the Richmond-Smith Company, a milk agency representing nearly three 
thousand farmers who ship milk to this city. He is also treasurer and general man- 
ager of the Dermiforma Company of America, which has been organized for several 
years, Mr. Ingalls assuming control as treasurer and manager, since which time he 
has increased the business of the concern until it is now the largest in the United 
States. The process is taken from the whey of the milk and made into an acid for 
tanning leather and will do more in six days than any other process will accomplish 
in eighteen days, and leaves tlie leather in much better condition, it being absolutely 
sweet and odorless. This is bound in time to be used in all the tanneries of the world. 
In the conduct of the milk business he sells the product of over seventeen hundred 
farmers and supplies over six hundred dealers in Chicago and is now conducting the 
most extensive business in the city. In the conduct of the dairy business he has con- 
tinually studied to improve the quality of milk that his patrons may be perfectly 
satisfied, and since taking charge three years ago Mr. Ingalls has succeeded in 
improving the milk fifty per cent. He has always found real-estate operations a 
productive field and improving the opportunity for judicious investment here, his 
property holdings in Chicago have become very extensive and valuable. He owns, 
among other Chicago real estate, the Del Prado hotel, at Fifty-ninth street and 
Madison and Washington avenues. He has thoroughly informed himself concerning 
realty values in Chicago and has held offices in the Chicago real-estate board. 

On the 22nd of October, 1865, Mr. Ingalls wedded Miss Millie Emerson of 
Door county, Wisconsin, who died in Lemont, Illinois, March 10, 1868. He has 
since married ]\Iiss Esther E. Bartholomew of Marengo, Illinois, a daughter of 
Russ Bartholomew, a farmer of McHenry county, this state. The four children 
of the second marriage are: Millie R., who was born October 16, 1870, and died 
at Danville, New York, September 22, 1892; Royce K.. who was born December 
1, 1872, and passed away April 27, 1894; Myra R., who was born January 1, 187 1, 
and is now the wife of George M. Peale, a resident of Joliet, and Charles I-. who 
was born December 19, 1871, and died in 1881. 

Mr. Ingalls is a valued member of the leading clubs of Joliet and Chicago, be- 
longing to the Union League and Commercial Clubs in the former city and to the 
Union League and Hamilton Clubs in the latter. He has attained the Knights 



28 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

Templar degree in the York Rite Masonry, his membership being in the commandery 
at Joliet and he is also numbered among the nobles of Medinah Temple of the Mystic 
Shrine in Chicago. His political allegiance is unfalteringly^ given to the republican 
party and his interest in municipal affairs has been manifest in tangible cooperation 
with many movements for the general good. His life has been one of continuous 
activity in wliich has been accorded due recognition of labor. Starting out in life 
with limited educational advantages, working as a farm hand at a meager salary of 
ten dollars per month and then becoming imbued with the laudable ambition to 
attain something better, he has steadily advanced in those walks of life demanding 
intellectuality, business ability, and fidelity. In his life are the elements of great- 
ness because of the use he has made of his talents and opportunities and because 
his thoughts are not self-centered but are given to the mastery of life's problems 
and the fulfilment of his dutv as a man in his relations to his fellowmen, and as 
a citizen in his relations to his citv, state and country. 



OLAF J. PETERSON, 



Olaf J. Peterson, a well known Chicago undertaker, whose long connection with 
the business and honorable methods have brought him a liberal patronage, was born 
February 24, 1883, in the city which is yet his home, his parents being John and 
Hannah Peterson, both of whom were natives of Sweden. They became residents of 
Chicago in 1880 and the father engaged in contract teaming but has now departed 
this life. The mother, however, is still living. 

Olaf J. Peterson acquired a high school education and in his youth was employed 
in a foundry equipment business. He and his brother, Martin, turned their attention 
to tlie undertaking business in 1907, establishing a store at Twenty-second street and 
Oakley avenue. Olaf Peterson was graduated from the Chicago Post Graduate 
School of Undertaking and in connection with his brother, Martin, began business 
under the firm style of Peterson Brothers. In 1911 they opened another place at 
No. 5831 West Chicago avenue, erecting a building of thirty feet frontage and two 
stories in height. In connection with this they have a chapel and carry a large line 
of undertaking supplies and caskets. The first place which they established is con- 
ducted by his brother and Olaf J. Peterson has charge of their second establishment. 
They own their hearses and motor equipment for the conduct of funerals and their 
business has steadily grown because their methods have found favor with the public. 
They put forth every effort to please their patrons and the integrity of their methods 
and their harmonious co-operation has secured to them a gratifying patronage, their 
business steadily growing through the recommendation of their customers. 

On the 30th of November, 1905, Olaf J. Peterson was united in marriage to Miss 
Anna Lundquist, of Chicago, and two children, Donald and Bert, add to the interest 
of their home. ]Mr. Peterson is a well known Mason, belonging to Austin Lodge, 
No. 850, A. F. & A. M.; and Cicero Chapter, No. 180, R. A. M. He also has mem- 
bership with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, belonging to both the lodge and 
its woman's auxiliary, the Daughters of Rebekah. He is likewise connected with the 
Red Men and Avith the Vikings, in addition to several other Swedish societies. His 
religious faith is that of the Lutheran church and to its teachings he loyally adheres. 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 29 

Politically he maintains an independent course, voting for men and measures rather 
than for party. He has been a member of the Chicago Undertakers Association since 
he started in the business and for the past two years has served as a member of its 
executive committee. He is widely and favorably known in professional circles as 
well as to the general public and his sterling traits of manhood and of citizenship 
have gained for him the warm and kindly regard of friends, neighbors and associates. 



RALPH CLARKSON. 



As an artist and promoter of art interests in Chicago Ralph Clarkson needs 
no introduction to his fellow townsmen, but the life history of one who has attained 
distinction in a chosen field is always of interest to the general public and the work 
which Mr. Clarkson has done to further art development in Chicago both as artist 
and instrvictor has made his life history of vital significance to the city. He was 
born in Amesbury, Massachusetts, August 3, 1861, a son of Joseph True and Susan 
(Watson) Clarkson, the former a carriage manufacturer. His paternal ancestors 
were Scotch and came to America in 1718, when two brothers settled in Ports- 
mouth, New Hampshire. They had been members of the Pretender's army and 
brought with them the colors of their regiment, which one of their descendants some 
years ago presented to the Wisconsin Historical Society. 

Ralph Clarkson was educated in the Amesbury (Mass.) High school and his 
native artistic ability was early manifest. In his school days he was called upon 
to decorate the blackboards when any special celebration was to take place and 
his desire to one day enter West Point was early overcome by the stronger inherent 
desire of becoming an artist. Early in 1880 he went to Boston and entered the 
office of James R. Osgood & Company as a draftsman. In 1882 he became a student 
in the Museum of Fine Arts of that city, where he remained until 1884, when he 
went to Paris, entering Julians Academy under Boulanger and Lefevre. He applied 
himself diligently to art studies until 1887, in which year his work won recognition 
by being placed in the Salon. 

Returning to America in that year, Mr. Clarkson resided for a short period 
in Hartford, Connecticut, but finally established a studio in New York city. On 
the 15th of January, 1890, he married Miss Fanny Rose Calhoun of Hartford, 
Connecticut, a daughter of Judge David S. Calhoun, who for many years was on 
the Connecticut bench, while her brother is also a well known lawyer, and the 
family was intimately connected with the early history of that state. Mr. and 
Mrs. Clarkson resided in New York until 1892, when they went abroad, spending 
two years in Paris and one in Italy, returning to the United States in 1895. Mr. 
Clarkson devoted his time during that period to further study as well as to paint- 
ing, thus advancing the efficiency which had already established his reputation as 
one of America's foremost artists. In December following his return he visited 
Chicago and found the social atmosphere here so congenial that he decided to remain 
and has since been a resident of the Lake city. 

Mr. Clarkson has not only maintained a studio from which he has sent out 
some of the notable works of art but has always been actively interested in all 
public art movements, putting forth zealous and earnest effort to promote the ai*t 



30 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

development of Chicago. He is president of the Art Commission of this city and 
also of the Art Commission of the state of Illinois. He has been president of the 
Chicago Society of Artists, the Arts and Craft Society and has been called upon 
frequentW to serve as juror on art exhibits, acting as a member of the jury for 
the art section at the Paris Exposition of 1900 and at the Louisiana Purchase Ex- 
position of St. Louis in 190i. He was also a member of the International Jury of 
Awards at St. Louis in the same year and has recently been made a member of the 
painting jury of the American Federation of Arts at Washington, D. C. He is 
teaching painting as one of the Art Institute faculty and he was one of the founders 
of the Friends of American Art. He is president of the Municipal Art League 
and associate of the National Academy of Design, New York, 1911. He was also 
one of the organizers and is the secretary of the Cliif-I>wellers, is a member of 
The Little Room and of the Illinois Athletic Club. Wisely and conscientiously 
developing the talents with which nature endowed him, he stands today among those 
who are giving an individuality to American art, his work winning notable recognition 
not only in the United States but also in the art centers of Europe. 



H. H. PORTER. 



The life pathway of H. H. Porter was never strewn with the wreck of other 
men's fortunes. His was a constructive genius, he builded and that which he 
builded was of great benefit to his fellowmen. Chicago had not completed two 
decades after the incorporation of the city Avhen he became one of her residents 
and here found a field for his S2>lendid powers of organization that resulted in 
the attainment of notable success for himself, but more than that constituted a 
most potent element in the upbuilding of this city and in the development of the 
Mississippi valley. Active in the building and management of railroads, he opened 
up large tracts of country so that its natural resources were brought into close 
connection with the markets of the world. The value and worth of such a service 
is immeasurable, for in its far reaches it touches every departinent of business 
activity and achieves results which otherwise could never be accomplished. 

Henry H. Porter was born December 7, 1835, in the little seaport town of 
Machias, in Washington county, Maine, his parents being Rufus King and Lucy 
(Hedge) Porter, the former a native of the Pine Tree state and the latter of 
Cape Cod, Massachusetts. His father was an able lawyer and of considerable 
prominence both professionally and politically. In a home of intellectual culture 
and natural refinement the son spent his youthful days and his environment de- 
veloped in him the traits of character that made him ever a most honorable and 
upright man. Throughout his career he had no false standards of life. He was 
taught to regard any honest labor as worthy of respect and when at the age of 
fifteen years he put aside his text-books to enter business circles he sought and 
secured a position as clerk in a country store at Eastport, Maine. A little more 
than a year passed and he then directed his steps westward. It was his intention 
to go to St. Louis and eventually to California, but acting upon his father's advice 
he made his way to Chicago, then a growing and flourishing city of about forty 
thousand inhabitants. A lad of sixteen years, Avhat did the future hold in store 




H. H. I'ORTER 



THE NEW YCiv,. 

PUDLIC LIBI1AR.Y 



AS'l'oi:, l.KN'O; AND 
TXUEa KULNDATiU.NS 

U L 



^ CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 33 

for him? He already possessed a considerable knowledge of business and accounts, 
and moreover there was about him an alert^ enterprising air that at once attracted 
favorable attention. He obtained a situation and made his initial step in business 
activity in this city as a clerk in the office of the Galena & Chicago Union Railroad 
Company, of which John B. Turner, one of the pioneer railroad builders of the 
west, was then president. This road, now one of the main divisions of the North- 
western railway system, was then but seventy-five miles in length and the track 
for thirty miles out of Chicago was laid with scrap iron that had previously been 
used on what is now the New York Central Railroad between Rochester and 
Niagara Falls. From that time until the close of his active business career Mr, 
Porter was interested almost continuously in the construction and management of 
railroads tributary to Chicago. There were then only six railway lines entering 
the city and but two of these, the Chicago & Rock Island and the Galena & Chi- 
cago Union extended west of the city. There were no lines beyond the Mississippi 
and no connecting road between Chicago and St. Louis or Chicago and Milwaukee. 
Mr. Porter entered upon his duties at a salary of four hundred dollars per 
year and made his home in a little frame dwelling that stood on Randolph, just 
east of State street. His diligence, determination and loyalty soon won him pro- 
motions, to the position of paymaster, claim agent and general ticket agent. He 
remained with the Galena & Chicago Union until 1860, when he resigned to accept 
the position of station agent in Chicago for the Michigan Southern & Northern 
Indiana Railroad, now a part of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern system, its 
line then extending from Chicago to Toledo and Detroit. Rapid advancement 
through intermediate positions in three years made him general superintendent 
when but twenty-seven years of age. He held the office through the period of 
the Civil war and was active in transporting troops and supplies to the Union 
armies. His first promotion with this road made him general freight agent and 
in 1863 he became general superintendent, thus serving until 1865 and enjoying 
the distinction of being the youngest superintendent of an important railroad in 
the United States. In 1866 he formed a partnership with Jesse Spalding for 
the manufacture of lumber in northern Wisconsin and the upper peninsula of 
Michigan. There was an extraordinary demand for manufactured lumber and 
the mills of the firm reached an average annual output of thirty million feet. Mr. 
Porter's business affiliations still remained in Chicago and by degrees he became 
connected with a number of important corporations in this city, including the First 
National Bank in which he held a position on the directorate from 1867 until 1891, 
contributing in no small measure through his sound judgment and keen discrim- 
ination to the success of the institution. In 1868 he became a director of the 
Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway Company and continuously until his last 
years extended his railway connections in the construction and management of 
railway lines which opened up the west and northwest and made Chicago the 
railway center of America. He was elected to the directorate of the Chicago & 
Northwestern Railway Companj' about 1870 and was general manager of the 
road from 1871 imtil 1876, and about the same time he became a director of the 
Union Pacific Railroad. One of the railroad operations in which he was concerned 
was the development of the West W^isconsin Railroad, purchased by Mr. Porter 
and his associates in 1875. He was president of the reorganized company and 
owing to his wise administration and executive force, during a period of seven 



34 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

j^ears, this road, under the name of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha 
Railroad, by construction and consolidation became a line of more than twelve 
hundred and fift\' miles of railroad. The Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha 
Railroad was purchased and in 1882 the latter corporation, through the efforts 
of Mr. Porter and his associates, pursued a similar course with the St. Paul & 
Duluth Railroad. As president of the reorganized road Mr. Porter raised it to 
a high state of efficiency and made it a most valuable property, retiring from the 
presidency when this vras accomjilished. When it seemed that the Chicago & 
Great Southern Railroad would go into bankruptcy Mr. Porter and his associates 
purchased the line in 1886 and reorganized it under the name of the Chicago & 
Indiana Coal Railway Company, extending the line to Brazil, Indiana. They 
also consolidated Avith the Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad, which they pur- 
chased, and developed the united corporations under the name of the Chicago & 
Eastern Illinois Railroad, now one of the important lines entering Chicago. 

Mr. Porter was one of the prominent factors in the development of the iron 
and steel industries of Illinois. Following the failure of the United Iron & Steel 
Company of Chicago he and several others purchased the entire property, brought 
new capital and management into it and resumed business under a new organiza- 
tion known as the Union Steel Company. After its rebuilding the plant became 
successful and afterwards by consolidation with the North Chicago and Joliet 
Steel Companies became a part of the Illinois Steel Company, the largest steel 
rail manufacturing enterj^rise in the world. Mr. Porter was a leading spirit in 
developing and promoting the extensive iron properties known as the Minnesota 
Iron ComjDany and the Duluth Iron Range Railroad in Minnesota. 

Mr. Porter later made a further consolidation of the Illinois Steel Company, 
the Minnesota Iron Company, the Duluth & Iron Range Railroad Company, the 
Minnesota Steamship Company and the Lorain Steel Company, thereby forming 
the Federal Steel Company, of which he was chairman of the board of directors 
until by further consolidation that company became a part of the United States 
Steel Corporation. After the formation of the United States Steel Corporation 
Mr. Porter retired from the steel business, refusing an election to the board of 
directors of the United States Steel Corporation, although he was strongly urged 
to become a director of the corporation. In his business affairs Mr. Porter was 
closely associated -with a group of New York men including Governor R. P. Flower, 
D. O. Mills, David Dows, Benjamin Brewster, Heber R, Bishop and R. R. Cable 
of Chicago. 

In 1861 Mr. Porter was also prominently concerned in laying out and devel- 
oping the present stock-yards of Chicago. He was a large factor in the reorgan- 
ization and financing of the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company of Brooklyn, also 
the organizer of the Chicago Transfer & Clearing Company and its associated 
company, the Chicago Union Transfer Railway Company. This company's clear- 
ing yards for freight traffic embodied his ideas for the settlement of Chicago's 
freight problems, and was the only one of his enterprises in which he maintained 
an active interest until the time of his death. He continued its president from 
its inception until his demise. 

One who kncAv him intimately for more than a quarter of a century said of him 
while he was still living; "Mr. Porter is a man of quick perceptions, possessing 
a mind that is particularly adapted tc organization on a large scale. The analytic 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 35 

quality of his mind enabled him to judge with remarkable accuracy and rapidity. 
The most complicated problems coming before him are reduced to their simple 
elements with extraordinary facility and the true nature and relationship of the 
several parts perceived as if by magic. He is one of those rare men who have 
confidence in their final conclusions. Having decided upon what is to be done 
he proceeds straightway to its accomplishment, pursuing with relentless energy 
the object for which he strives. Among the railroad men of the country he ranks 
as one of the brightest of the age in the business." 

On the 8th of December, 1865, Mr. Porter was married to Miss Eliza T. 
French, a daughter of George H. French, of Chicago. They became the parents 
of three children: Katharine, the wife of Dr. George S. Isham; H. H., Jr.; and 
George F. Porter. The death of ISIr. Porter occurred on the 31st of March, 1910. 
He had continued his residence in Chicago until 1898, when he removed to New 
York for the better supervision of his interests, although he maintained a home 
at Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, and there spent the summer months. 

Pie never took a salary for any position that he held after 1880, nor did he 
receive any compensation for his services in connection with any of the interests 
he worked for excejJting such as came to him naturally as his interest as a stock- 
holder or owner in the property, and which he was always particular should be 
on the same basis as that of every other owner. Although constantly at the head 
of various corporations in which he was interested, and devoting thereto his 
whole time and energies, he preferred to be independent. He was well known in 
the club circle of Chicago, becoming one of the early members of the Commercial, 
Chicago and Union Clubs, and later of the Mid-Day and Saddle and Cycle Clubs. 
In New York his membership was with the Metropolitan Club. He never courted 
public attention but the extent and importance of his business affairs made him 
prominent. 

At his death the Chicago Tribune said editorially: "H. H. Porter was one 
of Chicago's constructive captains of industry. His faith in the future of the 
city and its contributing territory gave him a wide outlook, a review of his life 
as the curtain falls reveals the familiar combination of the wonderful opportunity 
afforded by the rapidly expanding west and the industry and observant skill of 
an energetic son of the east. Not every New Englander who 'went west' made 
good. But where the man and the opportunity were rightly joined, as in Mr. 
Porter's case, results were certain. The directorates of the Rock Island, North- 
western, the Omaha, Eastern Illinois and Union Pacific railroads as well as many 
others profited by his intelligent interest. He was a master builder. His eye was 
quick to see the possibilities and his constructive mind soon made visions realities. 
Railroad building, exploiting iron and steel, studying and solving problems of 
transportation, seeking relief from congestion of freight traffic, finding economies 
through wise combinations and union of endeavor, he had large share in the devel- 
opment of organizations which will long profit because of his business sense and 
administrative skill. For fifty-seven years he has been a factor in Chicago's busi- 
ness life, winning success for himself, but while advancing his own interests laying- 
deep and broad foundations upon which others will build to the glory of Chicago 
and the improvement of the middle west. By inspiring others with his own faith 
he has made himself a citizen to be mourned as a life covering more than the 
allotted three score vears and ten is ended." 



36 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

At the same time the following editorial apjiearcd in the Chicago Evening Post: 

"In 1853 Henry H. Porter liad the vision to see Chicago, with its six puny 
little railroads, grown into the great transportation center of our inland empire. 
Fifty years later he had the vision to foresee the inevitable coming of an age 
■when successful railroading must depend upon a far higher coefficient of economy 
and efficiency in terminals and transfers. 

"It is perhaps characteristic of our race that this imaginative energy should 
run strong in age as well as youth. But Mr. Porter possessed it always in un- 
usual quality and power. His mind was free from the first moment when he 
shook his shoulders out above the crowd. His ability to create, to reorganize, to 
expand, found full j^lay because he kept his horizon resolutely unnarrowed. 

"And the record of his service in building the great middle west is wonderful 
even in this country where one generation had to do the pioneering work accom- 
plished in an older civilization bj' the slow growth of centuries. Great railroad 
systems show today the impress of his hand ; important steamship lines and vast 
shipbuilding com^Danies bear witness to his achievements ; the United States Steel 
Corporation, the leader of all our corporate legion, preserves his constructive ideals 
in its fundamental make-up. Iron and coal mines, coke ovens, lumber lands and 
stockyards, from Minnesota to Pittsburgh, owe their development to his power to 
see and foresee. 

"Mr. Porter never denied to the city in which he lived aid and encouragement 
in any of the many efforts made for her betterment. His public spirit was a very 
real thing, expressed not in words but in deeds. 

"Taken all in all Henrj^ H. Porter was among the most powerful as well as 
among the quietest and least known of the 'big men' of Chicago. His life work 
bore upon the growth of the city to a degree comparable with that of George M, 
Pullman or Philip D. Armour. His judgment, constantly sought by men charged 
with the weight of great affairs, was a jiotcnt and active force in our history. 
Only after he is gone will the community be able to form a true idea of the value 
and influence of his life." 



JOHN T. KELLY. 



John T. Kelly, for twelve years engaged in the undertaking business in Chicago, 
his native city, was born May 19, 1879. a son of John H. and Margaret (Carbery) 
Kelly, the former born in Athens, New York, June 1, 1854, and the latter in Chicago. 
The mother's death occurred June 1, 1890. The father was a son of Malachi Kelly, 
who brought his family to Chicago in 1856, when the city bore little resemblance to 
the metropolis of the present. He turned his attention to railway business, with 
w^hich he was connected vmtil 1902, when he entered the undertaking business in 
association with J. D. Dorran. Later he became connected with his son, John T., 
in business. In his family were five children: Malachi, who is employed as a con- 
ductor on the Santa Fe Railroad; John T.. of this review; Laura and Josephine, at 
home; and William, who is freight agent with the Chicago River & Indiana Railway 
in Chicago. Since the mother's death Mrs. Rose Kelly, wife of Mr. Kelly's brother, 
has presided over the household and cared for the children. 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 37 

John T. Kelly acquired a public school education and in his youthful days worked 
at the painter's trade for a time. He afterward followed in his father's footsteps by 
becoming connected with railway interests, to which he devoted eleven years of his 
life. At length, however, he determined to engage in the undertaking business and 
entered the Baker & McConnaughey School of Embalming, in which he pursued a 
full course and was graduated. He has been identified with the undertaking business 
since 1905, conducting his interests at No. 2616 West Thirty-eighth street. In 1912 
he erected a building there and is well equij^ped for carrying on the business. His 
building contains a chapel with a seating capacity of forty-five and he has his own 
motor equipment for automobile service in the conduct of funerals. He has been a 
member of the Chicago Undertakers Association since he became identified with the 
business and was made a member of its executive committee in 1916. His building 
has a frontage of forty-three and a half feet and is two stories in height. He also 
owns a garage and is well equipped to take care of funerals in the most satisfactory 
manner. His business has steadily grown owing to the satisfaction of his patrons and 
has reached very substantial jjrojjortions. 

Mr. Kelly is a member of St. Agnes Catholic church. He also has membership 
in the Catholic Order of Foresters and the Knights of Columbus and likewise with 
the Knights of The Maccabees and the Fraternal Mystic Circle and the Brotherhood 
of Railway Trainmen. In several of these organizations he has been called to office. 
He served as treasurer of the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen, has been an official 
in the Knights of Columbus and j^resident of the Fraternal Mystic Circle. He is 
well known in these different organizations and his social qualities, in addition to his 
loyalty to the purposes of the societies, have made him popular in their membership. 



A. C. CALDWELL. 



A. C. Caldwell, who since 1903 has been engaged in the drug business in Pull- 
man, where he has promoted interests of large importance in that line, is also an 
active and representative public-s^jirited citizen, keenly alive to the possibilities of 
the city, and he works steadily for its further development and improvement. A 
native of Canada, he was born on the 11th of May, 1874, and is a son of John and 
Margaret Caldwell, who were farming people. He pursued a high school education 
in his native country and afterward took up the profession of teaching, which he 
followed for two years in Canada. He then determined to cross the border into the 
United States with its keener competition but its advancement more quickly secured. 
He came to Chicago in 1899 and, having had four years' previous experience in 
pharmacy work, he here entered the employ of S. C. Yeomans, who was conducting 
a drug store at Thirty-fourth and State streets. He remained in Mr. Yeoman's 
employ for three years and afterward accepted the position of manager of a store 
at Sixty-third and Wentworth streets, continuing there for a few months. On the 
1st of January, 1903, he arrived in Pullman to accept the position of manager of the 
Foundry Pharmacy, where he remained till this store was sold by its owners, C. M. 
Campbell & Son. In 1907 he purchased a fourth interest in the Market Pharmacy 
from his former employers, C. M. Campbell & Son, and has since acquired the entire 
business. He was ambitious to engage in business on his own account and utilized 



38 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

every opportunity leading to that end. At length he felt that his experience was 
sufficient and his industry and economy had brought him sufficient capital to 
acquire an interest in the store as indicated. This business had been established 
by T. P. Struhsacker in 1891 and was located in the Market building, which 
was destroyed by fire in 1893 but was rebuilt the same year. The Market 
building is one of the historic structures of Pullman. Mr. Caldwell is now 
proprietor of the best drug store in Pullman and has develoi^ed a business of 
large and gratifying proportions. He carries an extensive and well selected line 
of drugs and druggists' sundries and the methods which he employs in the conduct 
of his house have ensured to him a liberal patronage. He is ever courteous to his 
patrons, straightforward in his dealings and progressive in his methods. 

In 1902 Mr. Caldwell was united in marriage to Miss Emma Smith, a daughter 
of Alvis Smith and a native of West Virginia. Mr. Caldwell holds membership with 
the Masonic fraternity, belonging to Standard Lodge, No. 873, A. F. & A. M., and 
Pullman Chapter, No. SO^, R. A. M., of which he is a past high priest. His political 
allegiance is given to the republican party and he is an active worker in its interests 
but has never been a candidate for office. He stands for public progress and advance- 
ment at all times, however, and is ever willing to lend his aid and co-operation to 
measures for the general good. This is evidenced in the fact that he is now the 
president of the Pullman Improvement Association and he is also a member of the 
South End Business Men's Association. Along the line of his trade he has become 
well known, holding membership in the Chicago Retail Druggists Association, in 
which for several years he served on the executive board, while in 1917 he was 
elected to the presidency. He is also a member of the National Association of Retail 
Druggists and a member of the American Pharmaceutical and the Illinois Pharma- 
ceutical Associations. He enjoys the high regard of colleagues and contemporaries 
in the profession and at all times he does everything in his power to advance the 
standards of the drug trade, while in the conduct of his own establishment he renders 
to the public most efficient service. While he possesses the laudable ambition of 
attaining a competence, he has never allowed business to so monopolize his time that 
he has had no chance to aid in public affairs, but has ever recognized his duties of 
citizenship and has put forth earnest and effective effort for the general welfare. 



EDWARD L. DUNSTAN. 

Edward L. Dunstan established an undertaking business in Chicago in 1888 at 
796 W^est Madison street. He has since remained at the same location, although in 
the renumbering of the city streets his location is known as 2015 West Madison street. 
The name of Dunstan has become a synonym of satisfactory service to all who have 
emjDloyed him and the good words spoken of him by his patrons have won to him a 
constantly increasing patronage. He was born in Hamilton, Canada, in 1857, a son 
of Robert W. and Eliza H. (Distin) Dunstan, the latter a daughter of William L. 
Distin, who was mayor of Hamilton, Canada. Born in England, on crossing the 
Atlantic, he made his way to the United States and was owner of a steamer on the 
Ohio river but afterward removed to Canada. In the late '50s Robert W. Dunstan 
established his family in St. Louis, where he engaged in the mortgage and loan 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 39 

ousiness. In 1869 he became a resident of Chicago, where he joined his brothers 
in the dry goods business, but their establishment was destroyed in the great con- 
flagration of October, 1871. After the fire he became connected with the branch 
store of the firm at Racine, Wisconsin. There were five brothers associated in the 
mercantile business, having several stores. In the year 1880 Robert W. Dunstan 
lost his life by drowning in the Tallahatchie river in Mississippi. His widow sur- 
vived him for almost thirty-five years and departed this life January 15, IQli, at the 
notable old age of ninety-three years. 

Liberal educational opportunities were accorded Edward L. Dunstan and after 
attending the Chicago University he entered the dry goods business in connection 
with his father and subsequently became identified with the Chicago Title & Trust 
Company, thus becoming well known in connection with financial interests of the 
city. He entered the undertaking business in 1888, opening an establishment at 796 
West Madison street, and through all the intervening years he has carried on busi- 
ness at the same place, his store being twenty-five by sixty feet. He has a chapel 
there and has auto equipment for the conduct of the business. For many years he 
has been a member of the Chicago Undertakers Association, of which at one time he 
served as treasurer. 

In 1897 Mr. Dunstan was married to Miss Anna K. Cooke, of Kincardine, Canada, 
who is a well known short story writer for the Daily News. Mr. Dunstan is prom- 
inently known in Masonic circles, belonging to Garfield Lodge, Xo. 686, A. F. & A. M. ; 
St. Cecelia Chapter, Xo. 220, R. A. M.; Columbia Commandery, K. T. ; and to the 
Mystic Shrine. He is also identified with I Will Lodge, Xo. 141, I. O. O. F., of 
which he has been treasurer for the past twenty-three years. His membershijD con- 
nections likewise extend to Royal Oak Lodge X'o. 400 of the Sons of St. George, to 
Umatilla Court of the Independent Order of Foresters, to Madison Lodge of the 
Columbian Knights, the Knights of Pythias and the Chicago Anglers Club. He is 
also a member of St. Andrew's Episcopal church, in which he is a past vestryman, 
and his political allegiance is given to the republican party, which he stanchly sup- 
ports at the jiolls, but he has never sought office as a reward for party fealty. Those 
who know him, and he has a wide acquaintance, esteem him as a man of genuine worth 
and he has an extensive circle of friends throughout the western section of the city 
and in fact throughout the entire limits of Chicago, where from early boyhood he has 
made his home. 



JOHN W^ILLIAM SCOTT. 

Among those who are dominating figiires in the mercantile circles of Chicago 
is numbered John William Scott, a partner in the great dry-goods establishment 
of Carson, Pirie, Scott & Company. He was born at Ottawa, Illinois. March 24, 
1870, and is a son of John Edwin and Harriet Emma (Hossack) Scott. At the 
usual age he began his education which he continued through successive grades in 
the public and high schools of his native city, finishing with a year's study in 
Brown Universitj^ of Rhode Island. He was a young man of nineteen years when 
he became connected with the house in which he is now a partner. The business 
was established in 1854 and has become one of the most reliable and substantial 



40 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

mercantile enterprises of the country. On the 1st day of January, 1901, he Avas 
admitted to partnership and has since been actively identified with its progress. 
Extensive wholesale and retail establishments are maintained and the latter draws 
its patronage from among Chicago's most substantial residences, while the former 
reaches out in its ramifying trade interests to all sections of the country. The 
business is conducted along the most modern and progressive lines and furnishes 
to the patrons not only the most attractive articles of American manufacture but 
the leading importations as well. The business has been carefully systematized so 
that with a minimum expenditure of time and labor, maximum results are achieved. 
An attractive home life had its beginning in the marriage at Troy, New York, 
October 3. 1899, of John W. Scott to Miss Emily Cluett, a daughter of Robert 
Cluett. They have two daughters, Elizabeth and Barbara. The family residence 
is maintained at Hubbard Woods, Illinois. j\Ir. Scott holds membersliip with the 
Chicago Club, the University Club, the City Club, the Onwentsia Club, the Saddle 
and Cycle Club, and is also identified with organized movements for the development 
of trade interests, business connections and municipal progress jDut forth by the 
Commercial Club to which he also belongs. 



FRANK H. KETCHAM. 



Frank H. Ketcham, a member of the Illinois undertakers' examining board and 
one who has ever stood for the highest standards of the profession, enjoys the sincere 
regard of his business colleagues and contemporaries as is shown in the fact that he 
has been honored Avith the presidency of both the Chicago Undertakers Association 
and the State Undertakers Association. He was born in West Chicago, DuPage 
county, Illinois, ]\Iarch 9, 1856, his parents being Emanuel H. and Jane A. 
(Sherman) Ketcham. The father removed from Pennsylvania to Illinois in 1854 
and engaged in business as a millwright, but both he and his wife have now passed 
away. 

Frank H. Ketcham acquired a public school education and after his textbooks 
were put aside devoted twenty years to the telegrai:)h business, acting as a messenger 
boy for the Western Union at the time of the Chicago fire in 1871. He gradually 
worked his way upward in that connection and became telegraph operator at the 
stock yards. He was afterward for six years manager for the Baltimore & Ohio 
Telegraph Company, which subsequently consolidated with the Western Union, and 
he served for five years as postmaster of the stock yards postal station under Presi- 
dent Harrison. He has been in the undertaking business since 1896, in which year 
he opened an establishment at No. 719 Garfield boulevard. In 1914 he leased other 
space in the same building, which is situated at the corner of Halsted street and 
Garfield boulevard, his present number being 5509 South Halsted. He has a well 
appointed chapel with seating capacity for seventy people, has motor equiioment 
and an undertaking establishment Avhich is well appointed in every particular. Since 
turning his attention to this business he has been a member of the Chicago Under- 
takers Association and was elected to the presidency and was afterward chosen 
president of the state association. He served as chairman of the executive com- 
mittee of the National Association and for a number of years acted as a member of 




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CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 43 

the transportation committee, which is one of the most important of the association. 
He is at the present time third vice president of the National Funeral Directors 
Association. Moreover, he has taken an active part in promoting legislation per- 
taining to the profession and served on the legislative committee of the state associa- 
tion for many years. He has also served on the board of examiners for the state 
since the law was passed requiring such a board. He has ever held to the highest 
professional standards and believes in exacting a degree of proficiency that will 
render the best possible service and promote the most sanitar}^ conditions. 

In 1881 Mr. Ketcham was united in marriage to Miss Ella F, Knight, of Boston, 
Massachusetts, and their children are: Nessie, who is the wife of Harvey F. Stadle, 
of Blue Island, Illinois; Olive, deceased; Edna, the wife of Ellis D. Cauble, who is 
associated with Mr. Ketcham in business ; Mattie J., the wife of Arthur W. Sherlock, 
also a resident of Chicago ; and Frank H., Jr., who is in business with his father 
and who married Frances Follich, of Saybrook, Illinois. 

Mr. Ketcham is prominently known in Masonic circles. He belongs to Boulevard 
Lodge, No. 882, A. F. & A. M. ; to Delta Chapter, No. 91, R. A. M.; Temple 
Council, No. 191, R. & S. M.; Mizpah Commandery, No. 83, K. T.; and Medina 
Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He likewise has membership in Columbia Chapter, 
No. 210, O. E. S. He belongs to Golden Rod Lodge of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and Pinzon Lodge, No. 1, of the Order of Columbia Circle. His 
political endorsement is given to the republican party, to which he gives stalwart 
supjDort at the polls but has never been an office seeker. His religious faith is 
indicated by his membership in the Methodist churcli. Those who know him, and 
he has a wide acquaintance, esteem him highly. He is a "good mixer," or in other 
words has a social, genial disposition and an unfailing courtesy that make him 
popular with his fellowmen. 



WASHINGTON HESING. 

It was not alone in one field that Washington Hesing left the impress of his 
individuality upon Chicago, her public thought and activities. The breadth of 
his own knowledge was constantly reflected in the policy of the Staats Zeitung 
and the measures which were advocated in its columns. He studied questions of 
vital import from the standj^oint of the statesman and of the jjractical man of 
affairs, and his ideas contained elements of interest and instruction to the former 
as well as to the latter. In the forces which worked for civic righteousness, for 
political integrity and municipal progress he was a potent factor and his life record 
added luster to the untarnished family name of Hesing which had become familiar 
to the citizens of Chicago as borne by his father, Anthony C. Hesing. Of German 
nativity, the father was born in the grand duchy of Oldenburg, Germany, in 
1823, and, left an orphan at the age of fifteen years, started out in the world 
alone, meeting with severe treatment from an unjust guardian who apprenticed 
him to the trade of a baker and brewer and two years later gave him from his 
patrimony of one thousand thalers a sufficient sum to pay his passage to America, 
leaving him with a capital of only five dollars with which to begin life in the new 
world. His indebtedness amounted to five dollars Avhen he reached Cincinnati, 

Vol. IV— 3 



44 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

but he at once sought and obtained employment, acting as clerk in a grocery store 
in that city for two years, and in the meantime saved from his earnings a sufficient 
amount to enable him to begin business on his own account in 18i2. Success 
attended him through the ensuing six years and he then sold his store in order 
to erect a hotel, of which he remained proprietor until 1854. In the latter year 
he became a resident of Chicago and was associated with Charles P. Dole in the 
brick manufacturing business until the wide-spread financial panic of 1857 made 
him a victim. His fellow townsmen, however, appreciative of his ability and 
fidelity in citizenship, elected him on the republican ticket to the office of county 
sheriff in 1860 and upon the close of his two years' term, in 1862, he purchased 
from Mr. Hoeffgen his interest in the Staats Zeitung, of which he assumed the 
business management. The purchase of the interest of Lorenz Brentano made him 
sole proprietor in 1867, and he thus continued until 1871, when he was joined in 
business by his son, Washington Hesing, father and son remaining the chief factors 
in shaping the policy and molding the destiny of the paper until called from this life. 

Anthony C. Hesing was for many years perhaps the most prominent of the 
German-American citizens of Chicago. He was the first representative of his nation 
to hold an important elective office in the state, and while acting as sheriff he did 
much for his adopted country in recruiting soldiers for the Union, taking active 
part in the organization of the Twenty-fourth and Eighty-second Infantry Regi- 
ments and Chambeck's Dragoons. On becoming a naturalized American citizen 
he supported the whig party and while still residing in Ohio was made a mem- 
ber of the Hamilton county committee of that party. His position on all vital 
questions was that of leadership and his attitude that of reform. He Avatched with 
the keenest interest the shaping of events that preceded and followed the outbreak 
of the Civil war, becoming an advocate of the republican party on its organization^ 
and when the work of reconstruction commenced was found on the radical side 
of the question. His labors were regarded as a resultant factor in the winning of 
republican victories during the congressional campaign of 1866, but he never 
sought office for himself. It was after this that he turned his attention to jour- 
nalism, sparing neither time, labor nor expense in improving the paper. Having 
a clear, powerful and patriotic purpose, and being careful withal to reflect as well 
as guide the jDublic sentiment of his country, all who knew him came to respect 
his opinions and heed his suggestions. Aside from his connection with the Staats 
Zeitung he was one of the promoters of the Schiller Theater and also active in 
the building and support of the Home for the Aged at Altenheim. A. C. Hesing^ 
took a leading part in the affairs of this institution and his interest therein was 
keen and constant. He gave liberally to charity and benevolent work, vet never 
ostentatiously. His -wife died in 1886. He lived in comparative retirement after 
her death but his last act was writing an article for publication in the Staats 
Zeitung over his oa\ti signature, when his feelings were deeply aroused by reading* 
of the act of the city council in passing another boodle franchise ordinance, !March 
30, 1895. Then death came. His last utterance breathed forth the patriotic spirit 
which was ever the expression of his attachment to his adopted land. 

Upon a visit to his native land in 1847 Anthony C. Hesing married I<ouisa 
Lamping, whom he brought as his bride to the United States, establishing their 
home in Cincinnati. There on the 14th of Mav, 1849, the birth of Washington 
Hesing occurred. His parents, realizing the value of education, saw to it that 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 45 

he attended school, nor was he loath to do this, until 1861. He then visited Europe 
and following his return became a student in the University of St. Mary's of the 
Lake, where he remained until July, 1863. He afterward spent a year in study 
in the University of Chicago and also prepared for admission to Yale College un- 
der the direction of Dr. Quackenboss. He entered the universitj'^ at New Haven 
in 1866, pursuing a classical course and winning the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
upon his graduation in June, 1870. Even yet his education was not considered 
complete, for he went abroad, spending some time in attending lectures in Berlin 
and Heidelberg Universities, devoting himself to the study of political economy, 
international law and science of government, history and German literature. When 
the great fire of October, 1871, destroyed his father's office and printing establish- 
ment, Washington Hesing deemed it his duty to return home, and from that time 
forward until his death was an active factor in the management of the Illinois 
Staats Zeitung. This is known as the most powerful German-American paper in 
the country with possibly the exception of the New York Staats Zeitimg. Although 
the plant was destroyed by fire in 1871. the publication of the paper was resumed 
a few days later under control of A. C. Hesing and Herman Roster. Sixteen 
months after the fire the Zeitung was housed in a substantial building that had 
been erected at the corner of Fifth avenue and Washington streets. In 1880 Mr. 
Roster retired from the ownership, at which time A. C. and Washington Hesing 
became sole proprietors and publishers. The son assumed the position of manag- 
ing editor at that time and so remained until his demise. His study abroad as 
well as his nationality had given him an understanding of the German nature and 
through the columns of his paper he addressed himself to the public in such man- 
ner that the Zeitung became one of the most influential papers in molding public 
opinion among the German-American citizens of the middle west. 

From the time he attained his majority Mr. Hesing was recognized as one of 
the 3'oung leaders in political circles in this city. He was but twenty-three years 
of age when he distinguished himself by a series of eloquent addresses delivered 
in both the English and German languages, in which he championed the cause of 
General U. S. Grant, then a candidate for the presidency. He was but twenty- 
three years of age when he was appointed a member of the board of education and 
he would have been reappointed by Mayor Joseph Medill had he not refused to 
continue longer in the office. While serving on the board he was made a member 
of the committee on German and in a report of that committee advocated the sys- 
tem of grading the German studies as the English were graded. This report 
was adopted by the board and the proposed system has since that time been in 
practice. In August, 1880, he was chosen a member of the county board of 
education. In the meantime his political views had undergone a change. No 
longer in sympathy with the principles and policy of the republican party, he es- 
poused the cause of the democracy and remained thereafter an advocate of its 
platform, although bitter partisanship was never a factor in his political activity. 
He was actuated first of all by a desire for good government and for freedom 
from misrule in municipal affairs, and manifested the strong strain of patriotic 
attachment to the interests of the nation that had been one of his faher's marked 
characteristics. During President Cleveland's second administration he was ap- 
pointed postmaster of Chicago in 1894 and served until his resigiiation in 1898. 
His administration was one of the most able, progressive and businesslike in the 



46 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

history of that office and he might be called the father of the present main post- 
office building in Chicago. It was largely through his tireless effort and per- 
sonal labor both in Washington and Chicago that the project of a new structure 
was carried through. As evidence of his high standing an incident may be related. 
Soon after his resignation he was one of a body of prominent Chicago citizens 
attending a meeting in Nashville, Tennessee, at which President and Mrs. William 
McKinley were also present. ^Slr. Hesing, being an acquaintance of the president, 
was introduced to Mrs. McKinley as "the former postmaster of Chicago who 
could have remained in the office had he so desired." Mr. Hesing resigned the 
office during President McKinley 's administration and hence the significance of the 
president's comment. He was the originator of the substation plan in connection 
with the Chicago postoffice. 

On the 6th of July, 1870, Mr. Hesing was married to Miss Henrietta Candee 
Weir, a daughter of Samuel and Adeline (Candee) Weir, of New Haven, Con- 
necticut. Her father became associated with General Humphrey in the manufac- 
ture of broadclotli at Humphreysville, now Seymour, Connecticut. It was the first 
undertaking of this kind, in the country and Mr. Weir manufactured the inauguration 
suit of President Jackson, made of broadcloth, receiving fifty dollars in gold for 
it. He was a son of Samuel Weir, Sr., who was one of Washington's body-guard 
in the Revolutionary war and resided in Fairfield, Connecticut. The early ancestors 
of the Weir and Candee families were active and prominent in shaping the histor^y 
of New England during the formative and later periods. The Candees were of 
French descent and the Weirs of Scotch lineage. 

The death of Washington Hesing occurred on the 18th of December, 1897. 
For a great many years he had been managing editor for the Staats Zeitung, 
which had been made a most influential force among the German-American citizens 
in support of reform, progress and improvement. Aside from his efltorts in support 
of good government through the columns of his jiaper, INIr. Hesing did much in a 
private capacity to uphold the interests of city and nation. He served as president 
of the Garfield Park Association and was a member of the Iroquois and Press Clubs. 
He was well known as a horseman and frequently was seen driving a fine team 
upon the boulevards of the city. He loved travel and art and indulged his fond- 
ness for both, and neither was disassociated from his student proclivities. He was 
ever an interested and keen observer wherever he went, whether in the art galleries 
or the old world or in shaping the history of modern days in the life of his home 
city. Progress and patriotism might well be termed the key to his character and 
his life was an intellectual advancement that found expression in tangible and 
beneficial results. 



BARNEY GREIN. 



Barney Grein, a well known representative of the undertaking business in Chicago, 
is numbered among the native sons of Illinois, his birth having occurred in Men- 
dota on the 22d of December, 1859. He attended the parochial schools in the days 
of his boyhood and youth and afterward learned the cigar maker's trade. In 1877 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 47 

he made his initial step in connection with the undertaking business by entering the 
employ of Cornelius Birren, a well known undertaker of Chicago, and for a decade 
he remained in the service of others, but ambitious to engage in business on his own 
account, he utilized every opportunity that would bring to him capital sufficient to 
enable him to take the desired step. It was in 1887 that he began business for 
himself at 1727 Larrabee street. He prospered in his undertakings, securing a 
liberal patronage, and in 1902 he erected a building at No. 1723 Larrabee street, 
with twenty-five feet front and three stories in height. In it is a modern chapel 
capable of seating one hundred, and this was one of the first chapels in any under- 
taking establishment on the north side. After successfully conducting his business 
on Larrabee street for a number of years Mr. Greiji further extended his interests 
by the opening of another establishment at No. 2110 Irving Park boulevard in 1912. 
He there purchased a three-story building and has a chapel seating one hundred and 
fifty people. The business at that point is managed by his son Joseph, while 
Mr. Grein and his son Henry conduct the Larrabee street place. He is well known 
as a prominent and leading member of the Chicago Undertakers Association, of 
which he has served as the treasurer for many years. 

In 1883 Mr. Grein was united in marriage to Miss Barbara Bartzen, of She- 
boygan, Wisconsin, and to them have been born four children: Joseph, who is 
associated with his father in business, having charge of the Irving Park boulevard 
parlors ; Anna, who is the wife of .Peter Weber, of Chicago ; Alma, the wife of Paul 
Kohnen, also of Chicago ; and Henry, who is a partner of his father. 

The religious faith of the familj' is that of the Catholic church and Mr. Grein 
has membership in St. Michael's, in the work of which he takes an active and help- 
ful part. He belongs to the Independent Order of Foresters and to the Catholic 
Order of Foresters. In politics he is a democrat but has never been ambitious to 
hold office, preferring always to concentrate his efforts and attention upon his busi- 
ness interests, which have been wisely and carefully conducted, and by reason of his 
close application, his persistent purpose and his earnest desire to please his patrons 
he has built up a business of extensive and substantial proportions. 



WILLIAM ADOLPHUS PETERSON. 

Americans are often accused of a too forcible desire for the accumulation of 
money, thus losing sight of the main objects of life, which are service to otliers 
and the development of the highest powers of the individual. The charge, however, 
cannot truly be brought against many intelligent and public-spirited citizens of 
Chicago, among whom may be named William Adolphus Peterson, proprietor of 
the Peterson Nursery. He is the largest holder of land within the limits of Chi- 
cago and the head of one of the great business enterprises of the country, Mr. 
Peterson is also one of the leaders in religious, educational and philanthropic work 
and his efforts in those imjiortant lines, as in the field of business, have met with 
gratifying success. He was born in the old homestead at Lincoln and Peterson 
avenues, Chicago, April 29, 1867, the only child of Peter S. and Mary (Gage) 
Peterson, record of whom appears elsewhere in this work. 

Mr. Peterson of this review attended the public schools and later became a 



48 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

studtnt of the Evanston high school from which lie was graduated in 1885. Imme- 
diately after leaving high school he entered the nursery business of his father 
and upon the death of the latter succeeded him as sole proprietor of the Peterson 
Nursery. This nursery was established in 1856 and comprised four hundred and 
fifty acres, all of which are within the city limits. A short time ago, however, Mr. 
Peterson disposed of sixty acres for the location of a tuberculosis hospital, but he 
is still the largest holder of land in the city of Chicago. Under his management 
the business has continued to grow in volume and popularity and he is today at 
the head of the largest ornamental nursery in America. He has a practical knowl- 
edge of all the details of the business from the time of planting the seed until the 
delivery has been made to the customer. He is the originator of several new vari- 
eties of peonies and also of a beautiful new ash which is now universally known as 
the Peterson Bronze Ash. 

Mr. Peterson has found time aside from his regular business to assist materially 
in the promotion of a number of important enterprises. He is a member of the 
board of directors of the State Bank of Chicago; a trustee of the ]\IcCormick Theo- 
logical Seminary and the Moody Bible Institute ; treasurer and trustee of the 
Olivet Institute ; and a director of the School of Domestic Arts and Sciences. He 
has taken a great interest in civic affairs and is a member of the City Plans Com- 
mission of Chicago; of the Association of Commerce; and of the Civic Association 
of America, in the latter of which he was very active for a number of years. He 
is also a member of the Campus Commission of the Northwestern University and 
has shown his willingness at all times to assist in promoting the highest interests 
of his native city and its institutions. His principal activity, outside of business, 
has been along lines of church and Sunday school work. He is president of the 
board of trustees of the Bowmanvlle Congregational church and for thirteen years 
has been superintendent of its Sunday school, while he acted as deacon from 1892 
to 1904. He is now an elder in the Edgewater Presbyterian church, and for six 
and one-half vears has been leader of the Young: Men's Bible Class of that 
organization. His interest in Sunday school work dates from the time he was twelve 
years of age and has continued unabated. He is now filling the highest position 
in the gift of the Sunday schools of Cook county — that of president of the Cook 
County Sunday School Association and he is as well treasurer of the International 
Sunday School Association. He is treasurer of the Laymen's Evangelical Council 
and has been active in the promotion of the Presbyterian Brotherhood since 1904, 
serving as its president in 1907. He has spoken extensivelj' before civic and 
religious bodies and is the author of numerous tracts and Bible study talks. 

On the 2d of August, 1892, !Mr. Peterson was married to Miss Mary Hill, a 
daughter of Thomas Clarkson Hill, of Western Springs, Illinois, the father being 
a member of the Society of Friends and one of the founders of Western Springs. 
Mrs. Peterson is a lady of rare personal and intellectual powers and, like her 
husband, is very active in religious work. 

The family reside at the old homestead, at Lincoln and Peterson avenues, a 
beautiful country ])lace within the cit}'- limits. Here was formerh' the site of 
Indian villages from which Mr. Peterson has collected many relics. These relics 
with others he has gathered from all parts of the world, comprise a collection of 
ten thousand specimens, all of which are classified and arranged to show the sim- 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 49 

ilarity in advancement of primitive people of various parts of the globe at the 
same period. He is also a collector of old books and manuscripts and has over 
four thousand si^ecimens, some of which are probably the oldest in Chicago. He 
has traveled extensively and spent much time in Sweden, the birthplace of his 
father, in which country he has always taken a keen interest. He was three times 
presented to King Oscar and once to the present king, Gustavus V., who in 1909 
presented him with the insignia of Knight of the Order of Vasa, a distinction con- 
ferred upon civilians in recognition of their having achieved distinction in peaceful 
pursuits. Mr. Peterson is the fifth citizen of the United States to receive this 
decoration. 

Socially he and his wife are prominent in the city. He is a member of the 
Union League, City, and Glen View Country Clubs and can claim a host of friends 
in those organizations and also throughout the entire country. A wideawake and 
progressive man, he also possesses an abiding interest and enthusiasm in the pro- 
motion of the general good, and his greatest happiness is found in promoting the 
permanent welfare of his fellows. It is men of this class who encourage others 
to help themselves and who are acknowledged today as among the world's greatest 
benefactors. 



WILLIAM J. O'XEIL. 



William J. O'Neil, whose residence in Chicago dates from 1890, in which year 
he established an undertaking business on Grand avenue, was born in Ireland on 
the 10th of March, 1848, a son of Philip and Bridget O'Neil, who came to the 
United States in the '50s and settled in Troy, New York, where they spent their 
remaining days. 

It was in that city that William J. O'Neil was reared and in its public schools 
he acquired his education. After his textbooks were put aside he entered the 
grocery business, with which he was associated until 188 i, when he turned his 
attention to the undertaking business, which he followed in the east until 1890. It 
was on the 28th of October of that year that he arrived in Chicago and soon after- 
ward he opened an undertaking establishment at 428 West Grand avenue, which 
was the old number. In 1899 he erected a building at 1618 West Grand avenue 
with a frontage of seventy-five feet. A part of this he rents, his undertaking par- 
lors having a frontage of twenty-five feet. The building is two stories in height 
and the chapel lias a seating capacity of fifty. With the growth of his business 
he opened another establishment in May, 1910, at No. 5046 West Chicago avenue, 
in that section of the city known as Austin. He became one of the charter members 
of the Chicago Undertakers Association, with which he is identified. 

It would be incorrect to state that Mr. O'Neil has been identified with Chicago 
since 1890, for he first visited the city in April, 1865, and was employed in a brush 
factory, remaining at the time for fifteen months, after which he returned to Troy, 
New York. Later, in 1871, he came to Chicago, where he remained for three years 
in the sand business and assisted in the rebuilding of the city after the fire. 

In 1877 Mr. O'Neil was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Hannah, of Troy, 
New York, and to them have been born three children: James, who is in business 



50 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

with liis father ; Sarah ; and WilHam^ wlio is also in business with his father, having 
charge of the second establishment at No. 50i6 West Chicago Avenue. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Catholic church, they being com- 
municants of St. Columbkilles church. INIr. O'Neil is also identilied with the 
Catholic Order of Foresters, the Knights of Columbus, the Knights of The Mac- 
cabees, the Columbian Knights and in politics he is an independent democrat. 



LAMBERT TREE. 



The progress of today makes the history of tomorrow, and because of the im- 
portant and helpful part he took in shaping the events of vital importance to 
Chicago, Lambert Tree left an indelible impress upon the history of the city. Dis- 
tinguished as a lawyer and jurist, he was equallj^ widely known and honored by 
reason of the many progressive public movements which he instituted and aided 
and which constituted tangible evidence of his devotion to the citv's M^elfare. At 
the time of his death, which occurred October 9, 1910, the Record Herald said 
editorially: "Chicago has lost one of her ablest and best citizens. His active 
participation in public affairs came to an end years ago, but his interest in im- 
portant civic questions and movements continued undiminished up to the moment 
of his passing. Old friends and younger men have had the benefit of his advice, 
his ripe knowledge, his wide experience and his uncompromising loyalty to prin- 
ciple and conviction." 

Mr. Tree was a native of Washington, his birth having occurred in the capital 
city November 29, 1832. He belonged to a family founded in America in 1635, 
when representatives of the name settled in Maryland. His parents Avere Lambert 
and Laura M. (Burrows) Tree and in both lines he was descended from Revolu- 
tionary stock. His paternal grandfather was a captain of artillery in the Revo- 
lutionary war and was killed at the battle of Trenton. His maternal grandfather. 
General Burrows, served throughout the war for independence and was a functionary 
of the government when it removed from Philadelphia to Washington. His father 
was also at one time a soldier and for a considerable period was in the govern- 
ment employ at Washington, where the family enjoyed the entree of the best so- 
ciety of the capital, so that in his youth Lambert Tree met several presidents and 
many of the statesmen whose names have become an inseparable part of the coun- 
try's history. 

Lambert Tree acquired his early education under private tutors and in prepara- 
tion for the bar attended the University of Virginia, from which he was graduated 
with the Bachelor of Law degree in 1855. He then returned to Washington, where 
he entered the law office of James Mandeville Carlisle, then a celebrated lawi'cr. 
It was while in this office that Mr. Tree first met Rufus Choate, who spoke to Mr. 
Carlisle of his wish to secure some one who could take down in longhand (for 
there were no stenographers in those da^^s) an argument he M-as to deliver in the 
supreme court. Mr. Tree had had some practice in this work in taking down de- 
bates from the senate galleries and volunteered to aid Choate, who accepted the 
offer. On the 15th of October, 1855, Mr. Tree M^as admitted to the bar in Wash- 
ington. Immediately he gave up his position in Mr. Carlisle's office and at the 




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CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 53 

advice of Senator Stephen A. Douglas concerning a favorable location in the west, 
came to Chicago and entered at once upon the active work of a profession in which 
advancement must depend upon individual merit, fortunate environment or family 
connection contributing little to success at the bar. However, no dreary novitiate 
awaited him. He soon proved his ability and came to be recognized as one of the 
foremost representatives of the legal profession in the middle of the nineteenth 
century — a position which the consensus of opinion accorded him throughout the 
remainder of his life. Mr. Tree brought with him to Chicago a letter of introduc- 
tion to John M. Douglas, who had just been appointed attorney for the Illinois 
Central Railroad and who offered Mr. Tree a position in his office at a salary 
of twelve hundred dollars a year. This was considered a large salary for that 
day but he declined the offer, wishing to engage in general practice. During the 
first ■week of his residence in Chicago he won his first case as defending counsel 
for the Illinois Central Railroad against Murray F. Tuley. His fee was ten dol- 
lars. Not long afterward he became a partner in the firm of Clarkson & Tree, with 
offices at the southeast corner of Clark and Lake streets. It was there that he first 
met Abraham Lincoln, who had come from Springfield to Chicago on a matter of 
business and desired to consult a law book, for which purpose he visited the office 
of Clarkson & Tree, who possessed one of the best law libraries of the city. Then 
began a friendship between the two men that was terminated only in the death 
of the martyred president. 

In ] 864 i\Ir. Tree was called to his first office, being made president of the 
Law Institute and from 1870 until 1875 sat upon the circuit bench. His legal 
and judicial history are indeed a credit to a bar which has numbered some of the 
most distinguished men of the nation. One of his first official acts was to deliver 
a vigorous charge to the grand jury to investigate rumors of corruption and bribery 
in the city council. The result was numerous indictments and the conviction and 
punishment of a score or more of aldermen for accepting bribes. The trial at- 
tracted widespread attention at the time and was the first conviction for the offense 
in Illinois. Judge Tree conducted himself with such signal dignity, honor and 
justice through this delicate situation that in 1873 he was made the candidate of 
his party for the full term and was elected without opposition. The strenuous 
duties of the office, however, impaired his health and at the close of his term he 
went abroad, where he took up the study of French, Italian, German and Spanish 
and upon his return to his native land could fluently speak all those tongues. 

Too catholic in his interests to limit his efforts to a single line, Mr. Tree be- 
came recognized as a leader in public thought and opinion and his activities were 
resultant factors in the attainment of ends which have constituted a chief source 
of Chicago's greatness and power. He was three times a candidate for congress, 
although he knew that there was no hope of election. Each time, however, the 
majorities against him were smaller, indicating his growing popularity and the 
confidence reposed in him by his fellow townsmen. In 1885 he was the demo- 
cratic candidate for United States senator and his personal popularity and the 
recognition of his ability carried him within one vote of election, John A. Logan 
being the successful candidate. During the previous year he had been delegate 
at large from Illinois to the democratic national convention. He received appoint- 
ment from President Cleveland to the position of United States minister to Bel- 
gium. He remained abroad for three years and during his residence in Brussels 



54 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

represented tlie United States government in the international congress for the 
reform of commercial and maritime law, an assemblage of representatives of all 
civilized nations of the world. In September, 1885, he was appointed the United 
States minister to Russia and continued there through the remainder of Presi- 
dent Cleveland's administration. He was appointed by President Harrison the 
democratic member of the monetary commission M-hich convened in Washington 
in January, 1891, and settled monetary questions between all South American re- 
publics, Mexico and the United States. His keen insight into the vital questions 
there discussed constituted an element in the important work that was done. 

Mr. Tree became one of the incorporators of the American Red Cross. He 
took a warm interest in the work of the international conference held at Brussels 
in 1889 for the purpose of framing a treaty for the suppression of the African 
slave trade, and he had much influence in rescuing from defeat a treaty which 
the conference framed. Numerous contributions from his pen explained the pro- 
visions of the treaty and it was ratified finally by the United States senate. In 
Chicago the labors of Mr. Tree were equally varied and efficacious. He was from 
189S until 1897 president of the Illinois State Historical Library and was at one 
time vice president of the Chicago Historical Society, being keenly interested in 
perpetuating in enduring form the record of those events which have shaped the 
city's history. He was also a life trustee of the Newberry Library. In more mate- 
rial lines he was a director of the ^Merchants Loan & Trust Company, of the Chi- 
cago Safe Deposit Company and the Chicago Edison Company In 1889 he 
presented to the city a beautiful bronze statue of La Salle and in 189J^ a bronze 
statue of a Sioux warrior, entitled "A Signal of Peace." Both of these adorn 
Lincoln Park. Just prior to the World's Columbian Exposition his democratic 
friends urged him to become a candidate for the mayoralty but this he declined 
to do. "Lambert Tree was a democrat of the old school," said Roger C. Sullivan 
at the time of his death, "and one of the finest gentlemen of his time. Chicago 
loses one of its greatest citizens and the whole democratic party and the entire 
nation loses one whose services for good cannot be overestimated." After his re- 
tirement from diplomatic service he gave his attention to the supervision of his 
personal and invested interests. He had in the early years of his residence in 
Chicago become largely interested in real estate and he left a valuable fortune, 
much of which was in property. 

Mr. Tree was married in 1859 to ]\Iiss Anna J. ]Magie, a daughter of H. H. 
Magie, a Chicago pioneer, and to them was born a son, Arthur Magie Tree, who 
married Ethel, a daughter of Marshall Field, by whom he had three children, of 
whom but one, Ronald Lambert Tree, born September 26, 1897, is now living. 

Mr. Tree was a member of the Chicago and Iroquois Clubs of this city, of 
the Union Club of New York and the Metropolitan Club of Washington. Almost 
seven years to the day before his demise, I\Ir. Tree lost his wife, who died sud- 
denly on shipboard while returning from Europe. His own death occurred in 
New York following his return from abroad after making his one hundred and 
twenty-second voyage across tlie Atlantic. He was unpretentious in manner but 
the work that he accomplished nevertheless entitled him to praise and regard. 
Successful accomplishment ever crowned his efforts, whether in the field of law, 
wherein his ability was attested by the extent and importance of his clienbige; in 
statesmanship, where in ministerial appointments he proved an able representative 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 55 

of the government ; or in municipal affairs, where he looked toward the upbuilding 
of a greater city. 

Tlie Chicago Tribune said editorially: "Lambert Tree had been prominently 
identified with the material and social life of Cliicago for more than half a cen- 
tury. His death seems like the destruction of a landmark, like the cutting of a 
link which united the Chicago of the days before the war and the great fire with 
the Chicago of today. He had attained enviable prominence at the bar, on the 
bench and in the political arena. It was with regret that the community saw 
him leave the courts. He had the legal knowledge and the sober, dispassionate 
judgment which go to the making of a good judge. He was one of the wise and 
trusted counselors of his party in this state as long as it held to its old faiths. When 
it abandoned them in 1896 it lost him. When loyalty to the party organization 
meant disloyalty to the interests of the country there was but one course open to 
him. He did all he could, and it was much, for the cause of sound money. Mr. 
Tree was proud of Chicago. He played well his part in promoting its material 
and artistic development. As in public life he had the respect of all, so in private 
life he won the warm regard of all who came in contact with him. He made no 
enemies, but he left a host of friends to deplore their personal loss and that civic 
loss involved in the death of a good citizen." 



CARL JOHN STEIN. 



Carl John Stein is the president of the C. J. Stein Company, conducting an 
extensive and important plumbing contracting business. Thoroughly qualified in 
this particular, he has developed a trade of extensive proportions that has secured 
for him the plumbing contracts in many of the largest and finest buildings of this 
section. Mr. Stein is a native if New Orleans, Louisiana. He was born on the 
24th of June, 1873, a son of Charles A. Stein, who was a native of Berlin, Ger- 
many, and came to America in the early '60s. He served with Custer's Cavalry in 
the west but escaped massacre when so many of Custer's forces lost their lives on 
the western frontier. After leaving New Orleans he removed to St. Paul, Minne- 
sota, subsequent to the war and afterward filled various public offices there, con- 
tinuing his residence in that city until his death, which occurred in 1892, when he 
was fifty-two years of age. His wife bore the maiden name of Annie de Silver and 
was a native of Liverpool, England. Her death occurred about thirty years ago 
when she was forty-three years of age. In the family were eight children, of 
whom Carl J. and his sister, Mrs. O. A. Rohn, are now residents of Chicago. 

Carl J. Stein pursued his education in the public schools of St. Paul and in 
Curtis Business College. When fourteen years of age he entered upon an appren- 
ticeship to Dwyer Brothers, plumbers of St. Paul, and for several years he was 
employed as a journeyman in various sections of the country. In 1893 he came 
to Chicago, and established business at his present location. He has conducted 
business at the jjoint that he now occupies for the past twenty-five years and is 
regarded as one of the leading plumbing contractors of the cit3^ He was awarded 
the contract for the plumbing work in the Sherman Hotel, in the Lytton building, 
in Reid, Murdoch & Company's wholesale house, the plants of the W^estern Electric 



56 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

Company and Sears^ Roebuck & Company ;, also the plumbing of the Illinois Athletic 
Club, and he did all of the work on the tuberculosis sanitarium at Bryn Mawr and 
Fortieth streets and in several hospitals at Oak Forest. He has recently installed 
the plumbing in the Beatrice Creamery building at No. 1526 South State street, 
a two million dollar structure, and in the Detroit (Mich.) cold storage plant, a 
half-million dollar building, and he also has a quarter of a million dollar contract 
at Dawson Springs, Kentucky. In addition to his extensive and important interests 
along this line he is connected with the Midland Terracotta Companj^ 

Mr. Stein resides at No. 59'i<8 South Park avenue. His rehgious faith is that 
of the Episcopal church and his political belief that of the republican party. He 
prefers to concentrate his efforts and attention, however, upon his business interests 
rather than upon outside activities. For two years he was president of the Chicago 
Master Plumbers' Association and has been vice president of the Building Con- 
struction Employers Association. He sat on the board of directors of the National 
Association of Master Plumbers and he has been called upon for official service in 
other connections, being for four years a member of the board of governors of the 
Illinois Athletic Club. He holds a life membership in that club and he is also well 
known as a member of the Masonic fraternity and the Mystic Shrine and a member 
of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Knights of Pythias. He is 
forceful and resourceful and his qualities well fit him for leadership in any par- 
ticular. Whatever he undertakes he carries forward to successful completion and 
his determination and energy have enabled him to overcome all difficulties and 
obstacles in his way. His standards of life are high, his purjaoses manly and 
sincere, and laudable ambition and indefatigable energy have carried him forward 
into important relations. 



JOHN K. PLATNER. 



John K. Platner is known as one of those men who stand at the head of the under- 
taking profession of .the country. He has been honored with the presidency of the 
Illinois Undertakers Association and has been called to various other important 
official positions. A native of New York, he was born in Westford, Otsego county, 
on the 12th of January. 1869, a son of William H. and Amanda (Tyler) Platner. 
The father was also engaged in the undertaking business, which he conducted at 
Westford, New York, starting in that line about 1845 and so continuing until his 
death, which occurred in 1892. 

In the acquirement of his education John K. Platner attended the jmblic schools 
and in 1888 went to Utica, New York, where for one year he was employed by the 
firm of D. C. Whitton & Companj^, under whose direction he learned the art of em,- 
balming and directing funerals according to the best city ideas and customs. In 
1889 he embarked in business on his own account by becoming one of the partners 
in the firm of Farnsworth & Platner at Lockport, New York. After a year's con- 
nection with the business there he sold his interest to his partner and accepted a 
position with the Central Manufacturing Company of Buffalo, New York, which he 
represented upon the road as a traveling salesman, his territory covering Ohio, 
Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin and Minnesota. He was afterward sent to 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 57 

New York city as city salesman and embalmer to the trade and worked directly 
under Professor Sullivan, one of the originators of the arterial method of embalm- 
ing. He remained as embalmer to the trade for the Central Manufacturing Com- 
pany in its New York office for some time, taking the position vacated by his former 
instructor, Professor Sullivan. His travels in the west, however, had awakened in 
him a desire to become a resident of this section of the country and in 1892 he came 
to Chicago, where he became associated with a firm of undertakers. He has since 
been identified with the business in this city and has occupied a prominent position 
as a representative of the profession. 

Mr. Platner has been a most active factor in association work and in 1904 was 
elected president of the Chicago Undertakers Association. Two years later 
President Christian of the National Funeral Directors Association appointed Mr. 
Platner chairman of the executive committee and he thus assisted in making the 
arrangements for the national convention which was held in Chicago in 1907. It was 
in the same year that he was elected to the presidency of the Illinois Undertakers' 
Association and in 1909 he served as a member of the transportation committee of 
the National Association and assisted in perfecting the arrangements for the special 
train which carried the members and their families to the convention at Portland, 
Oregon. It was during his incumbency in the office of president of the Illinois State 
Association that Mr. Platner was appointed by the Illinois state board of health as 
a member of the embalmers examining board and throughout all the intervening 
period lie has served in that capacity. 

On the 20th of October, 1892, Mr. Platner was united in marriage to Miss Cassie 
M. Sheldon, of Chicago. Fraternally he is prominently known as a Mason, having 
taken the degrees of both the York and Scottish rites. He has membership in Kil- 
winning Lodge, No. 311, A. F. & A. M.; Corinthian Chapter, No. 69, R. A. M.; 
Chicago Council, No. 4, R. & S. M. ; St. Bernard Commandery, No. 35, K. T. ; Oriental 
Consistory, S. P. R. S., of the Valley of Chicago ; and Medinah Temple, A. A. O. N. M. 
S. He is also identified with the Standard Club and the Illinois Club. Mr. Platner 
is a man of attractive personality, of marked force of character and of ability. Those 
who know him, and he has a very wide acquaintance, esteem him highly and he has 
a circle of friends almost coextensive with the circle of his acquaintance. 



HENRY HARRISON WALKER. 

Among the men who in the last forty years have utilized the opportunities offered 
in Chicago for business progress and attained thereby notable success is Henry 
Harrison Walker, the founder and head of the well known firm of Henry LI. Walker 
& Company, dealers in real estate, mortgages, loans and investments, as well as in 
the general management of property, with offices in the Tacoma building. He is 
today one of the best known and most successful real-estate men in the city and his 
activity has contributed to the general progress and improvement as well as to 
individual prosperity. During his identification with this business he has handled 
millions of dollars worth of property, either as an individual or for others. 

The name of Walker has for more than half a century been prominently identified 
with Chicago's growth and development, for it was in 1853 that the older brother, 



58 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

Samuel J. Walker, first became interested in Cliicago real estate. He later became 
one of the most prominent real-estate men in the city and at one time was the 
largest individual landowner within the corporation limits of the city. In refer- 
ence to his business ability he was far ahead of his time, and during his residence 
here planned and executed some of the most important real-estate projects that 
had been launched in Chicago up to that time. His largest holdings were in dock 
property and included all of Canalport, or the first, second and third dock addi- 
tions. His development of this property resulted in location thereon of the great 
McCormick plant, as well as other large industrial interests, and causing the west 
fork to become a most important part of the Chicago harbor. It was he who trans- 
formed what was then Reuben street into Ashland avenue, by widening it and mak- 
ing the lots from one hundred and fifty to two hundred feet deep and establishing 
a building line. He also lined it with large shade trees along the wide walks. 

Henry Harrison Walker was born in Campbell county, Kentucky, and on the 
paternal side is of German extraction, while his mother was a representative of the 
old Cooper family of Virginia. His earh' education was secured in the schools of 
his native county and he later attended high school at Newport, Kentucky, and a 
commercial college at Cincinnati, Ohio, Mr. Walker became interested in the dry- 
goods trade in Covington, Kentucky, in connection with his brother, J. W. Walker, 
and later disposing of his interests there joined his brother, Samuel J. Walker, in 
Chicago. This was in 1 869, since which time he has been intimately identified with 
the real-estate interests in this city. In connection with his real-estate business 
he has laid out a number of subdivisions to the city and has handled a large amount 
of dock property, particularly suitable for manufacturing sites. 

Mr. Walker has traveled extensively and has visited Europe many times during 
the past twenty years. The experience thus gained in the study of public utilities, 
together with a wide observation and extended converse with intelligent men, has 
broadened his mind into a comprehensive knowledge of the needs of an up-to-date 
city. He has been particularly zealous in his support of the Chicago river, bclievirtg 
that its best interests would be conserved in the preservation and improvement of 
that waterway in its natural relation to the city. Mr. Walker has devoted years of 
study to harbor and drainage facilities and their influence upon the commercial de- 
velopment and prosperity of a great city. Mr. Walker's long and successful career 
as a real-estate man has given him a prominent place among the shrewd judges of 
such values in Chicago, his holdings including large and valuable factory property 
bioth in his own fee and in trust for others. He has always taken a deep interest 
in the city's welfare, never hesitating to advocate or oppose any measure or jiroject 
which in his judgment merited indorsement or opposition. He represents a high 
type of citizenship and is regarded as one of the leading business men of Chicago, 
occupying a high position in commercial and social circles. He is a member of the 
Chicago Club, the Chicago Historical Society and is also connected with the 
Onwentsia Club, the Wheaton Golf Club and the Saddle and Cycle Club. 

Politically Mr. Walker is non-partisan, particularly in municij^al and state mat- 
ters, supporting issues or candidates with regard to their merit and virtue rather 
than party affiliation. In national affairs he is usually in sympathy with the 
democracy, yet that does not serve to enlist his support regardless of party attitude. 

Mr. Walker married Miss Jessie Spalding, a daughter of Jesse Spalding, one of 
the lumber kings of his time and a prominent citizen of Chicago. Their citv resi- 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 59 

dence is at No. 1721 Prairie avenue. Having attained the age when many business 
men have retired or are preparing to do so. it is doubtful if such a thought has ever 
entered his head, his being a sturdj^, persistent and conscientious nature that has 
supreme faith in the continuity as well as the dignity of labor. He has a pleasing 
presence, is polished in conversation, refined in manner and genial and courteous at 
all times. His is a splendid type of an alert, enterprising business man and his 
record is an indication that success is ambition's answer. 



FRANK CUNEO. 



To set the standard in any field of activity by establishing a business that be- 
comes the foremost in its line, exciting the admiration and stimulating the efforts 
of others, is to give proof of the possession of superior business qualifications. This 
Frank Cuneo has done, being today a partner in the largest importing and whole- 
sale business in fruit and nuts in America. The secret of his success is not far 
to seek for close application, indefatigable energy and progressive methods have 
constituted the foundation of the enterprise which he has built up. He is num- 
bered among Chicago's native sons, his birth having occurred January (J, 18G2. 
The surname indicates his Italian ancestry, his parents being John B. and Kath- 
erine (Lagomarcino) Cuneo. Leaving Genoa, Italy, in the early '50s, the father 
became one of the first representatives of his country in Chicago, where he es- 
tablished and conducted a wholesale grocery business. His keen business sagacity 
also prompted his investment in real estate and for many years his ownership of 
down-town property was extensive. He also became an active factor in the public 
life of the city and, in close sympathy with the republican form of government and 
imbued at all times with the spirit of progress, he was influential in promoting 
the work of general improvement and upbuilding. He died in 1901, having for 
about four years survived his wife. 

In the public schools of Chicago Frank Cuneo pursued his education and in 
1881, when nineteen years of age, became one of the partners in the firm of Gari- 
ba.ldfi & Cuneo, of which he has been the active head for the past quarter of a 
century. The business has been steadily developed along substantial lines until 
the firm is today the largest importers and wholesale dealers in fruits and nuts 
in the United States. They make a specialty of bananas and tropical and Cali- 
fornia fruits and their trade extends over a wide territory and includes many of 
the leading houses of Chicago. Into other fields Mr. Cuneo has extended his efi'orts 
with equal success. He now owns considerable stock in the Merchants Fruit Ex- 
change, which controls all California deciduous fruits coming east, and of this 
company he is one of the officers. He was likewise one of the organizers of the 
Lion Fig & Date Company of which he is president and is an officer of the Texas 
Nut Company. He is likewise known in financial circles as one of the directors 
of the Hamilton National Bank and his ownershiij of real estate in the business 
icentcr of the city has made him well known to those who are interested in the 
purchase and sale of down-town property. His labors liave not only been an element 
in promoting his own success but have also constituted a potent factor in develop- 
ing its trade interests. He was largely instrumental in securing the establishment 



60 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

of the Illinois Central freight house at the foot of South Water street and was the 
prime mover in the organization of the Italian Chamber of Commerce, of which 
he has been the president from the beginning, in 1908. His labors in this con- 
nection won the recognition of the Italian government, which knighted him with 
the cross of Savoy. 

In February, 1885, Mr. Cuneo was married in Chicago to Miss Amelia Gandolfo, 
of this city, who died in 1891, leaving four sons: John F., who is engaged in the 
book-binding business; Lawrence F., an importer of olive oil; Columbus F., sales 
manager for the Lion Fig & Date Company; and America F., who is attending 
school. The family reside at No. 4849 Sheridan Road. Mr. Cuneo manifests his 
jaolitical allegiance to the republican party but takes no active part in politics aside 
from casting the weight of his influence in support of men and measures working for 
the public good. In business life he has always followed constructive measures. To 
build up rather than to destroy is his broad jjolicy and he attacks everything with 
contagious enthusiasm. The simple weight of his character and ability has carried 
him into important relations and he has long been recognized as a foremost mer- 
chant of his native city. 



H. DURWARD LUDLOW. 

An outstanding figure in undertaking circles in Chicago is H. Durward Ludlow, 
whose establishment is the last word in connection with undertaking service. He 
was born in Thaw\'ille, Illinois, Ajoril 9, 1873, and is a son of Henry M. and Martha 
Etta (Wyman) Ludlow, both of whom were natives of Boston. The father was a 
farmer by occupation and in young manhood removed westward to Illinois, where his 
remaining days were jsassed. The mother still survives and is now living in Sioux 
Falls, South Dakota. In 1881, the family removed to Jefferson, Iowa, and there H. 
Durward Ludlow, who was a lad of 8 years at the time of the removal, acquired 
a public school education, passing through consecutive grades to the high school. He 
afterward attended the Bennett Medical College of Chicago, with the idea of enter- 
ing the medical profession, but his attention was diverted to other fields and he 
became connected with the undertaking jjrofession in 1895. He was in the employ 
of others until 1904, when he opened an establishment on his own account at Forty- 
seventh .street and Grand boulevard. In April. 1916, he occupied a building of his 
own at No. 558 East Forty-seventh street. He has the largest and most modern 
undertaking establishment in the middle west. His building is thirty by one hundred 
and twenty-five feet and of this she uses the first story and basement. The building 
is a two-story structure, with an eight-foot basement. There is a large reception 
room, upon entering, with mosaic floor, and its furnishings are like those of a modern 
home. Adjoining is a large office in which business may be privately transacted. 
There is also a retiring parlor in which the minister may meet and interview the 
family and the extensive chapel has given rise to the name by which the establish- 
ment is known — the Daylight Church. It is splendidly lighted all around, is equipped 
Avith a pipe organ and comfortable pews and the seating capacity is three hundred. 
The display room is of the most modern character, containing thirty-six caskets in 
dust-proof cabinets upon revolving stands, giving a clear view of every casket. 



THE NEW YORK 
"' MC LIBRARY 



ASTOR. IKSOX AND 
TILDEX KOL'NDATIOXS 
B L 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 63 

It also contains wardrobe cabinets. In addition the Ludlow establishment contains 
a large operating room, completely equipped with the latest ajipliances. Mr. Ludlow 
owns a hearse and motor car equipment and there is an enclosed rear entrance for 
receiving and discharging everything under cover and from public view. It was Mr. 
Ludlow who conducted the first automobile funeral in America or elsewhere. He 
has been a member of the Chicago Undertakers Association since he has been in the 
business and has been connected with the State Association for many years. 

In April, 1903, Mr. Ludlow was united in marriage to Miss Grace Anna Duell, 
of Clinton, Iowa. Fraternally he is connected with Composite Lodge, No. 879, A. F. 
& A. M., of which he is a charter member; Milton Chapter, No. 647, R. A. M.; and 
Aryan Grotto, No. 18. He also belongs to Lakeside Lodge, No. 450, I. O. O. F.; 
Carnation Lodge, No. 354, Knights of Pythias; the South Side Lodge of Moose, in 
which he has filled all of the chairs; and Chicago Lodge No. 4, B. P. O. E. He is 
likewise a member of the Chicago Motor Club and of Meonoken Tribe, No. 453, 
I. O. R. M. He has membership in the Memorial Church of Christ, in the work of 
which he takes a most active and helpful part. In politics he maintains an independ- 
ent course, voting according to the dictates of his judgment. He finds interest and 
recreation in music and is particularly fond of orchestra and band music. His 
friends find him a most likable man and their number is constantly increasing. 



ROBERT M. SWEITZER. 

In a great metropolitan center like Chicago there are acrimony, petty conten- 
tion and backbiting as factors in politics and a continuous struggle on the part 
of some to get ahead and win from those whom they regard not merely as oppo- 
nents, but as foes in their office hunting. In none of these things has Robert M. 
Sweitzer ever indulged and his policy of good cheer and good-fellowship, as well 
as his natural ability, have gained for him the success which has come to him in 
politics. Of the men who are to be found in the offices of the county building 
perhaps none is more popular than Robert M. Sweitzer, who in November, 1910, 
was elected to the office of county clerk. Throughout his life he has followed the 
pathway of cheer, with results that would seem to commend it to others. 

His birth occurred in Chicago, May 10, 1868, his parents being Martin and 
Sarah (Lamping) Sweitzer, the former a native of Strassburg, Germany, and the 
latter of Joliet, Illinois. In 1849, or when only three years of age, the father 
was brought to Chicago by his parents. Here he was reared to manhood and 
throughout the intervening period of sixty-two years has witnessed the greater part 
of the growth and development of the city. He is a self-made man in every sense 
of the term, for in early youth, of necessity, he made his start in the business 
world and from that time has been dependent entirely upon his own resources. 
He was connected with the theatrical business for a number of years, becoming 
stage manager for the old McVicker and other early theaters of the city. He was 
also a member of the first minstrel company that toured the country, known as 
the Arlington, Kemble and Cotton minstrels. His stage name was John Sweitzer 
Roach and he is still known by many old-timers as Johnny Roach. He is a great 
friend of all the old-time actors of today and usually makes it a point to visit or 

Vol. IV— 4 



64 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

meet them when they come to Chicago. For a number of years he has been inter- 
ested in the firm of Chapin & Gore and^ although now well advanced in years, he 
is still hale and hearty, being wonderfully well preserved and looking much younger 
than he is. 

His son Robert M. Sweitzer was educated in the public schools of Chicago, 
supplemented by business and commercial training in St. Patrick's Academy, from 
which he was graduated in 1884. He then engaged with the James H. Walker 
Company, wholesale dry-goods merchants, with whom he continued until the liquida- 
tion of the business in 1893. At that time he became connected with the John 
V. Farwell Company as territory manager, and remained with that house until his 
name was brought before the democratic nominating convention in July, 1910, 
during his absence on a business trip in the east. He was selected without solici- 
tation or any knowledge on his own part and after his name was placed on the 
ticket for county clerk his friends and the party rallied to his support and he was 
elected by a plurality of twenty thousand, becoming the second democrat to occupy 
this office. It was because of his business ability and popularity that lie was selected 
for the position, for aside from his connection with the house of John V. Farwell 
Company, he is a director of the Illinois Commercial Men's Association, an organiza- 
tion numbering ninety-two thousand commercial travelers as its members. 

The county clerk's office is now the most important office of Cook county. It 
carries with it the office of comptroller of Cook county, clerk of the county court, 
clerk of the commissioners, and there are altogether about three hundred employes. 
Mr. Sweitzer has the full confidence of the voters of the county and his official 
career is demonstrating the soundness of their judgment in calling him to the posi- 
tion. He is preeminently a business man and not a politician, and he is bringing 
to his work the same sterling, sturdy, stalwart business principles which have 
characterized him in the conduct of the important interests entrusted to his care 
by the John V. Farwell Company. 

On the 3d of August, 1904, Mr. Sweitzer was married to Miss Alice Kevil, of 
Chicago, a daughter of Patrick and Mary Kevil, and they have two children, Rob- 
ert M. and Alice Genevieve. Mr. Sweitzer belongs to Chicago Lodge. B. P. O. E., 
Garfield Park Lodge, L. O. O. M., the Royal League, of which he was formerly a 
member of the supreme council, and the Knights of Columbus, of which he is a 
district deputy. He is also a member of the Iroquois Club. He is always genial 
and courteous, is never too busy to be cordial, nor too cordial to be busy. He has 
delivered public addresses on the joy of living and is himself a sjjlendid exponent 
of that subject. 



FRANK G. RAINEY. 



Frank G. Rainev is well known in connection with the undertaking business in 
Chicago as manager of the interests now conducted under the name of Rainey 
Brothers. The firm was organized in 1900 with James M., Edward J., Henry P., 
John W. and Frank G. Rainey as partners. The brothers were sons of John J. 
and Catherine (Burke) Rainey, the former a native of Ireland, while the latter was 
born in Madison, Indiana. They removed to Chicago in the latter jaart of the '60s 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 65 

and the father was engaged in business as a stationary engineer. He passed away 
in 1899 and is still survived by his widow. Their family numbered five sons and 
a daughter, the latter being Mary, now the wife of Dr. J. D. Cain, of Chicago. 

Since the establishment of the business several of the brothers have passed 
away. James M. Rainey was a graduate of St. Ignatius College and became 
government inspector at the stock yards. He afterward entered the undertaking 
business, becoming a member of the firm of Rainey Brothers, and on the 18th of 
April, 1912, he passed away, leaving a wife and one son. 

Henrj^ P. Rainey, who also became a member of the firm, was a graduate of St. 
Ignatius College and of St. Viator's College. He joined his brothers in the organ- 
ization of the firm of Rainey Brothers, undertakers, but afterward decided to study 
for the priesthood and died while a student in the Catholic University at Washing- 
ton when within three months of his ordination. His demise occurred on the 27th 
of September, 1900. 

Edward J. Rainey became well known in political circles. After graduating 
from the parochial school in which he began his education he studied in St. Patrick's 
Commercial Academy and later became associated with Daniel Corkercy as general 
manager of the Chicago & Indiana Coal Company. After being identified with that 
business for some time he turned his attention to the undertaking business and joined 
his brothers in organizing the firm of Rainey Brothers. Later he became deeply and 
actively interested in politics and was called to prominent political positions, serv- 
ing for six terms as state senator from the ninth senatorial district. He studied law 
at Kent College and was admitted to the bar in 1901. He was a man of marked 
ability along various lines and his death, which occurred on Christmas day of 1911, 
was the occasion of deep and widespread regret not only to his immediate family 
but also to many friends. Thus three of the brothers who were in the original 
partnership have passed away, leaving John W. and Frank G. Rainey as owners 
of the business. The latter, however, is the active manager. 

John W. Rainey has married Ethel McMann, of Chicago, and they have two 
daughters. He was graduated from the De La Salle parochial school and from the 
De La Salle Institute. He then took up the study of law and was graduated from 
the Kent College of Law with the class of 1908. Previous to this time he had been 
engaged in the undertaking business. He filled the office of probate judge for 
three years and was elected circuit court clerk, which position he acceptably filled 
for four years. He is now practicing law as a member of the firm of Pollack, 
Rainey & Livingston but still retains his financial interest in the firm of Rainey 
Brothers. 

Frank G. Rainey, whose name introduces this review, pursued his education in 
the Nativity parochial school and was graduated from St. Viator's College on com- 
pleting a classical course. He, too, took up the study of law and was graduated 
from the Loyola Law School with the class of 1912. He is also a graduate of the 
De La Salle Institute. Upon the death of his brothers he took over the manage- 
ment of the undertaking business, in which he has since been engaged. Upon the 
organizatioii of the firm of Rainey Brothers a location was secured at 724 West 
Thirty-fifth street and in 1912 a removal was made to 1013 East Forty-seventh 
street. At one time they had two other places of business but closed these out. At 
his present location Mr. Rainey occupies a building with a twenty-foot frontage and 
he has a chapel seating two hundred people. He uses fine automobile service and 



66 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AXD ITS BUILDERS 

is prepared to take care of funerals in the most satisfactory way. He is a broad- 
minded, well informed business man of wide general information and the develop- 
ment of his powers further qualifies him for the capable conduct of the business in 
which he is now engaged. 

Mr. Rainey is well known in various fraternal orders. He has membership 
with the Knights of Columbus, the Modern Woodmen of America, the Mystic 
Workers of the World and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. His religious 
faith is indicated by his membership in St. Ambrose Catholic church. His political 
allegiance is given to the democratic party, which he has supported since age con- 
ferred upon him the right of franchise, and at all times he has kept well informed 
on the questions and issues of the day. He is now concentrating his efforts and 
attention largely upon the growing business which he is controlling as manager 
and from the organization of the firm the Rainey Brothers have been identified 
with the Undertakers Association. 



CHARLES DICKIXSOX, 



Charles Dickinson is ^Dreeminently a business man and is also numbered among 
those whose success has given them opportunity for participation in the activities, 
not strictly commercial, which mark the trend of the times and indicate the progress 
which is being made through initiative movements. His interests are, therefore, 
constantly broadening and thus through his varied relations he has become well 
known in some of the leading cities of the east and middle west, as well as in the 
foreign lands to which he has traveled for health and commercial purposes. His 
forty years' connection in trade circles has been chiefly with The Albert Dickinson 
Company and the Chicago Dock Company, and he is vice president of both. 

Chicago has always been the place of his residence. He was born on the 28th 
of May, 1858, on Wabash avenue, next to the south corner of Madison street, three 
years after his parents, Albert F. and Ann Elizabeth (Anthony) Dickinson, came to 
this city from Massachusetts, which state had been the ancestral home of both sides 
of the family through several generations. Both the father and mother were natives 
of western Massachusetts, where they resided until the father, convinced that the 
growing western city offered better business opportunities than he could secure in 
the east, moved first to Albany and then to Buffalo, New York, and in 1854 brought 
his family to Chicago. Their sons, Albert, Xathan and Charles, were sent to the 
public schools and Charles Dickinson, the youngest of the trio, therein pursued his 
education to the age of about fourteen years, when, after the fire of 1871, he was com- 
pelled to divide his time attending high school in the morning, while in the afternoon 
he worked for Charles Gossage & Company, early dry-goods merchants of the city, 
receiving a dollar and a half per week to start ^vit]l. In 1871 disaster came to the 
general grain produce and seed business, which had been established by his father 
on arriving in Chicago. The great fire of October had completely wiped out the 
warehouse and business except the books Avhich were saved. The father's health 
failing, his sons took up the business, Charles Dickinson, then about fifteen years of 
age, joining his brothers, Albert and Xathan, and his sister, Melissa, who had prev- 
iously been associated with their father, and the business was conducted under the 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 67 

name of Albert Dickinson through the succeeding sixteen years. Tlie three brothers 
and sister bent every energy not only to the upbuilding of the trade but paid off 
the debts of their father, also performing every service in connection with the busi- 
ness, their sister, Melissa, haying charge of the books. She died November 11, 
1910, at the age of seventy-one years. They were located originally before the fire 
of 1871 on Kinzie street, between State street and Dearborn avenue. The well 
devised and carefully executed plans of the brothers constituted the basis of con- 
tinued growth in the business. They gradually discontinued the general commis- 
sion business after they took charge in 1872, centering their efforts entirely upon 
grass and field seeds, and in 1888 the business was incorporated under the style of 
The Albert Dickinson Company, at which time Charles Dickinson was elected vice 
jDresident and has since remained as the second executive officer ; the harmonious 
cooperation of the brothers, their thorough understanding of the business, their 
study of trade conditions and their ability to so coordinate forces as to produce a 
unified whole, have been salient features in a success which has developed the enter- 
prise from a small undertaking to one of the most extensive of the kind in the world. 
After using the property of the Chicago Dock Company for storage purposes 
for some j^ears, in 1889 they obtained control of the company mentioned and in 
1896 removed their offices to their present location. Today the property utilized 
for the conduct of the business covers six hundred and ninety feet on Taylor street, 
four hundred feet on the river and Sixteenth and Clark streets, with frontage of 
two hundred and sixty-six feet on Clark street. Every facility has been secured 
to promote the trade and handle the product, including storage and wharfage accom- 
modations, and the most modern machinery for handling the goods. To save time 
and transportation branch houses have been established in Minneapolis, Min- 
nesota, and Lansing, Michigan. The company is now capitalized for two hundred 
and fifty thousand dollars, with Albert Dickinson as president; Charles Dickinson, 
vice president; Nathan Dickinson, treasurer; and Charles D. Boyles, secretary. 
They constitute the directors of the company, together with O. E. Harden. Charles 
Dickinson is also the vice president of the Chicago Dock Company, serving in this 
position since 1895, while from 1889 he had been one of its directors. He is also one 
of the directors of the Twin City Trading Company of Minneapolis and of the 
American Warehouse & Trading Company of New Jersey. In 1910 he took up the 
position of treasurer and general manager of the Hoboken Manufacturers' Railway 
Company, commonly known as the Hoboken Shore Railroad of Hoboken, New " 
Jersey, and New York harbor, connecting with various ocean steamship lines. He has 
gone abroad many times in the interests of the business, spending several months in 
Europe in 1880, while in 1883 he not only visited insular and continental Europe 
but also Africa. A sojourn of ten months, covering portions of 1894< and 1895, 
enabled liim to visit France, Germany, Russia, Denmark, Turkey and other Euro- 
pean countries, and when he again went abroad in 1900 he remained for an entire 
year, traveling over Europe in the interests of the house, spending five months in 
Russia. He holds membership in the Chicago Board of Trade, the Chicago Stock 
Exchange, the New York Produce Exchange, the Minneapolis Chamber of Com- 
merce, the Duluth Board of Trade and the St. Louis Chamber of Commerce. 

On the 29th of September, 1897, Mr. Dickinson was united in marriage to Mrs. 
Marie I. Boyd, who by her former marriage had five children : William T., Margaret 
F., Henry J., Louise M. and Gordon W. Boyd. The family residence is at No. 1531 



68 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

Dearborn avenue. Mrs. Dickinson died September 17, 1910. Mr. Dickinson bolds 
membership with the Central Meeting of the Society of Friends, and is well known 
in club and social relations. He is a member of the Union League, Illinois, Ger- 
mania, Chicago Athletic, Chicago Automobile, Menoken and South Shore Country 
Clubs. He also belongs to the Lotus, New York, New York Athletic, Railroad and 
Transportation Clubs, of New York city. In 1910 he joined the Aero Club of 
Chicago, having recently turned his attention to aerial navigation. It is his pur- 
pose to buy an airship with the object of studying the question of utilizing air 
currents for commercial and other purposes. He takes a keen interest in all inven- 
tions and projects which promise development and advancement, and progress 
might well be termed the keynote of his character. Not vmmindful of the duties 
and obligations of man to his fellowmen, his humanitarian spirit often finds tangible 
and substantial expression and since the organization of the Iroquois Memorial 
Emergency Hospital he has been one of its trustees and vice president. Those who 
know Mr. Dickinson well — and he has a wide circle of warm friends — recognize in 
him a man of earnest purjjose and of keen appreciation of the interests which attract 
the individual from the narrowing influences of a life entirely devoted to business, 
and yet on occasions there can be found no one who gives closer attention to his 
work than Charles Dickinson, 



JAMES BERWICK FORGAN. 

Great leaders are few. The mass of men seem content to remain in the posi- 
tions in which they are placed by birth, experience or environment. Laudable 
ambition, ready adaptability and a capacity for hard work are essential elements 
of success and in none of the requirements has James Berwick Forgan ever been 
found lacking. It is not a matter of marvel, therefore, that he occupies a promi- 
nent position in the western financial world and enjoys an international reputation 
as a practical, progressive financier. He is numbered among those who have 
developed and formulated the policy of modern finance, working along lines that 
have made his labors a most widely felt and beneficial influence in moneyed circles. 
He stands at the head of Chicago's strongest financial institution as the president 
of the First National Bank. 

Mr. Forgan was born in Saint Andrews, Scotland, April 11, 1852, and is a 
son of Robert and Elizabeth (Berwick) Forgan. After attending the Madras 
College in his native city he continued his studies in Forres Academy, at Forres, 
Scotland, and at the age of seventeen years, after having spent a brief period in 
a lawyer's office, he entered upon active connection with banking as an employe 
of the Royal Bank of Scotland in its Saint Andrews branch. Three years were 
there passed, during which he was initiated into the processes and methods of the 
business, in which he was destined to rise to prominence, winning his promotion 
through his capability, earnest purpose and indefatigable energy. Entering the 
service of the Bank of British North America, he was sent by that institution to 
Montreal, Canada, and for some time filled various clerical positions in its branches 
at Montreal, New York and Halifax, Nova Scotia. In the latter city he left 
the service of the Bank of British North America and became })aying teller for 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 69 

the Bank of Nova Scotia and was afterward assigned to the position of agent of 
the bank at Liverpool, Nova Scotia, and later at Woodstock, New Brunswick. Sub- 
sequently he was promoted to the position of inspector of branches and in 1885 
he established and assumed the management of the branch of the Bank of Nova 
Scotia at Minneapolis, Minnesota, since which time he has been identified with 
banking interests in the United States. Three years later he was invited by the 
directors of the Northwestern National Bank of Minneapolis to become cashier 
of that institution, where he remained until 1892, when, at the request of Lyman 
J. Gage, then president of the Pirst National Bank of Chicago, who had been 
watching the movements and rise of the Scotch financier, he was elected vice presi- 
dent of the First National Bank and on the 9th of January, 1900, succeeded to 
the presidency, thus attaining to the foremost position in banking circles in the 
middle west. He has in the meantime extended his efforts, becoming president 
and director of the First Trust & Savings Bank, also of the National Safe Deposit 
Company and chairman of the board of directors of the Security Bank of Chicago. 
Industrial interests have likewise benefited by the stimulus of his activity and keen 
discernment, and he is now a director of the Standard Safe Deposit Company, the 
American Radiator Company, the Chicago Title & Trust Company, the Guarantee 
Company of North America, the Fidelity & Deposit Company of IVIaryland and 
the Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States, and is a member of the 
board of control of the Audit Company of New York. The enlargement of the 
field of his activities and the increasing worth of his work are due to the fact that 
he has the ability to recognize the opportune moment, to correctly appraise the 
value of a situation and determine its best outcome. 

Mr. Forgan was married in Halifax, Nova Scotia, October 19, 1875, to Miss 
Mary Ellen Murray and they have four children: Robert D., Mrs, Jessie Wilhelmina 
Ott, Donald M. and James B., Jr. The family residence is at No. 1415 Dearborn 
avenue. Mr. Forgan is a member of the Fourth Presbyterian church and a director 
of the Presbyterian hospital of the city. His charities are many but of a most 
unostentatious character. His favorite recreation is golf and leads to his member- 
ship in the Chicago Golf Club. He is also a prominent representative of the 
Chicago Club, the Commercial, Union League, Mid-Day, Union and Saddle and 
Cycle Clubs. A review of his life indicates his wise use of time and talents. 
While he has amassed wealth, he has been generous and helpful in his use of it. 
He recognizes individual resjwnsibility and his charitable work is conducted as is 
his business — from a sense of duty, of privilege and of pleasure. His labors have 
been of far-reaching influence in their breadth, scope and purpose and he has become 
a distinct factor in the progress of the western world. Chicago acknowledges her 
indebtedness to him along many lines. 



PATRICK H. McMAHON. 

Patrick H. McMahon is one of the substantial citizens that Canada has furnished 
to Chicago. He was born in that country on the 19th of October, 185 i, and is a son 
of Patrick and Ellen (Reardon) McMahon, both of whom were natives of Ireland, 
whence they crossed the Atlantic to the new world, establishing their home in Canada 



70 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

in 1850. The father was a farmer by occupation and continued his residence in Canada 
for two decades, or until 1870, when he brought his family to Chicago, arriving in 
this city on the 9th of May of that year. 

Patrick H. McMahon was at that time a youth of fifteen years. He had acquired 
a public school education in Canada and afterward learned the blacksmith's trade, 
becoming an excellent workman. He opened a shop at No. 41 Harmon Court and 
conducted business there successfully for thirteen years, but at length- he determined to 
engage in the undertaking business and in 1890 formed a partnershij^ for that purpose 
under the firm style of Shehan & McMahon, their establishment being located at what 
was then No. 428 West Fourteenth street. The partnership was maintained for two 
years and in 1892 Mr. McMahon bought out Mr. Shehan's interest and admitted his 
brother John to a partnership. In 1900 he opened a place of his own at Taylor 
street and Oakley avenue, while his brother John continued at the old location. Mr. 
McMahon conducted both a livery stable and undertaking parlors, continuing in busi- 
ness there for twelve years. He then established an exclusive livery business at No. 
2211 Harrison street, where he was located for seven years. On the expiration of 
that period he closed out his livery business and in the meantime, in May, 1909, he 
had opened undertaking i^arlors at No. 2074 West Twelfth street, occupying a 
building three stories in height with a twenty-five foot frontage. There he has a 
splendidly equipped establishment, containing a chapel seating one hundred. His 
automobile equipment includes two fine limousines and a motor hearse. His business 
has been developed along thoroughly reliable and honorable lines and has grown 
through the recommendation of his patrons by reason of the excellent service which 
he has rendered. 

'On the 9th of May, 1882, Mr. McMahon was united in marriage to Miss Annie 
Hickey, who was born in Oswego, New York. Their children are: Catherine, who 
is in a convent; Frances, the wife of T. S. O'Donnell, a resident of Chicago; William 
H., who has departed this life; and Charles, who is a member of the Second Illinois 
Infantry of the national army. The religious faith of the family is that of the 
Catholic church, their membership being in St. Charles, in the work of which Mr. 
McMahon takes a most active and helpful part, being recognized as one of its fore- 
most workers. He is also a member of the Holy Name Society and he belongs to 
the Catholic Order of Foresters, the North American Union, the Royal League and 
the Knights of Pythias. A resident of Chicago from his fifteenth year, he is widely 
knoAvn here and he has lived to -w-itness many notable changes in the city during the 
forty-eight years of his connection therewith. He has made for himself an excellent 
place in business circles by his close application, his thorough reliability and his 
earnest efforts to please his patrons, being always tactful and considerate as well as 
thoroughly reliable. 



WILLIAM THORNE CHURCH. 

William Thorne Church, engaged in the active practice of law in Chicago since 
1892, and at present a partner of the firm of Church, Shepard & Day, has wide ac- 
quaintance in club, as well as in legal circles, and in both connections bas Mon the 
high regard of his associates and colleagues. He was born in Wabash, Indiana, 
October 4, 1866, a son of Freeman S. and Advienna (Thorne) Church. His father,. 




WILLIAM T. CHURCH 




i 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 73 

a native of Ohio, engaged in merchandising at Wabash and in 1872 removed to 
Illinois, settling at Gibson, Ford county, where he carried on mercantile pursuits 
until 1890. In that year he removed to Chicago and secured a position as traveling 
salesman, remaining in that connection until his death, which occurred in 1905, when 
he was sixty-one years of age. At the time of the Civil war he responded to the 
country's call for troops, serving for four years with the rank of captain of Com- 
pany B, Forty-seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He was a representative of an 
old Ohio family of English lineage, founded in America about the time of the Rev- 
olutionary war. His wiie was a daughter of William Thorne, a merchant of Ohio, 
who was of Quaker descent. Mrs. Church still survives her husband and is a 
resident of Chicago. In their family were nine children, of whom seven are yet liv- 
ing. Chester W. Church, a brother of William Thorne Church, has been a member 
of the Illinois house of representatives for the past eight years and is a prominent 
figure in political circles of this city. 

Mr. Church completed his literary education in Grand Prairie Seminary at On- 
arga, Illinois, where he won the Bachelor of Science degree in 1888, and then qual- 
ified for the legal profession as a student in the Chicago College of Law, from which 
he was graduated B. L. in 1890. His preliminary reading was done under the 
direction of T. P. Bonfield, and before his admission to the bar, he entered the office 
of Joseph N. Barker as a clerk, continuing in that position until 1892, when he be- 
came a partner of Mr. Barker under the firm style of Barker & Church. In 1902 
Frank L. Shepard was admitted to a partnership and the firm style was changed 
to Barker, Church & Shepard, which firm continued until May 1, 1911, when Mr. 
Clyde L. Day, formerly city attorney of Chicago, came into the firm and the firm 
name was changed to Church, Shepard & Day. In 1902, however, Mr. Barker died 
and Mr. Church became senior member of the firm. Its practice is largely in the field 
of revenue, insurance and real-estate law, and represents many large corporations. 
The firm also engages in general commercial practice and is legal counsel for the 
Franklin Life Insurance Company of Springfield, the Modern Brotherhood of Amer- 
ica, Powers Regulator Company, the Midland Terra Cotta Company, the Erskine M. 
Phelps estate and various other interests. Mr. Church is a member of the Chicago 
Bar Association and is accorded prominence by his fellow members of the legal 
fraternity. 

On the 2d of December, 1903, Mr. Church was united in marriage to Miss Helen 
A. Shoemaker, of Massillon, Ohio, a daughter of Z. T. Shoemaker, president of the 
State Bank of that city. They have one child, Julia, born October 26, 1904. The 
family residence is at No. 9300 I-ongwood boulevard, Beverly Hill, where Mr. 
Church erected an attractive modern residence about three years ago. Mr. Church 
is interested in several projects of a benevolent nature or intended in some way to 
assist and promote the interests of his fellowmen. He was one of the founders and 
is the vice chairman of the board of regents of the Memorial University of Mason 
City, Iowa, a school established by the Sons of the Veterans and patriotic patrons. 
He is prominent and popular in various clubs and societies. He belongs to the Union 
League and Illinois Athletic Clubs, the Association of Commerce, the Beverly 
Country, the Ridge Country, the Chicago Gun, and Chicago 'Fly Casting Clubs and 
the Chicago Sharpshooters Association. These in part indicate the nature of his 
interests and recreation. He is also a member of the Normal Park ^Masonic Lodge, 
of the Loyal Legion and the Sons of Veterans, and as commander of the Illinois Di- 



74 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

vision of the Sons of Veterans, in 1898 he assisted in raising two regiments for the 
Spanish-American war, one of which was mustered into the service of the state. His 
political allegiance has always been given to the republican party and in questions 
of progressive citizenship and of needed reform he is interested. The habit of 
clear analysis inculcated by his law work enables him many times to place correct 
value upon movements for the public good and to such as his judgment sanctions, 
he gives hearty indorsement. 



WALTER H. KROUSKUP. 

Walter H. Krouskup is prominently known among the leading druggists in the 
downtown district of Chicago, conducting a well equipped establishment at Clark and 
Van Buren streets. Illinois numbers him among her native sons. He was born in 
Wesley township. Will county, on the 13th of Ajiril, 1861, his parents being John and 
Mary J. Krouskup, who were farming jieople of that locality. The father has now 
passed away but the mother is still living. 

Walter H. Krousku^j acquired his early education in Wilmington, Illinois. He 
was reared on the old homestead and early became familiar with the best methods 
of tilling the soil and caring for the crops, but he did not wish to pursue an agricultural 
career and felt that he would find more congenial occupation along commercial lines. 
With this end in view he entered the Chicago College of Pharmacy, from which he 
was graduated with the class of 1883. This supplemented two years' apprenticeship 
to the drug trade in Illinois, covering the jjeriod from 1878 until 1880. He also 
engaged in clerking in Chicago while pursuing his pharmaceutical course, and follow- 
ing his graduation he felt that his technical training and his practical experience were 
sufficient to enable him to engage in business on his own account. Therefore in 1883 
he opened a drug store at No. 361 i South State street, where he continued for five 
years. He afterward removed to the corner of Thirty-seventh and State streets, 
where he remained until 1906. He also established 'a store at the corner of Wentworth 
avenue and Thirty-seventh street and conducted it from 1885 until 1894-. He entered 
the downtown district in April, 1900, by purchasing the drug store at the corner of 
Clark and Van Buren streets and this he has since conducted. His store is thoroughly 
modern in its equipment and open twenty-four hours in the day. He has secured a 
corps of competent and courteous assistants and he has put forth every effort for the 
legitimate development of his trade, having now one of the leading drug stres in 
that section of the city. 

In 1881 Mr. Krouskup was united in marriage to Miss Ella G. Sweeney, of 
Chicago, and to them has been born a son, Walter Le Roy, who is in business with 
his father and who is married and has one child. Mr. Krouskup is well known in 
Masonic circles, holding membership in American Lodge, No. 889, A. F. & A. M.; 
Wylie M. Egan Chapter, R. A. M. ; Englewood Commandery, K. T. ; Oriental Con- 
sistory, S. P. R. S. ; and Medinah Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He was made a 
Mason in 1885 and has ever been a loyal and faithful follower of the teachings of 
the craft. In the line of his chosen occupation he is also well known, holding member- 
ship in the Chicago Drug Club and the Chicago Retail Druggists' Association, serving 
for four years on the executive committee of the latter ors;anization. Steadily he has 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 75 

worked his way upward and his success is undoubtedly due in part to the fact that 
he has ever concentrated his efforts along a single line, never dissipating his enero-ies 
over a broad field. He has thoroughly studied every phase of the drug business, 
watches the market, and by the capable conduct of his interests has met with the sub- 
stantial success that is the merited reward of his persistency of purpose, his indefati- 
gable efforts and his sound judgment. 



ROBERT K. SLOAN. 



Robert K. Sloan, who has served as president of the Chicago Undertakers Asso- 
ciation and as president of the Illinois Undertakers Association, is a progressive and 
representative business man in his profession and is, moreover, a wide-awake citizen, 
alert to the opportunities and demands of the times. He made an excellent record 
as a member of the Chicago city council and has always stood for those things which 
he believes to be most helpful in civic interests. He was born in Kingston, Canada, 
August 27, 1860, and is a son of James and Eliza (Scott,) Sloan, who removed to 
Buffalo, New York, upon leaving Canada. In early life the father devoted his atten- 
tion to general agricultural pursuits. 

Robert K. Sloan was reared upon a Canadian farm and acquired a public school 
education. He was one of a family of eleven children. At the age of nineteen years 
he went to the state of New York, where he started out on his own account, being 
employed for a time at farm labor. Later he secured a situation in a cheese factory 
and in 1881 he removed to Chicago, where he was employed as a street car driver on 
the old horse cars. He became a conductor on the line and later was made a clerk in 
the office of the street car company. Gradually he worked his way upward and was 
appointed to the position of division superintendent. In 1896 he entered the under- 
taking business at 281 4 Archer avenue and the following year he established a livery 
business in connection therewith and has maintained a livery barn since that time 
and has also successfully conducted his undertaking business. In 1897 he removed 
to Nos. 2821 and 2823 Archer avenue, where he has since been located, covering a 
period of more than twenty years. Keeping always abreast with the advancement 
and improvement of the times, he is now conducting a large automobile livery but 
caters to the funeral trade and utilizes White, Cunningham and Packard cars. He 
has been a prominent and well known figure in professional circles and his high 
standing is indicated in the fact that he has been elected to the presidency of the 
Chicago Undertakers Association and in 1907 he served as president of the State 
Undertakers Association. He has done everything in his power to advance the 
interests of the profession, especially in the way of securing helpful legislation and 
such legislative enactment as will advance professional standards. 

In 1911 Mr. Sloan was united in marriage to Mrs. Ada Wilson, of Chicago. 
Fraternally Mr. Sloan is well known in Masonic circles. He is a member of Richard 
Cole Lodge, No. 697, A. F. & A. M., of which he is a past master, and he belongs 
to Logan Chapter, No. 196, R. A. M., and to Temple Lodge of the Knights of Pythias. 
His political allegiance is given to the democratic party and in 1902 he was elected 
to represent the fifth ward in the city council, in which he served for two years. He 
was active in advancing legislation for the benefit of the profession and he has stood. 



76 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AXD ITS BUILDERS 

when in public office, for all that is most helpful to the community. He is a good public 
speaker, ready in repartee, strong in argument and clear in his reasoning. He is a 
man of positive character, standing stanchly for Avhat he believes to be right, and his 
position upon any vital question is never an equivocal one. His acquaintances, and 
they are many, see in him a man whom to know is to respect and honor, and his 
genuine personal worth is attested by all who know aught of his career. 



FRANK HAMLINE SCOTT. 

Frank Hamline Scott, largely devoting his attention to corporation law and 
the trial of cases, is a member of the firm of Scott, Bancroft & Stephens. He is 
classed with those men who are the intelligent factors in everj' ideal and work 
that have helped to develop the success and growth of all large cities. Iowa num- 
bers him among her native sons, his birth having occurred at Tipton, January 1, 
1857. His grandfather, Robert Scott, was a native of the north of Ireland and 
of Scotch lineage. Coming to America early in the nineteenth century he settled 
in Brooke county. West Virginia, where he became a leading citizen and the owner 
of a large estate. His son, Dr. Washington Scott, born in the Old Dominion, 
removed to Iowa in 1856 and in 1864 became a resident of Evanston, Illinois, where 
he engaged successfully in the practice of medicine for many years. He contin- 
ued to make his home there until his death, which occurred in 1901 when he was 
seventy-one years of age. He married Amelia Kline, a daughter of John Kline, 
a prominent planter of Brooke county. West Virginia, who was of German descent, 
the family being founded in America about the middle of the eighteenth century. 
Mrs. Scott survived her husband a few years, passing away in 1909, at the age of 
eighty-three. They were the parents of six children, of whom three are living: 
Frank H. ; John W., now a resident of Springfield, Illinois; and Mrs. Richard Old- 
ing Beard, of Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Frank H. Scott was the third in order of birth in his father's family and was 
a little lad of about seven years when the removal was made from Iowa to Evanston. 
He attended the public schools in the latter place and also the preparatory school 
of Northwestern University, after which he there entered upon the regular college 
course in the literary department of the university, being graduated in 1876 Avith 
the Bachelor of Arts degree. Two years later his alma mater conferred upon him 
the ^Master of Arts degree and in the same year he was graduated the degree 
of LL. B. was conferred by the Union College of Law of Chicago. Admitted 
to the bar, he at once began practice in Chicago and in 1886 formed a partner- 
ship with the late John H. Hamline which was continued imtil the latter's death 
in 1904. Mr. Scott then became senior partner of the firm of Scott, Bancroft, 
Lord & Stephens, which relationship was maintained until 1909, since which time, 
following the retirement of Mr. Lord from the firm, he has practiced in con- 
nection with Edgar A. Bancroft, Redmond D. Stephens and John E. jSIacLeish, 
under the firm style of Scott, Bancroft & Stephens. Among the most important 
cases in which he has been retained as counsel is the Northwestern Railroad 
condemnation case involving the longest trial ever held in this state and probably 
in the country, continuing for six months. He was also connected with the litiga- 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 77 

tion in which the ordinances permitting the city to issue seventy-five million 
dollars' Avorth of certificates under the Mueller law was declared invalid and which 
was decided on contentions raised by Mr. Scott. He was also concerned in the 
litigation resulting in the reorganization of the North and West Side Street Rail- 
way Companies in which he represented a large portion of the bondholders. Among 
more recent cases he represented the Economy Light & Power Company in the 
suit brouglit against it by the state of Illinois, involving the title to the Desplaines 
river and the right of the Economy Light & Power Company as riparian owners 
to the increased flow of the river occasioned by the construction of the Chicago 
Sanitary District Channel, in which suit the state was defeated. Mr. Scott is 
counsel for the Chicago Stock Exchange and the United States Gypsum Company 
and many other corporations and is justly accounted one of the prominent corpora- 
tion lawyers of the city. He is a member of the American, Illinois State and 
Chicago Bar Associations and of the Chicago Law Club, of which he is president. 
On the 10th of October, 1882, Mr. Scott was married to Miss Edith Kribben, 
a daughter of Christian and Edith (Delafield) Kribben, the former a prominent 
lawyer and public speaker of St. Louis. Mr. and Mrs. Scott have two living chil- 
dren: Bertram Delafield, a ranch owner at Lemoore, California and Marion 
Sturges. The family reside at the Virginia hotel and are prominent in the social 
circles of the city. For recreation Mr. Scott indulges in golf and horseback riding 
and recognizes the fact that well developed physical manhood is the basis for the 
intense intellectual activity which is demanded in his profession. He belongs to 
a number of the leading clubs and societies of Chicago, including the Chicago, 
Union League, Chicago Literary, University, City, Onwentsia, and Cliff Dwellers 
Clubs, and the Chicago Historical Society. He is a Cleveland democrat but is 
nonpartisan in local politics. In former years he was quite active in civil affairs, 
having served as vice president and also as a member of the executive committee 
of the Municipal League. He was for many years president of the Civil Service 
Reforjn Association and was the first president of the City Club. At all times 
he has stood for progress, development and improvement, for the destruction of 
that which is hurtful, for the ui^building of that which is helpful, and liis labors 
have at all times tended toward the accomplishment of high and worthy purposes. 



OLIVER FRANKLIN FULLER. 

Oliver Franklin Fuller is dean of the wholesale drug trade not only in Chicago. 
but in America, and although he is now nearing the eighty-ninth milestone on life's 
journey, he still, remains active in trade and is found at his desk each morning at 
8:30. His connection with the business interests of Chicago covers the period of 
early pioneer development in this city as well as the years of later day progress 
and prosperity. He was born in Sherman, Connecticut, on the 19th of October, 
1829, and. is a son of Revilo and Caroline E. (IJungerford) Fuller. He is a 
descendant of one of the oldest and most prominent American families. Two of the 
ancestors of the Fuller family in the new world w/;re passengers on the Mayflower 
and other distinguished names appear upon the ancestral records. 



78 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

While spending liis youthful days under the parental roof Oliver Franklin 
Fuller pursued his education in the public schools of Sherman, Connecticut, to the 
age of fourteen years, when his textbooks were put aside and he made his initial 
step in the business world, securing a position in a retail drug house in Peekskill, 
New York. This was in the year 18-ti and he there remained until he had attained 
his majority, when he determined to try his fortune in the new and growing west. 
The year 1852 witnessed his arrival in Chicago. He had already had broad experi- 
ence in connection with the drug trade and, continuing in this line of business, he 
established a wholesale and retail drug house in what was then an embryo city 
comjDared with the present metropolis. Something of the spirit of enterprise which 
dominated the new undertaking is indicated, however, in the fact that in the first 
year the business amounted to fifty-two thousand dollars. The store was located 
at No. 195 Lake street, where Mr. Fuller had rented a building. The Chicago post- 
office in that year was situated on Clark street, between Lake and Randol^^h streets. 
The winter that followed was notable, as was that of 1853 and 1854, from the fact 
that there was no snow in Chicago. From the original location at No. 195 Lake 
street Mr. Fuller removed to No. g^l Lake street and subsequently to Franklin 
street, where his establishment was destroyed by fire. He next located on Market 
street and his was the only wholesale house of any kind left standing in Chicago at 
the time of the great fire of 1871. Business was begun by Mr. Fuller as the senior 
partner in the firm of Fuller & Roberts and later he conducted his interests for a 
time under his own name. At a subsequent period the firm of Fuller & Finch was 
formed, which became successively Fuller, Finch & Fuller and Fuller & FuUer, 
wliile in 1884- the style of The Fuller & Fuller Company was adopted. In 1915 the 
business was consolidated with that of Morrisson, Plummer & Company under the 
name of the Fuller-Morrisson Company, with Mr. James W. ]\Iorrisson as the presi- 
dent. They today have the largest wholesale drug house in the United States, 
situated at No. 540 West Randolph street, occupying a building one hundred and 
fifty by one hundred and fifty feet and six stories in height with basement. It was 
completed in the spring of 1917 and was occupied by the firm on the 1st of May of 
that year. It is splendidly equipped, having been built for the purpose used, is 
supplied with a sprinkler system and has all modern facilities to promote the work 
there carried on. Since the organization of the jjresent Fuller-]Morrisson Company, 
Mr. Fuller has been chairman of the board of directors, and although he is now 
almost a nonagenarian, he is still an active factor in business circles, retaining the 
keenest interest in every branch of the institution which has been built up largely 
through his close application, his unremitting energy and his keen sagacity. He 
has ever enjoyed the game of business and throughout his entire career has fol- 
lowed constructive methods, his path never being strewn with the wreck of other 
men's failures. Opportunity has been to him the call to action and enterprise has 
guided him at all times in the conduct of his business affairs. 

On the 8th of November, 1858, Mr. Fuller was united in marriage to Miss Phoebe 
Ann Shipley, of Peekskill, New York, who died in March, 1901, leaving two sons, 
Frank Revilo and Charles, who became associated with their father in the active 
management and control of the extensive wholesale drug house built up under the 
Fuller name and became vice presidents of the Fuller-Morrison Company. Frank 
R. Fuller died in 1915. In 1911 Charles Fuller married Miss Rebecca Reynolds 
Secor, of Ossining, New York, whom he had known from her early girlhood. 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 79 

From the organization of the republican party Mr. Fuller has always been one 
of its stalwart champions and supporters, and while not an office seeker, he has 
ever kept informed concerning the vital questions and problems of the country and 
with relation to these has kept abreast with the best thinking men of the age. While 
he has never sought political preferment, he has not been remiss in the duties of 
citizenship but on the contrary has co-operated in many well defined plans and 
measures toward advancing the interests of city and state. His recreation has come 
to him through travel and through literature. He has always been extremely fond 
of reading and many of his happiest hours have been spent in his library among 
the men of master minds. Mr. Fuller is the honorary life president of the Chicago 
Veteran Druggists Association, and has the distinction of being the only wholesale 
druggist this society of veteran retail men has ever seen fit to honor with member- 
ship. Mr. Fuller is a life member of the Art Institute, of the Field Museum of 
Natural History, The Academy of Science, and of the Chicago Historical Society. 
No history of Chicago's commercial development could be complete without mention j 

of Oliver F. Fuller, who for two-thirds of a century has been a rei^resentative of 
mercantile interests here. No event that has had bearing upon the history of the 
city in its development and progress through all these years is unfamiliar to him 
and there are few men who can speak with so great authority concerning the events 
which have left their impress upon the annals of city and state. 



LEWIS VERNON GUSTIN. 

Lewis Vernon Gustin has been connected with the undertaking business in 
Chicago for the last twenty years and since being established independently has built 
up a business of gratifying proportions. He is a member of the firm of Barbour & 
Gustin, conducting business at 4141 Cottage Grove avenue. He was born in Peru, 
Indiana, September 3, 1875, and acquired a public school education. His connection 
with the undertaking business in this city was not his initial experience, however, 
along this line. He became connected with the business in 1895 in Rochester, New 
York, and the following year removed to Chicago, where he was in the employ of 
others for an extended period, but on the 3d of July, 1917, he entered into his present 
Dartnership relation as junior member of the firm of Barbour & Gustin. They opened 
undertaking parlors at No. 4141 Cottage Grove avenue, remodeling the building, 
which has light all around. The building is a one-story and basement structure, fifty 
by one hundred feet, and contains a chapel with a seating capacity of one hundred and 
fifty. There is a beautiful reception room finished in old ivory, with reed furniture. 
Their equipment includes automobile service and they carry a large line of caskets 
and undertaking supplies, while they are ready to conduct business according to the 
most advanced methods of the profession, ^ - ' 

Mr. Gustin is married and has one child. He is well known in Masonic connec- 
tions, being a past master of Carnation Lodge, No. 900, A. F. & A. M. He is also 
a past high priest of Fairview Chapter, R. A. M., and a past eminent commander of 
Montjoie Commandery, No. 53, K. T. In his life he exemplifies the beneficent spirit 
of the craft, which is based upon a recognition of the brotherhood of mankind and the 
obligations thereby imposed. In politics he is an independent republican, usually 



80 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

voting for the men and measures of the republican party yet not holding himself down 
to party ties Avhen his judgment suggests that some other course would be preferable. 
He stands for that which is progressive in citizenship and is ever loyal to the best 
interests of city, commonwealth and country. His religious faith is that of the 
Methodist church and his life is guided by its principles. Since making his initial step 
in the business world he has advanced steadily and is today controlling important 
interests which are constantly growing. 



ORSOX SMITH. 



Orson Smith, president of the Merchants Loan & Trust Company, is one of 
the oldest native born active business men of Chicago. Now in his seventy-first 
year, he is one of the most vigorous, energetic financiers of the city. His experi- 
ence has been of wide range as he has progressed from the position of bundle 
boy in a retail dry-goods store to the presidency of the Merchants Loan & Trust 
Company. His parents, Orson and Mary Ann Smith, were among the pioneer 
residents of this city and here the son was born December 14, ISil. He acquired 
his education in the private and public schools of Chicago, but put aside his text- 
books at the age of thirteen to enter business life as bundle boy in a retail dry- 
goods store then conducted by Potter Palmer. A year later, however, he entered 
the financial field, securing a clerical position in the banking house of F. Granger 
Adams, which institution was later converted into the Traders Bank and afterward 
became the Traders National Bank. In the latter Mr. Smith worked his way 
upward to the position of chief clerk and assistant cashier, and from 1870 until 
1884 was cashier of the Corn Exchange National Bank and the Corn Exchange 
Bank. He then accepted the position of vice president in the ]Merchants Loan 
& Trust Company, so continuing until 1898, when he was elected to the presi- 
dency. This has become one of the strongest banks of the city and in the volume 
of its business scarcely takes second rank to any. In fact it is numbered with 
those extensive and substantial financial institutions which are guiding the activi- 
ties and shaping the destinies of this great commercial metropolis. Every de- 
partment of banking is in operation that promotes and safeguards the interests 
of the institution and depositors. Aside from this connection with the Merchants 
Loan & Trust Company Mr. Smith is also a trustee of the London Guaranty & 
Accident Company of London, England, is a member and was the treasurer of 
the Chicago Board of Trade from 1872 until 1884, and is at the present writing 
a member of the Chicago Stock Exchange. He is likewise a member of the 
executive committee of the Chicago Clearing House Association. 

On the 14th of December, 1871, Mr. Smith was married to Miss Anna M. 
Rice, the youngest daughter of the Hon. B. and Mar^- Ann Rice. Her father 
was for tAvo terms mayor of Chicago and represented the first district in Congress. 
Mr. Smith's residence at No. 50 Bellevue place, was erected by him in 1885 and 
has since been his home. He is a member of the Chicago, Union, the Onwentsia 
and the Exmoor Clubs, and was formerlv identified with the Washington Park 
Club. He is also a member of the Veteran Sons and Daughters of Chicago— a 
distinction of which he has every reason to be proud. His recreation is golf and 




ORSOX SMITH 



THE NEW YOl;.. 
PUBLIC LIBRAIIY 



ASTOn. LENOX AND 
TILDEN FOUNDATnyNS 
B L 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 83 

fishing. While now in his seventy-first year he is a man of robust appearance, 
splendidly preserved for his age, a fact which is attributable to regular habits 
and observance of nature's laws. He has traveled quite extensively in company 
with his wife, both in the United States and abroad, and his exalted social position 
brings him into contact with men and women of the highest culture and accom- 
plishment, and especially those who from the period of Chicago's pioneer develop- 
ment have been prominent in the affairs of the city and have been most active in 
shaping its destiny along the lines of material, intellectual, social, aesthetic and 
moral progress. 



FRANZ G. SPREYNE. 



Franz G. Spreyne, who has been connected with the undertaking business in 
Chicago for more than thirty-five years, is a native of German}^, where his birth 
occurred July 8, 1848. He learned the confectioner's trade in that country and 
afterward went to France, where he remained for two years, but since 1867 he has 
been a resident of the United States, covering more than half a century. He arrived 
in this country on the 4th of July of that year and remained in New York, where he 
landed, for a year and a half. He then removed to the west, making his way to 
Omaha and the Black Hills, continuing in that section of the country for two years. 
Later he became a resident of Kansas City, where he remained for two years, and 
there he conducted a bakery on his own account. He afterward sang in opera for 
six months and in 1873 became a resident of Chicago, where he has since made his 
home, covering a period of more than forty-four years. He was first engaged in the 
confectionery business in this city and later was connected with the Grand Pacific 
Hotel for three years. He was likewise on the police force for three years, or from 
1876 until 1879. He then embarked in business on his own account, opening a 
bakery, which he conducted for three years, or until 1882, when he became identified 
with the undertaking business in association with his father-in-law, Andrew 
Podolsky, who had established the business in 1869 on Archer and Wentworth 
avenues. In 1884 a building was erected at No. 4026 South State street, a building 
which has a frontage of twenty-five feet and in which the business has since been 
carried on. The chapel has a seating capacity of sixty, so that there is ample 
arrangement for conducting funeral services. However, they are now erecting a 
three story building at No. 6328 Cottage Grove avenue, which will contain one of 
the finest chapels in the west. That Mr. Spreyne has been successful in business 
is indicated in the fact that he has continued in that line since 1882. 

In 1876 Mr. Spreyne was united in marriage to Miss Helene Podolsky, of 
Chicago, and they have become the parents of eleven children, but only three are 
now living: Frank F., who is in business with his father; Daisy, who is the wife 
of Frank Johnston ; and Andrew. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Lutheran church and in political 
belief Mr. 'Spreyne is independent, casting his ballot only after studying the 
exigencies of the case and the capability of the candidate. He is prominent in 
Masonic circles, belonging to Constantia Lodge, No. 783, A. F. & A. M., while in 
Scottish Rite Masonry he has attained the thirty-second degree in the consistory. 



vol. IV— 5 



84 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

He is also a member of Medinah Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., and is a most loyal 
follower of the craft, recognizing its underlying truth concerning the brotherhood 
of mankind and the obligations thereby imposed. 



FRANK F. SPREYNE. 



Frank F. Spreyne, a partner in the undertaking firm of F. G. Spreyne & Son,, 
was born in Chicago, January 29, 1879. He supplemented his public school educa- 
tion by study in Br^^ant & Stratton's Commercial College, from which in due course 
of time he was graduated, and later he attended the Metropolitan Business College. 
He was sixteen years of age when he entered the undertaking business in connection 
with his father and he is a graduate of Clarke's School of Embalming, also of Sulli- 
van's School of Embalming and the Barnes School of Embalming. He has thus 
kept in close touch with the most advanced and scientific methods and principles 
which underlie the profession and his care and tactfulness in conducting funeral 
services has been one of the strong features in the growing success of the firm. 

Mr. Spreyne was reared in the Lutheran church and has always been a loyal 
follower of its teachings. In politics he maintains an independent course. Fra- 
ternally he is connected with Waldeck Lodge, No. 687, A. F. & A. M.; with Jackson 
Park Chapter, No. 222, R. A. M.; with Woodlawn Council, No. 92, R. & S. M. ; 
Woodlawn Commandery, No. 76, K. T. ; and Medinah Temple of the Mystic 
Shrine. He also has membership with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Knights & 
Ladies of Honor, the North American Union, the Knights of The Maccabees and 
the Woodmen of the World. He is likewise connected with the Foresters and with 
the Chaldean Order of Optimists and he is a charter member of the Chicago Under- 
takers Association. He looks at life from a broad standpoint, in his business tem- 
pers progressiveness with a safe conservatism, and as the years have passed he has 
gained a wide and favorable acquaintance in professional and fraternal circles. 



CHARLES BURRALL PIKE. 

Experienced in the ways of progressive business life and by training and edu- 
cation naturally fitted for the high position he has won, Charles Burrall Pike has 
stood as a splendid representative of the younger group of financiers in Chicago 
who have largely contributed to the material upbuilding of banking interests here. 
There are few, if any, instances in our local history where a man of his years has 
within a decade succeeded in establishing a national bank and developing it to the 
present extensive proportions which indicate the breadth and the scope of the 
business of the Hamilton National. Natural predilection, environment or inher- 
ited tendency maj^ have had something to do with Mr. Pike's success in the field of 
banking and yet all those influences are of little avail without the strong jnirpose, 
the indomitable energy and the keen insight of the individual who undertakes the 
task. Charles Burrall Pike, however, is a son of Eugene S. Pike, prominent in 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 85 

the banking interests of the city. His mother was in her maidenhood Miss Mary 
Rockwell^ of Painesville, Ohio. His paternal grandparents were Daniel Harmon 
and Jerusha (Hartwell) Pike. Charles Burrall Pike was born in Chicago, June 
29, 1871, only a few months before the memorable fire, which practically wiped out 
the business district of the city. His educational advantages were such as fitted 
him for both the profession which he first adopted and for his later financial career. 
He was graduated from Harvard University with the Bachelor of Arts degree in 
1893, when twenty-two years of age, and three years later he completed a course 
in the Harvard Law School and won the LL. B. degree. Returning to his native 
city, he entered upon the practice of law, in which he continued as a member of 
the firm of Pike & Gode until January, 1901. It was at that date that he entered 
into active connection with banking interests as vice president of the Western State 
Bank, later the Western Trust & Savings Bank, so continuing until July, 1902. 
Recognizing that there was still a field for other banking enterprises in the city, 
in April, 1903, he established the Hamilton National Bank at the former quarters 
of one of the oldest financial institutions of Chicago. The location was outside 
the generally prescribed and accepted banking circle, but that the institution met 
a need in the city was manifest by the large clientele that immediately supported 
it, becoming the nucleus of the present banking business which is represented by 
a capitalization of five hundred thousand dollars and deposits approximately eight 
million dollars. From its original location the Hamilton National Bank was removed 
to its present quarters and its business has continued to develop along lines where 
conservatism and progressiveness are well balanced factors. Mr. Pike is also presi- 
dent of the Merchants Safe Deposit Company and has established his right to 
rank with Chicago's leading financiers. 

In 1898 Mr. Pike was married at Washington, D. C, to Miss Frances Alger, 
a daughter of Senator Alger, one of the most widely known of Michigan's states- 
men and the recognized peer of many of the most distinguished citizens of the 
United States. In social circles Mr. Pike has become well known as a member of 
the Chicago Club, University Club, the Chicago Athletic Club, the Onwentsia 
Club, and the Saddle and Cycle Club. He is prominent in the social life on the 
north side, making his home at Lake Forest, and is a genial host. His interest in 
public affairs is manifest in active cooperation in movements for the city's good, 
and the effective work that he has done in social, municipal and business circles 
indicates a many-sided and strongly developed nature. He has been able to meet 
the demands made in this age of unusual business activity and while one of the 
youngest of Chicago's financiers is also recognized as one of the ablest. 



SENECA D. KIMBARK. 



While Seneca D. Kimbark was the promoter of one of the most extensive and 
important industrial enterprises of Chicago, aside from this his memory should 
be honored for all time as one of the commissioners who had in charge the laying 
out of the south park system and in securing to the city the lake front park, which 
otherwise would have become the victim of corporation greed. Since his arrival 
in Chicago fifty-eight years have been added to the cycle of the centuries. He 



86 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

came here a young man, having not yet attained his majority. The future with 
its limitless opportunities was before him. He has long since passed the Psalmist's 
allotted three score years and ten but is still an honored and valued resident of 
the western metropolis, which owes not a little of its material progress and pros- 
perity to his labors, his business enterprise, his sagacity and public spirit. 

Mr. Kimbark was born in Venice, Cayuga county, New York, on the 4th of 
March, 1832, his parents being Adam C. and Sarah (Masten) Kimbark. He was 
a lad of eight years when the family removed to Livingston county, New York, 
where he remained until he sought a home in the middle west. His educational 
opportunities were far above those which the average boy enjoyed. He attended 
the district schools and later had the benefit of instruction in the Geneseo and 
Canandaigua academies, meeting the expenses of his more advanced courses with 
the salary which he had earned as a teacher in the country schools. He early 
had thorough training in the work of the home farm and to the tasks of plo^ving, 
planting and harvesting he devoted his energies until his removal to the west save 
for the period spent in attending and teaching school. 

About the time he attained his majority Mr. Kimbark came to Chicago. His 
interest had been aroused in the growing western city and, believing that superior 
business opportunities might here be obtained, he made his way to Chicago and 
entered business circles in connection with the firm of E. G. Hall & Company in 
the iron trade. He was soon admitted to partnership and the business was con- 
tinued successfully under the original style until 1860, when the name of the firm 
was changed to Hall, Kimbark & Company. Various changes in partnership have 
since occurred, leading to the adoption of the firm name of Kimbark Brothers & 
Company in 1873, while in 1876 Seneca D. Kimbark became the sole proprietor 
of the immense business which had been develoiDed. Heavy losses were caused 
by the great fire of 1871 but his business energy and tact brought him safely 
through difficulties that M-ould have permanently hampered a man of less sagacity 
and courage. The business continued to grow under his careful guidance until 
his establishment became the largest of its kind in Chicago, while its commercial 
integrity and high standing were ever preserved, unaffected by changes and fluctua- 
tions in the business world. The best commentary upon his enterprise and per- 
severance is the immense establishment which he built up and which rests upon 
the foundation of unassailable commercial integrity as well as unfaltering industry 
and progressiveness. It has been said of him: "His notions of business honor 
are so broad that he never makes a distinction between commercial and moral 
integrity." After managing his Chicago interests capably and successfully for a 
number of years Mr. Kimbark opened a factory for the manufacture of carriage 
woodwork in Quincy, Michigan. Preferring to have tliis branch of his business con- 
ducted at a point where lie might more readily give it personal supervision, he 
removed the factory to Elkhart, Indiana, in 1891, thus securing excellent trans- 
portation facilities, while an abundance of hardwood lumber was easily secured. 
The main building of the factory was four hundred by eighty feet and near by was 
an engine house and bending room, one hundred and eighty by forty feet. The 
plant was equipped with machines of the latest design, thirteen of which were 
built after original plans of wliich Mr. Kimbark was the owner. His success and 
prosperity were largely due to the fact that he not only gave close attention to 
his business but regarded no detail as too unimportant to claim his attention. He 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 87 

familiarized himself with the trade in every department and was thus able to pass 
in judgment upon any part of the work. The regard in which he was held by 
business colleagues and contemporaries has been repeatedly manifest in trade con- 
ventions, where his unaffected manners and quick perceptions always commanded 
respect. He remained an active factor in the business world until 1905, when at 
the age of seventy-three years he retired, his business interests being now under 
the supervision of his son, Charles A. 

While his commercial and industrial interests have constituted an important 
chapter in his history, his service in public affairs has been most valuable and 
alone entitles him to the consideration and gratitude of his fellowmen. At all 
times he has been actuated by a spirit of loyal devotion to the general good and 
in discharging public duties devolving upon him he has brought to his work the 
same thoroughness, keen insight and enterprise that ever characterized him in the 
conduct of private business interests. Appointment made him one of the three com- 
missioners named to locate the south park system. To the question he gave most 
earnest and thoughtful consideration, viewed it from every possible standpoint and 
recognized what would be the necessities of the future for park area. His asso- 
ciates on the commission board were Chauncey T. Bowen and James H. Rees, 
who were in perfect accord with him in his opinions upon the matter. The result 
of their consideration and study of the question led to the selection of Washington 
and Jackson parks and the now famous boulevard drive known as the Midway. 
The conservative and unprogressive element of Chicago claimed that the sites 
chosen were too far south. The commissioners, however, seemed to possess remark- 
able insight into what the future had in store and Mr. Kimbark and his associates 
have a claim upon public gratitude for the sound philosophy which prompted their 
choice. To Mr. Kimbark, perhaps more than any other, is due the fact that the 
lake front park has been preserved to the city. Never a man of hasty opinions, 
Mr. Kimbark has ever drawn his conclusions from comprehensive knowledge of 
the subject involved and in this, as in other important questions, he examined care- 
fully into the rights of the respective parties with the result that he believed the 
lake front park should be Chicago's inheritance for her people. He therefore put 
forth intelligent and persistent hostility to every encroachment upon this right and 
today Chicago has in the center of her down town district the beautiful Grant 
park, bordering the lake. 

Political preferment has had no attraction for Mr. Kimbark, who has repeatedly 
refused to become candidate for offices that were proffered him. The repeal of 
the Missouri compromise led him to sever his connection with the democratic party, 
to which he had formerly given his support. He had been a warm advocate of 
the annexation of Texas and of other measures achieved through democratic strength. 
His study of the slavery question in every phase led him to become an abolitionist 
and when the republican party was formed to prevent the further extension of 
slavery in the north he joined its ranks and has never wavered in his support 
thereof to the present time. He was one of the most stalwart supporters of the 
Union cau&e during the period of the Civil war and was a most generous contributor 
to the war fund. He has been in harmony with the party in all of its progressive 
movements that have furthered the welfare of state and nation and believes that 
history has proven its worth and that its leaders will be men of patriotism and 



88 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

progress, seeking the welfare of the country rather than the aggrandizement of 
self. 

On the 25th of September, 1856, was celebrated the marriage of Seneca Kim- 
bark and Elizabeth Pruyne, a daughter of Hon. Peter Pruyne, at one time a 
colleague of Stephen A. Douglas in the state senate. After the death of her first 
husband Mrs. Pruyne, the mother of Mrs. Kimbark, became the wife of Thomas 
Church, an early citizen of Chicago. Mrs. Kimbark was here born on the day 
which witnessed the inauguration of William B. Ogden, Chicago's first mayor, May 
2, 1837. Her ready wit, bright intellectual powers, kindly disposition and genial 
manners have won for her a circle of friends which mere social prominence could 
not attract. Her charities are liberal and continuous but usually bestowed with 
that i^ersonal supervision which renders them doubly welcome to the recijiient. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Kimbark were born two sons and two daughters. The eldest, 
Charles A. Kimbark, is the financial manager of his father's business affairs. The 
younger son, Walter, is noAV deceased. The daughters are Mary Rebecca and 
Grace, the latter the wife of F. J. Howell of New York and the mother of one 
son, Kimbark Howell. 

While Mr. Kimbark does not subscribe to the creeds and doctrines of many 
orthodox churches, he is a believer in the teachings and permanency of Christian 
principles and has guided his actions by the Divine injunction of doing unto 
others as he would have them do unto him. In the social life of the city he has 
been well known. He became one of the organizers of the Chicago Club and also 
a charter member of the Washington Park Club. He likewise joined the Calumet 
Club and while not active in any of these at the present time, he is honored in 
the membership of the different organizations as well as in the Union League Club, 
of which for many years he has been a most prominent representative. He has 
been especially active in the work of the last named in its efforts to establish a 
higher standard of municipal service and integrity. In all of his life, whether 
in its business, public or social relations, he has never deviated from a course that 
he has believed to be right between himself and his fellowman. To such the world 
instinctively pays deference, and regard and honor are freely accorded Seneca D. 
Kimbark. 



CHARLES J. DAHLGREN. 

Charles J. Dahlgren, who for almost three decades has been engaged in the under- 
taking business in Chicago, was born in Sweden, March 15, 1858. and is a son of 
John and Anna Dahlgren. The mother passed away in Sweden, but the father came 
to the United States in 1869 and made his way into the interior of the country, settling 
in Chicago, where he engaged in the lumber business for about twenty-three years or 
until his death, which occurred in 1892. 

Charles J. Dahlgren was brought to the United States when a lad of eleven years. 
He acquired a public school education and after his textbooks were put aside entered 
the employ of the Rock Island Railroad Company, with which he was connected for a 
few years. His attention, however, was directed to the undertaking business and in 
1889 he opened an undertaking establishment at 5725 Wentworth avenue. Later he 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 89 

erected a building at 5822 Wentworth avenue, this being in 1905. Here he has a 
two-story structure with twenty-five foot frontage and containing a well appointed 
chapel with seating capacity for one hundred and twenty-five. He also has auto equip- 
ment for the conduct of funerals and the care, tact and thoughtfulness which he dis- 
plays in funeral directing have won for him the gratitude of hundreds of families in 
bereavement, who, endorsing his services to friends and neighbors, have thereby 
largely augmented his patronage. He has been a member of the Chicago Undertakers' 
Association since it was organized and is much interested in its plans and purposes and 
in its efforts to establish higher professional standards. 

In 1879, Mr. Dahlgren was united in marriage to Miss Amelia Carlson, who was 
born in Sweden, a daughter of Axel Carlson, who removed with his family to Chicago 
about 1868. Mr. and Mrs. Dahlgren have become parents of five children but lost 
their first born, August, in infancy. The others are: Oscar, who is in the employ of 
the city of Chicago and who is married and has five children ; John Albert, who is in 
business with his father but is now serving his country as private in the department of 
registration of soldiers' graves and is located in Washington, D. C, and has a wife 
and two children; Anna, the wife of E. H. Johnson, of Chicago, by whom she has one 
child ; and Walter G., who is also in business with his father, and is also serving his 
country against the kaiser. 

In his fraternal relations Mr. Dahlgren is an Odd Fellow and is also connected 
with the Royal Arcanum, while his religious faith is that of the Lutheran church. In 
politics he is an earnest, republican and has been somewhat active in political circles, 
servino; as countv commissioner from 1898 until 1900 inclusive. He is interested in 
all that has to do with the welfare and upbuilding of his city and stands loyally in 
support of any project or measure which he believes will prove beneficial. He has 
been a member of the Chicago Undertakers' Association since it was organized and 
he enjoys the respect and goodwill of colleagues and contemporaries in the profession. 
From early boyhood he has made his home in Chicago, the period of his residence here 
covering almost a half century, during which time he has witnessed notable changes 
as the city has emerged from the conditions of a small but rapidly growing town and 
has taken on metropolitan existence. 



JOHN EDWIN SCOTT. 



A life of intense and well directed activity along mercantile lines has brought 
John Edwin Scott to a position where he can now enjoy Test from further labor, 
although he is still interested in the well known firm of Carson, Pirie, Scott & 
Company, long prominent in the commercial circles of Chicago. He was born in 
Rathfriland, County Down, Ireland, August 22, 1843, a son of Thomas and Martha 
(Swan) Scott. The family is of Scotch origin and has long been established in Ire- 
land, representatives of the name settling near Belfast, where the family has now 
been founded for many generations. In May, 1856, Thomas Scott, with his wife 
and twelve children, came to America on a sailing vessel. After a few months spent 
in New York they made their way into the interior of the country, settling first at 
Mendota, Illinois. It was there that in 1858, when fifteen years of age, John E. 
Scott entered the field of general merchandising in connection with Messrs. Carson 



90 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

and Pirie, who had several general stores in that section. He remained at that 
point mitil 1866, when he engaged in the dry-goods business for himself in Ottawa, 
Illinois. For a quarter of a century thereafter he was closely associated with mer- 
cantile interests in that city, occupying a prominent and honored position in its 
commercial circles. In 1891, however, he disposed of his interests there and came 
to Chicago, where he entered the firm of Carson, Pirie, Scott & Company, of which 
his two brothers, George and Robert S., were members. He continued an active 
factor in the firm until 1907, when he retired. 

Throughout the j'ears of his residence in Chicago Mr. Scott has been interested 
in civic affairs in a general way and his cooperation has been an effective force for 
progress and improvement. He was one of the original directors of the National 
Association of Merchants & Travelers out of which grew the Chicago Association 
of Commerce, and he was a member of many local organizations of Evanston of 
material benefit to that city, where he resided until a year ago, when he removed 
to Pasadena, California. 

On the 2d of February, 1869, in Ottawa, Illinois, Mr. Scott was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Harriet Emma Hossack, a daughter of John Hossack, a native of 
Scotland, prominent in the late '50s as an aggressive abolitionist and one of the 
original contractors on the Illinois and Michigan canal. Mr. and Mrs. Scott became 
the parents of three sons, John William, Robert Lindsay and Frederick H. 
The family have not only been prominent in the social activities of Evanston but 
have also taken a helpful interest in church and philanthropic work. Mr. and Mrs. 
Scott were members of the First Baptist church of Evanston, in which he was an 
officer for many years, but being now residents of Pasadena, California, are 
members of the Baptist church there. All of his life he has been very active in 
the different departments of church work and of the Sunday school, and in all these 
relations his wife has been his able coworker. She was president of the Women's 
Baptist Foreign Missionary Society of the West for ten years, or until 1909, and 
upon her retirement from that position was elected honorary president for life. 
Prompted by the spirit of broad humanitarianism, they have constantly reached 
out a helping hand to fellow travelers upon life's journey and have given generously 
of time and means for charity and philanthropy. Never loving wealth for its 
own sake, Mr. Scott has rejoiced in his success because of the opportunity it has 
given him to assist others where aid was needed and to give to the church and its 
kindred interests that financial support which must ever be a feature in carrying 
on the work of any religious organization. 



JULIUS R. BUTZOW. 



Julius R. Butzow, who since 1885 has been a member of the Chicago Undertakers 
Association, arguing long connection, therefore, with the line of business in which he 
is still engaged, is now located at 4039 West Madison street, to which place he 
removed in September, 1915. He is one of Chicago's native sons, his birth having 
occurred in this city on the 17th of October, 1863. His parents, Joachim and 
Sophia Butzow, were natives of ]Mecklenburg, Germany. They came to the United 
States in the early '50s and were married in Chicago, where the family has now 




JULIUS E. BUTZOW 



i'UBLIC Umi.UlY 






CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 93 

been represented for almost three-fourths of a century. The father was a cabinet 
maker by trade and entered upon business on his own account in young manhood, 
devoting his attention to cabinet making and furniture manufacturing, in which 
connection he developed a business of substantial proportions. He has passed away 
but is still survived by his widow, who is now eighty-six years of age and who in the 
summer of 1917 drove with her son in an automobile from Ardmore, Oklahoma, to 
Chicago, which indicates how remarkably well preserved she is to stand such a trip. 
By her marriage she became the mother of six children, two of whom have passed 
away. The family record is as follows : Albert C, who is now a resident of Ardmore, 
Oklahoma ; Amanda, who has departed this life ; William, who still makes his home 
in Chicago; Julius R., of this review; Emma, who has also passed away; and Clara, 
who is the wife of Joseph Kruger, also living in Ardmore, Oklahoma. 

Spending his youthful days in his native city, Julius R. Butzow pursued a public 
school course and was graduated from the Foster school. In his early life he learned 
the upholsterer's trade but did not follow it. On the contrary he turned his attention 
to the undertaking business in 1885, entering into that line of activity in connection 
with his two brothers at Nos. 530 and 532 Ogden avenue. They likewise conducted 
a feed, coal and livery business and the association between them was maintained 
until about 1889, when Mr. Butzow dissolved partnership with his brothers and con- 
tinued his efforts in the undertaking field. In September, 1915, he removed his busi- 
ness to 4039 West Madison street, where he occupies a building with a frontage of 
twenty-five feet that is splendidly arranged and equipped for his purpose. It con- 
tains a chapel with a seating capacity of two hundred, so that funeral services may 
there be held. He is regarded as a most capable funeral director, closely, tactfully 
and thoughtfully following out the wishes of the families whom he is called to 
serve, and with the passing years his business has grown in volume and importance 
until he is now one of the leading undertakers of his section of the city. He is well 
known in the Chicago Undertakers Association, with which he has been identified for 
a third of a century. 

In October, 1889, Mr. Butzow was united in marriage to Miss Louise Enderli, of 
Cleveland, Ohio, and they have three children: Clarence, who is a sales engineer for 
the Automatic Electric Company; Norman, who is with the Albert Dickinson Seed 
Company of Chicago; and Elmer, who is serving on a submarine chaser but before 
his enlistment for service was with the International Harvester Company, in the 
farm sales department. 

Mr. Butzow is well known in Masonic circles. He has membership in Golden 
Rule Lodge, No. 726, A. F. & A. M., of which he was master in 1903. He belongs 
also to York Chapter, No. 148, R. A. M., of which he is a past high priest, and to 
Tyrian Council, No. 78, R. & S. M. He is likewise a past thrice illustrious master 
of the last named. His membership connections have made him a representative of 
Columbia Commandery, No. 63, K. T., of which he was eminent commander in 1910, 
and he belongs to Oriental Consistory, S. P. R. S.; to Paragon Chapter, No. 557, 
O. E. S., of which he is a past patron; and to Medinah Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., 
of which he was potentate in 1916. He is likewise connected with the Royal League, 
his membership being in Washington Council, No. 53, and he belongs to the Illinois 
Club and to the German Club of Chicago. In politics he is a republican, stanchly 
supporting the men and measures of the pary but without desire for office, as he has 
always preferred to concentrate his efforts and attention upon his business affairs 



94 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

and private interests. Whatever success he has achieved is the direct result of 
his close application, his indefatigable energ^^ and his perseverance, combined with 
an earnest desire to please his patrons, who speak of him in terms of high regard, as 
do his fellow members of the Masonic fraternity. 



JAMES HERRON ECKELS. 

"James Herron Eckels," said Grover Cleveland, "illustrated the traits that 
make the best American citizenship." Ancestral connection or the aid of influen- 
tial friends were never factors in the attainment of distinction in the life of Mr. 
Eckels but personal ability brought him to a prominent position among men of 
national fame. Save for the period spent in Washington as comptroller of the 
currency, Mr. Eckels was a lifelong resident of Illinois and at the time of his 
death was officially and financially connected with some of the most important 
business enterprises of Chicago. He was born in Princeton, Illinois, November 
22, 1858, his parents being James Starr and Margaret (Herron) Eckels. He 
traced his ancestry back to Nathaniel Eckels, a native of Belfast, Ireland, who 
came to America at an early period in the colonization of this country. His paternal 
grandparents, William and Jane (Starr) Eckels, were natives of Cumberland 
county, Pennsylvania. The former, born March 3, 1787, always followed farming 
as a life work and was an active and zealous member of the Presbyterian church. 
He died November 15, 1861, while his wife passed away December 23, 1830, when 
about forty years of age. 

Their son, James S. Eckels, was born in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, 
December 7, 1827, and was reared amid the usual environment of farm life. He 
supplemented his early education, acquired in the district schools, by the regular 
course in Jeft'erson College of Pennsylvania, being graduated with honors as a 
member of the class of 1853. He then took up the study of law and after reading 
privately for a time entered the Albany Law School, from which he was graduated 
in 1857. With his diploma as proof of what he had done in preparation for the 
bar, he started for Illinois and, locating in Princeton, became one of the distin- 
guished attorneys of that city. It is said that he had no superiors and few equals 
as a trial lawyer in Bureau county and won prominence as Avell as a counselor. 
His ready command of language, combined with his thorough and comprehensive 
knowledge of the principles of jurisprudence, rendered him an effective speaker, 
while his analvtical mind made his address to court or iurv at all times logical. 
He was married in Pennsylvania, October 19, 1851, to Margaret Davidson Herron, 
a daughter of James and Isabelle (Johnson) Herron, of Cumberland county, Penn- 
sylvania, where Mrs. Eckels was born December 23, 1830. By her marriage she 
had four children: Frank J., James H., Jane Isabelle and George M. The death 
of Mrs. Eckels occurred INIarch 7, 1892. She had been a lifelong and faithful 
member of the Presbyterian church, to which James S. Eckels also belonged, and 
in the work of the church both took active and helpful part. 

Spending his youthful days under the parental roof, James H. Eckels devoted 
his time largely to the acquirement of an education in the public schools and was 
graduated from the high school. Although his showing entitled him to enter high 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 95 

school at the remarkably early age of ten, he postponed his entrance till he had 
reached his eleventh year. He had resolved to become a member of the bar and 
in preparation therefor began reading in the office of his father in the firm of 
Eckels & Kyle, of Princeton, Illinois. He afterward entered the Albany (N. Y.) 
Law School, from which he was graduated in 1883. He began practice in Ottawa 
and was successively associated with the firms of Leland & Gilbert; Gilbert & 
Eckels; Duncan, O'Conor & Gilbert; and O'Conor, Duncan & Eckels. No dreary 
novitiate awaited him. He made continuous progress in his practice, being recognized 
by the profession as well as the public as a clear thinker, a logical reasoner and a 
strong and forceful advocate. His analytical mind enabled him to readily determine 
the various points in his case and to give to each its due relative importance. His 
clientage soon became large and of a distinctively representative character and 
while his devotion to his clients' interests was widely recognized, he never forgot 
that he owed a still higher allegiance to the majesty af the law. Mr. Eckels 
never manifested a selfish absorption in his chosen life work to the exclusion of 
active participation in other interests. He read broadly and thought deeply 
concerning significant and vital problems of the age and with the analytical mind 
of the lawyer investigated the important issues which divide the two great political 
parties of the nation. Indorsing party principles, he became a leader of Illinois 
democracy and it was through ]\Ir. Edgar K. Apgar, then a prominent man and a 
power in Ncav York politics that Mr. Eckels met a great many of the most 
prominent men of that time, including Grover Cleveland, with whom he became 
acquainted while in Albany. Mr. Cleveland was charmed with the young democrat 
who showed such excellent knowledge of the political situation in the west and 
could so intelligently discuss the issues of the day. A personal as well as political 
friendship was then formed between them and existed to the time of Mr. Eckels' 
death. During his first administration President Cleveland paid Mr. Eckels the 
compliment of giving into his charge the patronage of his congressional district 
that he might dispose of it as he saw fit, and without his knowledge or solicitation 
President Cleveland appointed Mr. Eckels comptroller of the currency. It is now 
a matter of history that he discharged his duties with signal ability and won a 
brilliant reputation as an official and financier. He inaugurated a new and pro- 
gressive polic}' in connection with the administration of the duties of his office, and 
republicans and democrats alike indorsed his course and spoke of him as the most 
competent man who ever filled the position. When the money question became 
the paramount issue before the country, he addressed many public gatherings upon 
the question of currency and became prominent as an advocate of the gold standard, 
affiliating in 1896 with the national democrats, the gold wing of the democratic 
party. He remained as comptroller of the currency until December 51. 1897, when 
he resigned his office and on the following da\' assumed the duties of the presidency 
of the Commercial National Bank of Chicago. 

From that time until his death Mr. Eckels was a prominent figure in financial 
and business circles of this city and his efforts also extended to other cities as a 
cooperant' factor in the management of many banking institutions. Various business 
enterprises of Chicago sought his aid and, extending his connections, he became 
vice president of the Hewitt Manufacturing Company; treasurer of the Chicago 
Union Traction Company; treasurer of the Featherstone Foundry & Machine 
Company; a trustee of the Chicago Real Estate Trustees; a director of the Allis- 



96 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

Chalmers Company; the American & British Securities Company, Ltd.; the Amer- 
ican Surety Company of New York; the Bankers' Trust of New York; the Oakland 
National Bank; the State Savings Bank of Detroit; and the First National Bank 
of Baltimore, Maryland. He was also a member of the western board of control 
of the Audit Company of New York. ^ 

On the 15th of December, 1887, Mr. Eckels was married to Miss Fannie Lisette 
Reed, of Ottawa, Illinois, a daughter of John F. and Phoebe (Munson) Reed. 
The record of her ancestors is one of close connection with a most interesting 
epoch in the history of northern Illinois. A contemporary historian gives this 
account: "Her mother was a daughter of William and Rachel (Hall) Munson, 
the latter of whom had an eventful history, being in early life, together with her 
sister, taken captive by the Indians in 1832, when the others of the family were 
massacred. It was at the time of the Black Hawk war and the Indian chief after 
the defeat of Stillman on Rock river sent detached parties to attack the frontier 
settlements. As soon as Shabbona was informed of the situation he hastened to 
warn the settlers at the points exposed, reaching the Indian Creek settlement on 
the 15th of May. Mr. Hall started with his family for Ottawa but was persuaded 
by Mr. Davis to stop with him at his home, which was then containing the Hall, 
Davis and Petigrew families and some hired hands. They were attacked by seventy 
or eighty Indians on the afternoon of May 20, 1882. Fifteen were killed and 
Sylvia and Rachel Hall, then aged respectively thirteen and fifteen years, were 
taken captive while the others escaped to Ottawa. The following account of this 
memorable and deplorable event in the pioneer history of La Salle county was 
made by the two captive girls, afterward Mrs. Horn and Mrs. Munson: 'Nemaha 
county, Nebraska, September, 1867. I, John W. Hall, being requested by my 
sisters, Sylvia Horn and Rachel Munson, to state what I recollect of the massacre 
of my father's family and captivity of my two sisters, in May, 1832, most gladly 
comply with their request. The lapse of thirty-five years has made my memory 
rather dim but there are some things, which I will relate, which I remember most 
distinctly and shall as long as I have a being. It was in 1832 and, as near as I 
can recollect, about the 15th or 16th of May, that old Shabbona, chief of the Pot- 
tawottomies, notified my father and others, that the Sac and Fox Indians would 
probably make a raid on the settlement where we lived and murder us and destroy 
our property, and advised him to leave that country for a place of safety. But 
Indian rumors were so common and some of our neighbors did not sufficiently 
credit this old Indian, and we were advised to collect as many together as possible 
and stand our ground and defend ourselves against the Indians. So, after hiding 
all our heavy property and loading the remainder and the family on the wagon, 
we started for Ottawa, meeting 'Sir. Davis, who had been at Ottawa the day before 
and had learned that a company had gone out in a northerly direction to learn 
of the Indian movements and would rejwrt on their return in case of danger. My 
father was prevailed on by Diavis to abandon his retreat and stop at Davis' home, 
where Mr. Petigrew and family, Mr. Howard and son, John H. Henderson and 
two hired men of Davis', Robert Norris and Henry George, were all stopping. 

" 'On the 20th day of May myself and dear father were at work under a shed 
adjoining a blacksmith shop on the west side next to the dwelling house. Mr. 
Davis and Norris were at work in the shop, Henry George and William Davis, 
Jr., were at work on a mill dam, a little south of the shop. It being a very warm 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 97 

day, in the afternoon some one brought a bucket of water from the spring to the 
sho23, and we all went into the shop a few minutes to rest and quench our thirst. 
At this time John H. Henderson, Edward and Greenbury Hall, Howard and son, 
and two of Davis' sons, were in the field on the south side of the creek in full view 
and about a half mile from the house, planting corn and while we were resting in 
the shop we heard a scream at the house. I said : "There are the Indians now," 
and jumped out of the door, it being the opposite side of the house, and the others 
followed as fast as they could and, as we turned the corner of the shop, discovered 
the dooryard full of Indians. I next saw the Indians jerk Mr. Petigrew's child, 
four or five years old, taking it by the feet and dashing its head against a stump. 
I saw Mr. Petigrew and heard two guns seemingly in the house and then the toma- 
hawk soon ended the cries of those in the house, and immediately they fired about 
twenty shots at our party of five but neither of us was hurt that I know of. 

" 'Their next motion was to pour some powder down their guns and drop a bullet 
out of their mouths and raise their guns and fire. This time I heard a short 
sentence of prayer to my right and a little behind. On turning that way I saw 
my dear father on the ground, shot in the left breast and dying and, on looking 
around, I saw the last of the company were gone or were going. The Indians had 
jumped the fence and were making toward me. Mr. Davis was running in a 
northeast direction toward the timber; he looked back and said, "Take care;" he 
had his gun in his hand. 

" *I at this time discovered quite a number of the Indians on horseback, in the 
edge of the woods, as though they were guarding the house to prevent any escape. 
Then it flashed into my mind that I would try to save myself. I think there were 
sixty or eighty Indians. I immediately turned toward the creek, which was fifteen 
or twenty steps from where I stood. The Indians at this time were within a few 
paces of me, with their guns in hand, under full charge. I jumped down the 
bank of the creek, about twelve feet high, which considerably stunned me. At this 
moment the third volley was fired, the balls passing over my head, killing Norris 
and George, who were ahead of me and who had crossed the creek to the opposite 
shore. One fell in the water, the other on the opposite bank. I then passed 
as swiftly as possible down the stream, on the side next the Indians, the bank 
hiding me from their view. I joassed down about two miles, when I crossed and 
started for Ottawa, through the prairie, and overtook Mr. Henderson, who started 
ahead of me, and we Avent together till we got within four miles of Ottawa, where 
we fell in with Mr, Howard and son, three sons of Mr. Davis and my two brothers, 
all of whom were in the field referred to except one of Mr. Davis' sons, who was 
with us in the shop when the alarm was given and who immediately left when he 
heard the cry of Indians. We all went to Ottawa together and gave the alarm. 

" 'During the night we raised a company and with them started in the morning 
for the dreadful scene of slaughter. On the way we met some of Stillman's defeated 
troops, having camped within four miles of where the Indians passed the night after 
they had killed my dear friends. They refused to go back with us and help bury 
the dead but passed on to Ottawa. We went on to the place where the massacre 
took place and, oh, what a sight presented itself ! 

" 'There were some with their hearts cut out and others cut and lacerated in 
too shocking a manner to mention or behold without shuddering. We buried them 
all in great haste, in one grave, without coffins or anything of the kind, there to 



98 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

remain until Gabriel's trump shall call to life tlie sleeping dead. This spot was 
marked in later years by William Munson, who was the husband of Rachel Hall, 
by the erection of an appropriate monument, on which are inscribed the na,mes of 
the victims. 

" 'We then returned to Ottawa and organized a compan}' out of a few citizens 
and Stillman's defeated troops, into which companj' I enlisted, and the next day 
were on the line of march in pursuit of the savages and if possible to get jsosses- 
sion of my two sisters, who were missing and who, we were satisfied, had been carried 
away by the Indians, from signs found on their trail. We went as far as Rock 
river, when our provisions failed and we returned to Ottawa and laid in provisions 
for a second trip. I found that General Atkinson had made propositions to the 
Winnebago Indians, through the agent, Mr. Gratiot, to purchase ray sisters, as 
we were fearful if we approached the Indians they would kill them to prevent their 
capture. We then started the second time and proceeded to Rock river, where we 
fell in with a company of volunteers, under General Dodge, when we learned that 
the friendly Indians had succeeded in obtaining my sisters and that they were at 
White Oak Springs. I went with a company of regulars to Galena and, obtaining 
a furlough, went to White Oak Springs, where I found my sisters and returned with 
them to Galena. \ (Signed) J. W. Hall.' 

"Such was the plain narrative given but no language could describe or convey 
any adequate idea of what the mental suffering of the sisters must have been in 
witnessing the more than tragic death of their family and friends, and of the fearful 
uncertainty that for days hung over their own destiny, held, as they were, help- 
lessly in the power of those whose hands were still red with the blood of their 
kindred. The government and all parties showed a commendable sympath}' to 
rescue the captives and the government paid about two thousand pounds, mostly 
in ponies, for their ransom." The treatment of these captive girls was the most 
kind and their comfort the best that could be provided, a surprising fact in view 
of the exceeding savagery and cruelty of the attack. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Eckels there was born a daughter, Phoebe James, who is 
now the wife of John A. Stevenson, a well known stock and bond broker of Chi- 
cago. The death of Mr. Eckels occurred April 14-, 1907, and he is buried in Grace- 
land cemetery, Chicago. His wife and daughter were at the time in Europe and 
had just been granted an audience by the Pope. The night before his death Mr. 
Eckels had received a letter from his wife explaining the meeting. Of the Fourth 
Presbyterian church Mr. Eckels was an active and prominent member, contribut- 
ing generously to its support and taking an active joart in its upbuilding. He 
belonged to the Chicago, Union League, Commercial and Merchants Clubs but above 
all else he loved his home and found his greatest happiness in the companionship 
of the members of his own household. He was studious by nature, a great reader, 
possessed a remarkably retentive memory and a wonderful personality. At his 
demise Judge Peter S. Grosscup said: "I feel keenly that I have suffered a per- 
sonal loss. My association with Mr. Eckels has been close in recent vears. and 
after I had come to admire him as a man I came to love him as a friend." James 
B. Forgan said: "He was one of the most genial, kindly men I ever knew. He 
always had a good word or a smile for every one and as Comptroller of the currencv 
he had no equal." In its editorial the Tribune wrote: "Mr. Eckels was one of Grover 
Cleveland's closest personal friends and their intimacy continued after their official 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 99 

bond was broken." When JMr. Eckels was called to his final rest President Cleve- 
land said: "I was closely related to Mr. Eckels and his death comes to me with a 
peculiar shock. Neither the immediate community in which he dwelt nor the country 
at large can afford to lose a man like James H. Eckels." 



JOHN O'BRIEN. 



The name of John O'Brien has been a synonym for continuous and well directed 
activity in the field of undertaking since 1877 and he still remains active in the line 
of business to which he has now devoted forty years of his life. He was born in 
Washington, D. C, May 16, 1868, and is a son of Jeremiah and Nora (Galvin) 
O'Brien, both of whom were natives of Ireland, whence they crossed the Atlantic to 
the United States in the early '50s, their marriage being celebrated in the capital 
city of Washington, where the father engaged in the livery business for a number of 
years. At length he determined to seek better and broader business opportunities in 
the west and in September, 1868, came to Chicago, where he established a livery stable 
at the corner of Hill and Market streets. He was there conducting business at the 
time of the great fire of 1871, when his barn was destroyed. He afterward resumed 
business at what was then Nos. 55-57 Washburn avenue, where he carried on the 
livery business, and in 1877 extended the scope of his activities by opening an under- 
taking establishment in connection. He continued at that location for a decade and 
then removed to No. 210 Blue Island avenue, where he continued in the livery and 
undertaking business until his death, which occurred in 1913. 

John O'Brien obtained a public school education and from early boyhood assisted 
his father in the undertaking business, their association of that character continuing 
until 1892, when John O'Brien opened an undertaking business on his own account 
at No. 233 Blue Island avenue. He remained there for a year and then again entered 
into jjartnership with his father, their business relation being maintained until 
December, 1895, when he again opened an independent establishment at Taylor and 
Blue Island avenues. He carried on business at that point from the 16th of Decem- 
ber, 1895, until 1910, when he opened undertaking j^arlors at what was then No. 1661 
West Twelfth street, conducting both an undertaking business and a livery business. 
In 1912 he removed to No. 307 South Kedzie avenue, where he erected a building 
sixty-two and a half by one hundred and twenty-five feet and three stories in height. 
He has in the building six stores and twelve apartments, which he rents. He 
occupies one of the stores and in connection with his undertaking establishment has 
a commodious chapel seating one hundred. He belongs to the Chicago Undertakers 
Association, of which his father was one of the organizers. 

Mr. O'Brien was united in marriage to Miss Hannah Mahoney, of Chicago, who 
passed away on the 16th of January, 1902. In 1906 he was again married, liis 
second union being with Miss Mae Baker, of this city. The children of his first 
marriage were: Mrs. Frances Stanton, of Chicago; and John E., who is a graduate of 
Notre Danie University and of St. Viateur's College. He is likewise a graduate of 
the Worsham School and of the National School of Embalming, in which he com- 
pleted his course in 1917, receiving his state license to practice on the 7th of Novem- 



192540 



100 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

ber of that year. He is now associated with his father in business, making the third 
generation identified with the undertaking business in Chicago. 

Mr. O'Brien is a communicant of Our Lady of Sorrows Cathohc church and he 
is a member of the Knights of Columbus and the Catholic Order of Foresters. He 
is likewise connected with the Knights and Ladies of Honor, with the Royal Arcanum, 
the Knights of The Maccabees, the Knights of the Whip and the National Union. In 
politics he is a democrat and was the candidate for clerk of the municipal court in 
1912. He has been quite active in political circles and does everything in his power 
to promote democratic successes. 



CHARLES FARGO. 



One frequently turns to nature for a simile expressive of the growth of man's 
genius and ability resulting in successful accomplishment. The great river that 
finds its source in the little sjDring, the strong and sturdy tree that sprang from 
the tiny seed, and many other phenomena of nature have been made the meta- 
phorical expression of man's development. Any such would aptly apply to the 
life record of Charles Fargo, who, as a youth of sixteen years, left home to enter 
business life, and when seventeen years of age became connected with the American 
Express Company, which with its forty thousand miles of railroad connection owes 
its extension and substantial growth largely to the efforts, the careful organization 
and the wise direction of its business affairs to Charles Fargo. There was only 
a brief period at the outset of his life when, because of the natural conditions of 
childhood, he had to depend upon others. There was only a very brief period at 
the close of his earthly career when he put aside business cares and rested from the 
labors that had so long engrossed his time and attention. The years of his activity 
were many and the scope of his energy and usefulness most broad. 

The ancestral history of the Fargo family is traced back to sunny Italy, where 
the name is sometimes spelled in the original tongue Fiergo. Rome was the ancient 
family seat although from an early period in the colonization of the new world the 
family has been rejDresented on American soil. His grandfather was a resident 
of Connecticut and it was in that state that his father, William C. Fargo, was born. 
The latter espoused the American cause in the second war Avith England, became 
a corporal in the army and was stationed at Mackinaw, Michigan. Following the 
close of hostilities he became a resident of Onondaga county. New York, and there 
married Miss Tacey Strong. The family was established at Watervale, New York, 
and there Charles Fargo was born, April 15, 1831. The public schools of his native 
town afforded him his educational privileges but the little municipality did not give 
him scope for his budding ambition and business instinct. He sought the larger 
opportunities offered in Buffalo and became a clerk in a book store in that city, 
occupying the position for two years. Then he journeyed further westward to 
become a clerk in the office of the American Express ComjDany at Detroit, Michigan, 
in 1851. From that time until a few years before his death he was connected with 
the company, the constantly developing and extending interests of which had made 
it a corporation, second perhaps only to the mail system of the country. He 
remained at Detroit for fifteen years, his ability winning him recognition in. con- 




CHAELES FARGO 



THE NEW YUUK 

PUBLIC LIBUARY 



ASTiiU, I.rV'V '"'M 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 103 

tinuous promotions through intermediate grades until he was made superintendent 
for the entire state of Michigan. Again promotion came to him in January, 1866, 
when he was transferred to Chicago as successor of liis brother in the office of 
assistant general manager of the northwest division of the American Express Com- 
pany, while his brother, James C. Fargo, went to New York to become general 
manager of all the lines of the company's system. 

Chicago accordingly became Mr. Fargo's home in 1866 and from that date 
xmtil his death he was closely identified with the interests of upbuilding of the 
city. He remained as assistant general manager until 1883, when he became 
general manager of the northwest division, which embraced all of the territory 
west of Buffalo, New York, and the region north and south of the city. Under his 
guidance the development of the American Express Company in the west was 
proportionate to that of the railway extension. He overlooked no opportunity 
to promote the growth of the business, which in its mammoth ramifications came 
to cover over forty-five thousand miles of railway and in the conduct of its inter- 
ests employed more than nine thousand men. Mr. Fargo certainly displaj^ed a 
genius for organization and it is well known that one of the features of his suc- 
cess was his ability to judge of the capacities and powers of men with whom he came 
in contact. He thus surrounded himself with an able corps of assistants and placed 
the management of various departments of the business under competent heads. 
He was made a director of the company in 1875, and in 1882 was chosen the second 
vice president and a member of the executive committee. There is perhaps no more 
perfect organization than that of the American Express Company. Every detail 
of business transacted under this name is recorded in such a manner that it can 
again be easily referred to. Losses in transmission are practically impossible and 
while the actual work of carriers has been continued, Charles Fargo and other men 
at the head have extended the business of the company until it today reaches from 
ocean to ocean. He was one who "found in labor a delight," and the solution of an 
intricate and involved business problem was a matter of genuine pleasure to him. 
He could unravel the most intricate entanglement in regard to business affairs and 
yet so carefully had the business been systematized that a complication of interests 
was scarcely possible. Forceful and resourceful, he stood ready to meet any 
emergency and yet his keen discrimination and wise direction avoided any complexity 
in matters of detailed management. His business ability, however, was by no means 
limited to the interests of the American Express Company, important and extensive 
as they were. He also was one of the directors of the Elgin National Watch Com- 
pany, and this and other business concerns claimed his attention and cooperation and 
profited by his keen discernment and business management. 

In 1851 occurred the marriage of Charles Fargo and Miss Mary J. Bradford, 
a daughter of Harvey Bradford of Cooperstown, Otsego county. New York. They 
became parents of three daughters and a son: Irene, the wife of a Mr. Andrews, 
of Chicago; Livingston Wells Fargo; Adelaide P., the wife of Henry G. Lord, 
of Brookline, Massachusetts; and Florence, now Mrs. Frederick R. Wheeler, of 
Buffalo, New York. The son was graduated from Williams College of Massachusetts 
and after a year spent in travel returned to become his father's assistant in the 
management of the northwest division of the American Express Company. 

Mr. Fargo's interest in citizenship was not perfunctory. While he never 

sought or desired office, he kept well informed on the general questions of the 
Vol. IV— e 



104 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

day and was a stalwart champion of republican principles. He held membership for 
many years in Christ's Reformed Episcopal church and he belonged also to the 
Commercial, Chicago, Calumet and Washington Park Clubs. Death came to him 
October 13, 1900, when he was sixty-nine years of age. His wife had passed away 
in r'ebruary of the previous year, and having traveled life's journey so long 
together, they were sejoarated for but a brief i^eriod in death. One of the local 
papers at his demise, writing of his life work, said: "Within a half century he 
helped to build from a small domestic company of a few thousand miles of rail- 
way a company which today controls fortj^-five thousand miles of service in this 
country alone and has a large European business of approximately one hundred 
and fifty thousand of steamshijo and railway service." His name is indeed written 
large upon the pages not only of Chicago's history but of the western world 
and it was not alone his splendid success that made him one of the dominant 
factors in this city, but his sterling qualities of manhood and citizenship that won 
for him high and imiform regard. His executive force was balanced by an appre- 
ciation for what others accomplished ; his powers of organization did not o'ertop 
the claims of citizenship nor make him unmindful of his obligations to his fellow- 
men whose lines of life were cast in less fortunate places. He recognized the fact 
that life not only offered him advantages in a business way but gave him oj^portunity 
to aid those with whom he came in contact, and he was as quick to appreciate and 
utilize the one as the other. 



MARTIN W. SCHROEDER. 

Martin W. Schroeder is not only well known as a representative undertaker of 
Chicago but is also recognized as an active factor in democratic circles and exerts 
considerable influence over local political thought and action. Moreover, he deserves 
mention in this volume as a representative of one of the oldest Chicago families. He 
was born in this city March 1 i, 1863, and is a son of Frederick and Caroline (Thorny) 
Schroeder, both of whom were natives of Germany who arrived in Chicago in 1848. 
The father was a gardener, following that business for many years. He died in 1894 
and is survived by his widow, who has reached the notable old age of eighty-seven 
years. 

Martin W. Schroeder acquired a j^ublic school education while spending his youth- 
ful days in his parents' home, and after his school days were over he devoted ten 
years to employment in connection with the bakery business. During that period he 
thoroughly acquainted himself with every phase of the business and later established 
a wholesale candy manufactory, which he conducted for fifteen years. He then 
changed the line of his commercial activity in 1904 by the purchase of an interest in 
the undertaking business of his brother, Henry W. Schroeder, who had opened an 
undertaking establishment about 1882 at Archer and Went worth avenues. His 
brother has now retired from connection with the establishment. In 1913 ^Ir. 
Schroeder removed to No. 6115 South Ashland avenue and purchased a building 
twenty-five by sixty-five feet and two stories in height with basement. This was 
outfitted thoroughly for the conduct of an undertaking business, having a chapel with 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 105 

a seating capacity of thirty. Mr. Schroeder is a member of the Chicago Undertakers 
Association and also of the Chicago Motor Livery Men's Association. 

In 1882 Mr. Schroeder was united in marriage to Miss Mary Simon, of Chicago, 
who passed away in 190i. The following year he was married again, his second 
union being with Mary Daniels, of Brighton, Wisconsin, and to them have been 
born two children, Vincent and Martin, both of whom are attending school. By his 
first wife Mr. Schroeder had four children, as follows : Susan, the wife of Harry 
Summer, of Chicago, by whom she has two children; John, who also resides in Chi- 
cago and who is married and has four children ; Gertrude, who is the wife of George 
Maulaff, of Chicago, and has one son; and Carrie, who is at home. 

Mr. Schroeder and his family are members of St. Raphael's Catholic church and 
he belongs to the Knights of Columbus, also to the Royal League and the National 
Union. He is likewise a member of the Mutual Benefit & Aid Society. His political 
endorsement is given to the democratic party and he is interested in the vital 
questions and issues of the day, taking active part in promoting democratic successes 
to the extent of his opportunities. In 1913 he was a candidate for congress on the 
democratic ticket but was defeated. In all matters of citizenship he stands loyally 
for what he believes to be for the best interests of the community and neither fear 
nor favor can swerve him from a course which he believes to be right. 



LEE M. PEDIGO. 



Lee M. Pedigo attacks everything with a contagious enthusiasm that produces 
results. In the course of his active career he has encountered many obstacles and 
difficulties but these he has overcome by persistent purpose and unfaltering determina- 
tion and today he is enjoying a measure of prosperity that is the direct result of 
his efforts. For a number of years he has figured prominently in connection with 
the drug trade of the city. Mr. Pedigo is a native of Kentucky. His birth occurred 
in Barren county, not far from the famous Mammoth cave, on the 8th of August, 
1876, his parents being John H. and Lulu J. (Palmore) Pedigo, representatives of 
old southern families. The father was extensively engaged in dealing in horses and 
mules, which he sold throughout the south. He passed away in the year 1903 but his 
widow still survives. 

Lee M. Pedigo acquired a joublic school education in his native county, attending 
the district school near his father's farm until he reached the age of fourteen years, 
when the famih^ removed to Atlanta, Georgia, where he again entered the public 
schools. He afterward had the benefit of two years' instruction in the Georgia 
Agricultural College and later became a student in the CeceUan College at Eliza- 
betlitown, Kentucky. He turned to professional sport, taking up bicycle racing and 
baseball playing and became a well known figure in athletic circles. In 1898, how- 
ever, he became identified with commercial interests, taking up the work of selling 
sewing machines. He did not find this congenial, however, and he accepted a clerk- 
ship in a driig store in Cincinnati at a wage of three dollars and a half per week. 
He was employed in the one establishment for sixteen months and says that he was 
fired and re-hired at least one hundred and fifty times during that period. It is 
characteristic of Mr. Pedigo, however, that he never gives up. In his vocabulary 



106 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

there is no such word as fail and that his powers were developing is shown in that 
during that period his salary was increased. He came to Chicago in 1?)00, making 
the trip to the city on an excursion train. He arrived a stranger in the town and it 
took him from seven until eleven P. M. to get to the home of his sister. He felt 
that he never rode so far for five cents in his life, but at length he reached his 
objective point and the next morning was ready to start out to conquer new worlds. 
He did not get the position which he had anticipated, but secured employment with 
Dr. Engle at Forty-seventh and Union streets, while subsequently he was employed 
by Herman Schmidt at Forty-fifth street and Wentworth avenue. Feeling that his 
efficiency would greatly be promoted if he could pursue a course in pharmacy, he 
perfected his plans whereby he entered the University of Illinois as a student in 
pharmacy, working his way through the school. He earned money by serving as a 
clerk mornings and evenings in a drug store and his nights were largely devoted to 
study. He continued with Mr. Schmidt for more than two years, or until he was 
graduated with the class of 1902. After he had completed his first year's work in 
the university he met his father in Cincinnati. The father was greatly pleased with 
his son's efforts and the determination which he was showing to gain an education 
and gave him the money for his second year's school work. Following his graduation 
Mr. Pedigo secured a position as manager of the store of Mr. Brancroft at Sixtieth and 
Washington streets. This establishment was afterward sold to Mr. Campbell, of the 
Economical Drug Company, and Mr. Pedigo remained as manager until 190J?, during 
which time he made the store earn twenty-six per cent on its invested capital, but 
after he severed his connection with the business the store lost heavily. In 1903 
Mr. Pedigo's father died, leaving his estate to his wife. However, the son received 
thirteen hundred dollars and borrowed from his mother four thousand dollars more, 
with which to buy the store of W. E. Ponder at the Sheridan Road elevated station. 
He paid five thousand dollars for the establishment, thus having three hundred 
dollars left, and from the first he made a success of the venture. In 1906 he opened 
a second store at the corner of Grace street and Lincoln avenue and in 1908 opened 
a third store at Belmont and Broadway. In 1908 he removed the Sheridan Road 
store to the corner of Sheridan Road and Irving Park boulevard. In 1914 he joined 
Mr. MacLean, of the Central Drug Stores and ;put this store in the chain of stores, 
taking stock in the company. In March, 1915, however, he sold his stock and with- 
drew from the Central Drug Stores. In April, 1916. he purchased the drug store 
at the corner of Clark street and Sunnyside avenue but in the meantime he sold 
his other two stores. He is now concentrating his efforts and attention upon the 
conduct of the one establishment and has one of the finest drug stores on the north 
side. It is neat, tasteful and attractive in arrangement, carries an extensive line of 
drugs and druggists' sundries and the business methods of the house commend it to 
the continued confidence and support of the public. From time to time Mr. Pedigo 
has also made extensive investments in real estate and his holdings in that particular 
are now worth seventy-five thousand dollars. He has likewise built up his business 
until it is upon a splendid paying basis and his entire career indicates him to be a man 
of sound judgment, of keen discrimination and notable sagacity. 

On the 8th of August, 1903, Mr. Pedigo was united in marriage to Miss Lulah 
Jones, of Augusta, Georgia, and to them has been born a daughter, Dorothy Lee. now 
thirteen years of age. Mr. Pedigo belongs to the Royal Arcanum and is identified 
with various trade organizations, having membership in the Chicago Drug Club, the 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS * 107 



/ 



Chicago Retail Druggists Association, and the IlHnois Pharmaceutical Association. 
In the last named he has been chairman of the U. S. P. & N. F. committee and has 
also occupied the same position with the Chicago Retail Druggists Association. He 
is popular and widely known, having an extensive circle of friends in the city. His 
political allegiance is given to the democratic party and when he was a candidate for 
alderman of the twenty-fifth ward in 1912 he polled the highest vote that a democrat 
has ever been accorded in that ward, a fact indicative of his personal popularity and 
the confidence reposed in him. He was active as a campaign speaker at the last 
presidential election, speaking all over Kentucky and in other states. His has been 
a notable career of a self-made man. His name became a familiar one in sporting 
circles during the period of his young manhood. He then started upon his com- 
mercial career empty-handed and there were many hard knocks to be endured as he 
pressed forward along the path to success. Every obstacle in his path, however, has 
seemed to serve as an impetus for renewed effort and concentration on his part and 
with thoroughness he has accomplished everything that he has undertaken. He has 
made himself one of the best informed drug men of the country and has contributed 
largely to druggists' publications, his writings being widely read and largely accepted 
as authority upon the subjects discussed. He has thus come to a position of leader- 
ship through initiative and individual merit. 



EDWARD J. McGEENEY. 

Edward J. McGeeney was for many years a well known undertaker of Chicago 
and a highly respected business man, enjoying the confidence and goodwill of all with 
whom he came in contact. He was born in Ireland in 1857 and departed this life in 
Chicago in 1907, when about fifty years of age. In his childhood he came to the 
United States with his parents, who established their home in Chicago, where he 
acquired a public school education. In young manhood he turned his attention to the 
undertaking business, establishing undertaking parlors about 1872 at No. 355 South 
Halsted street, remaining at that locaiton for about twenty years, and during that 
time he built up a business of large proportions. In 1904 he removed to No. 4300 
West Madison street, where he erected a large building fifty by one hundred and 
seventy-five feet and three stories in height. There he conducted a livery and under- 
taking business, having one of the largest undertaking patronages in Chicago. While 
his building was in process of construction he became ill of pneumonia and passed 
away. Mrs. McGeeney then completed the building and continued the business for 
five years, at the end of which time she sold the equipment, but her son expects to 
continue the business at a later period. The building at the present time is rented 
to Brink's Express Company. 

It was on the 21st of June, 1899, that Mr. McGeeney was united in marriage to 
Mrs. Mary A. Roth, of Chicago a daughter of Patrick Murphy, of Cleveland, Ohio. 
The children of this marriage are : Mary Agnes, now eighteen years of age, at home ; 
nnd Edward J., who is attending high school and is fifteen years of age. The daughter 
is a student in Loretto Academy. The son is planning to take up the undertaking 
business and become his father's successor when he reaches a more advanced age. 
Mrs. McGeeney and her children are communicants of St. Mel's Catholic church. 



108 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

In politics Mr. McGeeney was a democrat and one of the active workers in party 
ranks. Fraternally he was connected with the Eagles and he was a charter member 
of Holy P'amily Court No. 1 of the Catholic Order of Foresters and was identified 
with several other organizations. Mr. McGeeney was widely known, enjoying the 
friendship and kindly regard of many with whom he was brought in contact. He 
was very successful in business, as is shown in the fact that in the course of his 
active career he was able to accumulate enough to erect the building on Madison 
street which his widow still owns and which brings to her a very gratifying rental. 



RICHARD CONOVER LAKE. 

Richard Conover Lake, whom the easily discernible steps in an orderly progres- 
sion have brought to a prominent and enviable position in financial circles in Chi- 
cago, is the son of James and Hannah (Dye) Lake and was born on a farm in 
Montour county, Pennsylvania, July 20, 1846. The public schools of his native 
state afforded him his early educational privileges, which, however, were supjDle- 
mented by private instruction and personal study. Moreover, a receptive mind has 
enabled him to glean valuable lessons from the school of experience and to adajDt 
his knowledge to the demands and needs of the workaday world, wherein his per- 
sistent purpose and intelligent!}' directed energy have achieved success. The first 
position that he filled that gave indication of his ability and proved the open door 
to wider activities Avas with the firm of Fowler & Creveling at Espy, Pennsylvania. 
He continued with that house for several years, after which he changed the base 
of his operations, becoming connected with the firm of Roworth Brothers at Central 
City, Colorado. The recognition of his merit led to his admission to the firm, 
at which time the style was changed to Roworth & Lake. He continued to operate 
there until 1877, when he withdrew from the partnership and removed to Dead- 
wood, South Dakota, where for a short time he was connected with mercantile 
enterprises. Into the field of financial activity, however, he directed his energies, 
becoming president of the First National Bank of Deadwood in 1879. His progress 
in banking circles is indicated by the fact that in 1884 he was elected to the 
presidency of the First National Bank of Rapid City, South Dakota; in 1886 became 
president of the Bank of Chadron in Chadron, Nebraska ; and then in the wider 
field of Chicago's banking circles became known in 1894 as the vice president of the 
Union National Bank. Two years later he was elected to the presidency of the 
Masonic Fraternity Temple Association, but has now retired from all of these 
positions, retaining, however, a financial connection with several of the moneyed 
institutions. Up to within a few years ago he was also largely interested in range 
cattle in Texas and in South Dakota, but also withdrew from that business after 
having met with notable success therein. He now maintains an office at No. 1037 
Marquette building, where he devotes several hours daily to the management of 
his commercial and property investments. He is a member of the board of directors 
of the Commercial National Bank of Chicago, a director of the Diamond Rubber 
Company of Akron, Ohio, and president of the Evanston Public Library. 

While in Central City, Colorado, on the 14th of September, 1871, Mr. Lake 
was married to Miss Mary Randolph, who died September 14, 1894. The children 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 109 

born of that marriage were: Jessie; Amy, now Mrs. Walter G. Pietsch, of Evanston; 
Mary, who died in infancy; Richard Randolph, a member of the firm of John Burn- 
ham & Company, brokers and dealers in investment securities; Margaret; George 
Ernest, who is a graduate of the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, 
1906, and now an attache at the American embassy at Tokio, Japan; James Law- 
rence, who died in childhood; and Gertrude. Having lost his first wife Mr. Lake 
was married in Evanston, on the 9th of February, 1899, to Miss Helen M. Kitchell, 
and their only child, a daughter, Helen, died in infancy. 

The strong qualifications, executive ability and constructive effort which are 
shown in the life of a successful business man naturally lead his fellow citizens 
to seek his service in public capaeities, and to this end the cooperation of Mr. Lake 
has been sought in Evanston, where he has served as a member of the city school 
board, as a director of the Evanston Library and also in other important and 
honorary offices. His political views are in harmony with the principles of the 
republican party and in matters of citizenship he always stands for that which he 
considers best for the municipality and the common good. He is widely known in 
Chicago's leading social organizations, including the Union League Club, the Glen 
View Club, the Evanston Club and the Evanston Country Club, and he makes his 
home in the attractive and aristocratic suburb of Evanston. He belongs to that 
class of men who have laid the foundation for success amid the stable environment 
of the east and have then directed their efforts to the improvement of the limitless 
possibilities offered in the growing west, where as early factors in business develop- 
ment and progress they have been writers of history, leaving their impress in 
unmistakable terms upon the upbuilding of the great western empire. 



LEROY ALBERT GODDARD. 

Leroy Albert Goddard is widely known, not only in Chicago as president of the 
State Bank of Chicago, but also throughout Illinois, because of his earlier activity 
in political circles and his later prominence in Masonic circles. He was born at 
Marion, Illinois, June 22, 1854-, and is a son of James T. and Winifred (Spiller) 
Goddard. Ere the completion of his school days he had devoted several seasons 
to work at various occupations, while attending the public schools in the winter 
months. He was also for one term a student in the Illinois State Normal School 
and in 1875, when twenty-one years of age, started upon an indei3endent business 
career by purchasing a half interest in a small dry-goods store in his native town. 

He met with success in that venture, with which he was connected until 1879, 
when he withdrew from commercial lines to establish himself in business as a 
private banker in Marion. He thus obtained his initial experience in the field of 
labor in which he has since continued. In 1890 he sold his bank, which is now the 
First National Bank of Marion, and organized the First National Bank of Mount 
Carmel, Illinois. He was its president until the 1st of August, 1892, when he 
sought the broader opportunities offered in the city and became cashier of the 
Fort Dearborn National Bank, thus coming into close touch with the financial center 
of the great West. In January, 1903, he was elected president of that institution 
and remained as its head until June, 1908, when he resigned to become vice president 



110 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

of the State Bank of Chicago, of Avhich he was chosen chief executive officer a year 
later. His name has since been closely linked with its active and successful man- 
agement and he is promoting a policy which tends to its still greater growth and 
prominence. 

Mr. Goddard was married in Vincennes, Indiana, November 14, 1888, to Miss 
Anna Bridenthal and resides at No. 5001 Drexel Boulevard. He is ever a welcome 
visitor in the rooms of the Union League and Kenwood Clubs, in which he holds 
membership. He is also a member of the South Shore Country, Midlothian Country, 
and the Bankers' Club of Chicago, of which he is president. He was president of 
the Union League Club in 1908. He is known in Masonic connections throughout 
the state, having for two terms been honored with the position of grand master of 
the grand Masonic lodge of Illinois, while at the present time he is grand treasurer, 
and is also active thirty-third degree for Illinois of the Supreme Council, Northern 
Jurisdiction. 

In the period of early manhood he took helj^ful interest in political affairs and 
enjoyed the distinction of being elected city treasurer of his native town when 
but twentv-one vears of age. Two vears later he was chosen mavor of ^Marion 
and received indorsement of his administration in reelection for a second term of 
two years. Few men of that age have been so honored and his record stands in 
contradistinction to the old adage that a prophet is not without honor save in his. 
own country, for in the city where his boyhood and youth were passed his fellow 
townsmen called him to the highest office within their gift — a direct evidence of 
his popularity and of the confidence reposed in his ability. As the years have gone 
on the exercise of his native powers and talents have brought him to a place of 
prominence. His is the record of a strenuous life — the record of a strong individ- 
uality, sure of itself, stable in purpose, quick in perception, swift in decision, ener- 
getic and persistent in action. He is now president of the Chicago Clearing House 
Association. 



JOHN R. PIERSON. 



Initiative and originality constitute the keynote of John R. Pierson's business 
career. To the suiaerficial thinker it M^ould seem that the undertaking business is 
alike in the methods that any may follow, but Mr. Pierson has shown marked origi- 
nality in designing his own caskets and making designs for his motor cars. His ideas, 
new and original, are strongly artistic and he deserves mention among the most 
prominent representatives of the profession in Chicago. He was born in Sweden 
in 1852 and was sixteen and a half years of age when he bade adieu to friends and 
native land and sailed for the new world. Crossing the Atlantic, he arrived in 
Connecticut, where he resided until ISSi, after which he served for five years in 
the United States armv and was then honorablv discharged in 1889. At the close 
of his military experience he came to Chicago and in 1890 he turned his attention to 
the tailoring business, in which he engaged until 1896. It was in that year that lie 
became established in the undertaking business at Seventy-fifth street and Dobson 
avenue, where he continued for ten years. On the expiration of that period he 
erected his own place at No. 7350 Cottage Grove avenue, where he has a building 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 113 

two stories in height^ with a forty-foot frontage. It is most beautifully and tastefully 
arranged, being different in design from that of any undertaking parlor in the world. 
Every convenience and equipment has been provided and the place gives the idea of a 
quiet home rather than of a place to care for the dead. His own residence is the 
upper floor of the building. 

As previously indicated, Mr. Pierson is most original in his methods. He has his 
owTi way of training assistants and he personally makes the designs for his caskets, 
over one hundred exclusive styles being shown in his stock. These are entirely 
original. He was the first to introduce the Khaki casket, which he put upon the 
market in August, 1917. His motor cars are built after his own design and he calls 
them the "Cunningham Aristocrat." There is only one other like them in the United 
States. Mr. Pierson was the first man in Chicago to place a drain in the center of 
the morgue — a plan of building that is now enforced by law. Mr. Pierson is a 
member of the Chicago Undertakers Association, with which he has been identified 
since starting in business. He has also served as its vice president for two years. 

It was in the year of his removal to Chicago that Mr. Pierson was married to 
Mrs. Ella Mary Graves, of this city, who by her former marriage had a daughter, 
Lottie, who became the wife of Joseph H. Butler, a resident of Chicago, and they 
now have one daughter, Lovilla, who is a student in the Chicago University. 

Mr. Pierson is a republican in his political views, well informed concerning the 
leading questions and issues of the day, but he does not seek nor desire office. 
Fraternally he is connected with Grand Crossing Lodge, No. 776 A. F. & A. M.; 
Grand Crossing Chapter, No. 219, R. A. M. ; and Woodlawn Commandery, K. T. 
He is also a member of Colfax Lodge, No. 198, I. O. O. F. and Amigo Lodge No. 
484, K. P. He has membership in the Chicago Association of Commerce and is 
interested in all that has to do with the welfare and progress of the city and in the 
upholding of those projects and movements which are a matter of civic virtue and civic 
pride. Mr. Pierson has never been a follower to any extent but has always been a 
leader, especially in the line of business in which he has engaged. He thinks out along 
original lines, plans his work in connection therewith and has closely studied every- 
thing bearing upon the sanitary and scientific care of the dead and of funeral 
directing. His work therefore has been most satisfactory and his business has con- 
stantly increased. 



HELGE ALEXANDER HAUGAN. 

Helge Alexander Haugan was numbered among Chicago's bankers who won, 
merited and enjoyed the respect and confidence of his colleagues and contemporaries 
in financial circles. He started out as many another successful man has done with 
but limited advantages, but out of the struggle with small opportunities he came 
finally into the field of broad, active influence and usefulness and no citizen of 
Norway had in larger measure the esteem of his fellow countrymen nor exerted 
a stronger influence among the Norwegians of Chicago in behalf of that which is 
best in manhood and in citizenship. Mr. Haugan was born in Christiania, Norway, 
October 26, 1847, his parents being Helge A. and Anna B. Haugan, who in the 
year 1859 crossed the Atlantic to Montreal, Canada, and the son, then a youth of 



114 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

twelve years, completed his education in the schools of that city, having previously 
mastered the i^reliminar}^ branches of learning in the Norwegian capital. While 
still a resident of Montreal he also learned the steam fitting and brass finishing 
trade. He came to Chicago in 1862 and continued in that occupation as a work- 
ing man, later going into the business for himself. He won a creditable and sub- 
stantial measure of success in that field of labor but later turned his attention to 
financial interests and on the 8th of December, 1879^ with John R. Lindgren as 
partner, entered the banking business under the firm name of Haugan & Lindgren. 
They had modest quarters at Nos. 57-59 La Salle street. Without wealth and 
without experience in banking, but with high hopes and the confidence of early 
manhood, they made arrangements for the conduct of a banking enterprise and 
applied themselves so assiduously to the upbuilding of the business that at the end 
of the first year the deposits of the new bank were thirty-three thousand, eight 
hundred and sixty dollars, and at the close of the second year they were sixty-six 
thousand, five hundred and ninety-seven dollars, having almost doubled within 
the twelve months. A growing clientage comjDclled them to seek larger quarters in 
188t and they secured room in the Marine building at La Salle and Lake streets, 
at the same time increasing their capital stock to one hundred thousand dollars. 
At that time they were joined by Mr. Haugan's brother, H. G. Haugan, of Mil- 
waukee, who was then land commissioner of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul 
Railway and who became a partner in the banking enterprise. The growth of the 
business was continuous. In 1885 their deposits were two hundred and forty-two 
thousand, five hundred and ten dollars, and in 1887 three hundred and forty-six 
thousand, five hundred and eleven dollars. Early in 1891 the bank was chartered 
as a state bank with a paid up capital of five hundred thousand dollars and 
deposits of one million, eighty-eight thousand, six hundred and fifty-seven dollars. 
The name adopted was the State Bank of Chicago, of which Mr. Haugan was 
elected president and Mr. Lindgren cashier, and on the first board of directors, 
in addition to the two officials, were Henry C. Durand, John H. Dwight, Theodore 
Freeman, Charles L. Hutchinson, A. P. Johnson, A. Jurgens, J. M. Larimer, Thomas 
Murdoch and P. S. Peterson. The fact that these men, all prominent in the busi- 
ness circles of the city, gave their support to the new institution is an indication 
of the confidence felt in the business ability and integrity of the man who stood 
at its head. In 1897 the bank was removed to its present quarters in the Chamber 
of Commerce building, and under the guidance of Mr. Haugan its development has 
been both rapid and substantial. On the 1st of January, 1909, the cajjital, surplus 
and profits amounted to two million, three hundred and fourteen thousand, three 
hundred and sixty-one dollars, and the total deposits to nineteen million, eighty- 
eight thousand, seventy-six dollars. He continued at the head of the institution 
until his death, in 1909. He enjoyed in fullest measure the good will and trust of 
colleagues and contemporaries and his name is inscribed on the roll of Chicago's 
honored business men. He was also vice president of the Clearing House Associa- 
tion and a director of the Chicago Title & Trust Company. He was also treasurer 
of the University of Illinois and was president of the Bankers Club of Chicago. 
He served on the board of education with Mayor Swift and at one time was treasurer 
of the Lincoln Park board. 

In 1868 Mr. Haugan was united in marriage to Miss Laura Wardrum, and to 
them were born four sons and two daughters, the sons being Oscar H., Henrv A., 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 115 

Charles M. and J. Richard. The first three are connected with the State Bank of 
Chicago. One daughter became the wife of Judge Axel Chytraus and the other 
is the wife of Dr. Wallace S. Grosvenor, both of Chicago. Mr. Haugan was one 
of the most prominent representatives of the Norwegian population of Chicago. 
F. Herman Gade, the former Norwegian consul here, said: "In Chicago he prob- 
ably was closer to all natives of Norway than any other man and he kept in touch 
with them." Perhaps no better estimate of his life and character can be given 
than in the words of those who knew him well in connection with banking interests 
of this city. David R. Forgan, president of the National City Bank, said: "The 
news of Mr. Haugan's death is a shock to me. He was one of the standard men 
of Chicago, of the highest integrity and character. His death means a severe loss 
to the banking interests of the city." John J. Mitchell, of the Illinois Trust 
& Savings Bank, expressed himself as follows : "He was one of the most con- 
servative bankers in Chicago and had been in the business many years. He always 
was well looked upon. He will be greatly missed in banking circles. No man in 
Swedish and Norwegian circles of Chicago was held in higher esteem than he. He 
was a fine man, quiet and retiring in disposition and of excellent judgment. All 
the bankers admired him." Another said: "He was modest, quiet and a very able 
banker, a man of excellent business qualifications and a good friend." Those who 
knew Mr. Haugan remember well his unostentatious manner and his genuine worth 
never failed to impress those with whom he came in contact. Throughout his 
entire business career his actions measured up to the highest requirements of 
commercial and business integrity and as well to the highest standards of manhood 
and citizenship. 



JOHN P. MUELLER. 



John P. Mueller is well established in the undertaking business in Chicago with 
a well deserved reputation that has brought to him a liberal patronage. He was 
born in Chicago, August 7, 1876, and is a son of Mathies and Josephine (Klinge) 
Mueller, the latter a daughter of Charles Klinge, who settled in Chicago at a very 
early day and was the owner of a farm at what is now Division and Clark streets, 
today one of the thickly populated sections of the city. This, however, he traded 
for land west of Evanston. His daughter Josephine was born in Chicago. Mathies 
Mueller was born on the other side of the Atlantic but in young manhood became 
a resident of Chicago, where he engaged in the butchering business for a time but 
later gave his attention to the livery business. 

Their son, John P. Mueller, whose name introduces this review, acquired a public 
school education and started out in the business world as an employe in a bakery. 
He was afterward employed in a laundry and in 1897 he became connected with the 
undertaking business, in which he has since been engaged, entering into partnership 
relations- under the firm style of Berwick & Mueller at No. 421 South California 
avenue. After eight months, however, the partnership was discontinued and Mr. 
Mueller entered the employ of Henry Ludolph. Upon the death of his employer five 
years later Mr. Mueller became a partner in the ownership of the business under 
the firm style of Ludolph & Mueller. They conducted their interests at No. 1223 



116 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

Milwaukee avenue and in 1910 Mr. Mueller purchased the interest of Mr. Ludolph's 
widow in the business and discontinued the establishment at No. 1223 Milwaukee ave- 
nue, removing his business to No. 2341 Milwaukee avenue. In fact a branch establish- 
ment of the original plant had been conducted there from 1904 and a fine new build- 
ing was erected two stories in heiglit and twenty-five by ninety feet. It contains a well 
appointed chapel with a seating capacity of one hundred. Mr. Mueller carries a large 
and carefully selected line of caskets and undertakers' goods and is equij^ped to give 
the most satisfactory service in funeral directing. He also has auto equipment and is 
successfully carrying on a business which is one of the oldest established undertaking 
houses of the city. The business was begun in 1871 by a Mr. Stiebeiner at Division 
street and Milwaukee avenue and eventually passed into possession of Mr. Ludolph, 
who, as stated, conducted it until his death, at which time Mr. Mueller became a 
partner in the firm and eventually sole proprietor. He is a member of the Chicago 
Undertakers Association and also of the Chicago Motor Liverymen's Association. 

On the 15th of April, 1913, Mr. Mueller was united in marriage to Miss Susanna 
Cari>enter, of Chicago. He is jarominently known in lodge circles, holding member- 
ship in D. C. Cregier Lodge, No. 64^3, A. F. & A. M.; Lincoln Park Chapter, No. 
177, R. A. M.; Humboldt Park Commandery, No. 79, K. T.; and Medinah Temple 
of tlie Mystic Shrine. He likewise belongs to Triangle Lodge, No. 690, K. P.; to 
Goethe Lodge, No. 329, I. O. O. F. ; and to Humboldt Encampment, No, 101, 
I. O. O. F. He is connected with Richard Yates Council of the Royal Arcanum and 
he has membership in the First English church (Evangelical Lutheran,). In politics 
he is independent, voting for men and measures rather than for party, yet he is not 
remiss in the duties of citizenship and stands loyally for all that he believes to be 
for the best interests of the community. Laudable ambition has prompted his activity 
in business circles and thoroughness, reliability and enterprise have enabled him to 
steadily work his way upward. 



GERHARDT F. MEYNE. 



Gerhardt F. Meyne is a Chicagoan who has achieved an enviable reputation as 
a master builder since his entrance into his present field of work in 1909, when, 
associating with F. W. Walther he formed a copartnership under the name of Walther 
& Meyne. Since 1911, when the firm was dissolved, Mr. Meyne has been engaged 
continuously in business alone, his constructive ability being reflected in a large 
number of well known structures in Chicago and surrounding territory. 

Born at Chicago, December 30, 1880, he is the son of William Meyne who came 
from Hanover in 1863 and from that time until his retirement thirty years ago, 
successfully operated as a builder on the northwest side of the city, a large number 
of the domiciles and business houses along Milwaukee avenue being his handiwork. 
He was also active in real estate enterprises and contributed materially to the 
development of that section in the early days, being prominently identified with the 
builders' exchanges and business organizations of his day. His wife was Wilhelmina 
Heinrichs, also a native of Hanover and who died in 1905. 

Gerhardt F, Meyne received his academic education in the German Lutheran 
I^arochial schools and was technically trained in the old Columbia Trade School. At 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 117 

the age of sixteen years he was apprenticed as a carpenter and at twenty-five had 
qualified as a superintendent of general building construction. His success may be 
largely traced to his father's plan of placing him under strange masters where 
efficiency and zeal were demanded as the price of progress. He continued as superin- 
tendent of construction until 1909 when he engaged in the business of contracting on 
his own account. 

Among the notable examples of his work are the reconstruction of the Republic 
and the Tribune buildings, the Annex building of Marshall Field & Company, the 
Portland block, the construction of the Pierce-Arrow assembly plant, the plant of 
the Excelsior Steel Furnace Company, the plant of the Viviana Brothers' manufactur- 
ing company at Indianapolis and the Amusement Pavilion of the West Baden Mineral 
Springs Company at West Baden, Indiana. 

During the past three years Mr. Meyne has been in charge of the erection of the 
Municipal Christmas Tree, which has been copied in several large cities. He has 
also been interested in the promotion of other great public entertainments tending to 
I^romote higher civic standards, his efforts in this direction having been far reaching 
and beneficial. 

Mr. Meyne married Elizabeth Ernst at Buffalo, New York, February 7, 1911. 
She is the daughter of Henry M. Ernst of Olean, New York. They reside at 602 
North Rush street. Mr. Meyne is a Lutheran in religion and a republican in politics, 
a life member of the Art Institute and the Chicago Historical Society. Among the 
organizations with which he is identified as a member are the Building Association, 
the Chicago Building Construction Employers Association, the Chicago Masons & 
Builders Association, the Chicago Carpenter Contractors Association, the Chicago 
Builders Club, the Executives Club of Chicago, the Chicago Association of Commerce, 
the Rotary Club of Chicago, the Union League and the Hamilton Clubs. 



FRANK B. ORR. 



In the year 1872, Frank B. Orr became identified with the commercial interests 
of Chicago, and through the intervening years to the time of his death made con- 
tinuous progress, being recognized for a long period as the most prominent repre- 
sentative of the hardware and cutlery trade in the city. His business methods 
commended him to the confidence and good-will of all, and his determination enabled 
him to overcome the difficulties and obstacles which are continually to be met with 
in the conduct of important business affairs. 

Mr. Orr was born in Mishawaka, Indiana, on the 25th of February, 1843, and 
his life record covers the intervening years to the 28th of November, 1906. His 
parents were John B., and Louise (Taylor) Orr, of Mishawaka, where his father 
was engaged in the foundry business. The son pursued his education in the public 
schools of that place, and was afterward graduated from De Pauw University of 
Indiana. His initial experience in the hardware trade came to him as an employe 
of George Worthington & Company, of Cleveland, Ohio. In 1863 he went to^ 
Mansfield, Ohio, and at the age of twenty-three years entered upon an independent 
business career as a hardware merchant, conducting a store in Mansfield until 1872. 
A studv of business conditions there and elsewhere led him to the belief that he 



118 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

might have better opportunities in Chicago, where he arrived in March, organizing 
the firm of Orr & Lockett. This was continued under partnership relations for about 
eighteen years, and in January, 1890, was incorporated as the Orr & Lockett Hard- 
ware Company, with Mr. Orr as president. They conducted a retail and manu- 
facturing business in hardware, cutlery and tools, and the enterprise became not only 
one of the most extensive establishments of this character in Chicago, but also set 
the standard which others followed. The name became a synonym for reliable deal- 
ing and a guarantee of the excellence of the stock which they handled. Mr. Orr con- 
tinued in active business until his death, and through his persistent and unfailing 
energy built the business up to its present high standard. He was a hard-working, 
conscientious business man, successful in all that he undertook, his determination and 
diligence enabling him to overcome all obstacles and difficulties which barred his 
path. 

On the 10th of June, 1888, Mr. Orr was united in marriage to Miss Lucy J. Doe, 
a daughter of Moses C, and Dorothy (Wingate) Doe. The Doe family were early 
residents of New Hampshire, and the father there engaged in the woolen business. 
The mother was a descendant of John Wingate, one of the founders of Harvard 
College, and a man prominent in the colonial life of New England. Several of the 
ancestors of Mrs. Orr were soldiers of the Revolutionary war. 

Mr. Orr's loyal devotion to his friends was ever one of his salient characteristics. 
His social qualities, unfailing courtesy, and sincerity of manner and speech made 
him popular with his friends, who were as numerous as his acquaintances. He de- 
lighted in outdoor sports and belonged to several hunting and fishing clubs. He 
enjoyed all different phases of life in the open and was a great traveler and lover 
of nature. His political allegiance was given to the republican party, but he 
was conservative in his views concerning the public policy. He held membership 
with the Central church, and was a warm admirer of Dr. Gunsaulus. He was 
also a member of the Union League, the Homewood Country Club, the Indiana 
Club, and the Twentieth Century Club. He possessed a cheerful joyous nature 
that made him ever a welcome guest among his friends and business associates. 
His entire life was characterized by steady progress that bespoke the excellent 
use which he made of his opportunities. At any one point in his career he seemed 
to have accomplished the utmost possibility for accomplishment at that point. He 
was a man of broad and liberal thought as regarded all questions of public interest 
and vital importance and he never looked at life from any narrow or contracted 
standpoint. He left the impress of his individuality in many ways upon the history 
of Chicago, and on the roll of its valued citizens his name is deeply inscribed. 



WILLIAM EDW^ARD HARPER, D. D. S. 



/ 



In nineteen years of continuous connection with the dental fraternity Dr. 
William E. Harper has gained distinction as an educator, practitioner and inventor, 
his efforts in all these directions constituting a valuable contribution to the work 
of the profession. He was born February 12, 1865, in Doncaster, Yorkshire, Eng- 
land, a son of John and Hannah (BoA'd) Harper. He pursued his education in 
the public schools of Crewe Cheshire, England, where he completed a course in 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 119 

1878, and in the same place attended the Mechanics' Institute, from which he was 
graduated with the class of 1880. His professional training was received in the 
Northwestern University Dental School of Chicago, from which he was graduated 
with the D. D. S. degree in 1891. In the meantime he had had some practical 
experience in business lines, having served an apprenticeship in the mechanical 
engineering department of the London & Northwestern Railway before coming to 
America. He possesses notable mechanical skill and ingenuity and readily recogniz- 
ing lack and needs along specific lines in which he was working he set to work to 
meet such needs and in 1885 invented the Harper wire-stitching machine, now 
manufactured by F. Martini & Company, of Frauenfeld, Switzerland. The year 
1880 witnessed his arrival in the United States and following the completion of 
his dental course in 1891 he entered upon the active practice. He had been an 
apt student so that his equipment was good, and there came to him the recognition 
of his ability in the profession when, in 1893, he was elected professor of operative 
technic in the American College of Dental Surgery. Two years later he was elected 
professor of operative technic in the Northwestern University Dental School and 
in 1898 was chosen assistant professor of operative dentistry in the same institu- 
tion. It was also in that year that he was elected an honorary member of the 
Wisconsin State Dental Society and the Odontological Society of Western Pennsyl- 
vania, thus there coming to him public recognition of the high standing which he 
had won. In 1900 he was elected secretary and business manager of the North- 
western University Dental School. Again calling forth his inventive genius to 
meet the needs of the profession, in 1902 and 1903 he invented the Harper contra- 
angle handpiece and cabinet, the Harper holder and cleavers together with other 
specialties. In 1904', however, he resigned all professorships and business manage- 
ment in order to devote all of his time to the practice of his profession together 
with the manufacture of his dental appliances and dental alloy. His contributions 
to the profession are of great value, while his ability in operative dentistry has 
won for him an extensive and growing practice, which ranks him with the most 
eminent members of the profession. 

In 1895, in Chicago, Dr. Harper was married to Miss Clara Garrison, a daughter 
of David and Catharine Garrison, and their children are Clarence Edward, Dorothy 
and Louise Harper. In his political views Dr. Harper is a republican, manifesting 
a citizen's interest in the situations of the day without ambition for office. He 
belongs to the Psi Omega, is a life member of the Press Club of Chicago and is a 
member of the Chicago plan commission, appointed in 1909. He is a member of the 
South Shore Country Club. He takes deep and abiding interest in the welfare of 
the city and holds advanced views on many questions of municipal policy, while 
his efforts are of practical value in all lines to which he has directed his activities. 



N. H. HULTIN. 



N. H, Hultin, one of the prominent and enterprising citizens of Chicago, identified 
with many important public projects which have had to do with the welfare, upbuild- 
ing and development of the city, was born in Sweden, September 4, 1869, a son of 
Peter A. and Anna C. Hultin, who arrived in Chicago in 1872. The father was a 



120 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

sailor and followed the lakes for a number of years, but both he and his wife have 
now passed away. 

Their son, N. H. Hultin, pursued his education in the public schools and started 
in the business world as a clothing cutter. He has been identified with the undertak- 
ing business since 1891, in which year he entered into partnership with G. Segersten. 
That connection was continued for ten years and in 1901 Mr. Hultin established 
business on his own account at No. 3176 North Clark street, where he occupies a 
substantial building with a frontage of twenty-five feet. His chapel has a seating 
capacity of one hundred. The building is two stories in height and is well equipped 
according to the latest and most advanced ideas concerning the sanitary care of the 
dead. His tact, thoughtfulness and kindness make him a valued factor in the work 
of funeral directing and the integrity of his business methods has gained for him a 
very substantial measure of success. 

On the 28th of June, 1899, Mr. Hultin was united in marriage to Ella Nelson, 
of Chicago. He is well known as a representative of the Masonic fraternity, belong- 
ing to King Oscar Lodge, No. 855, F. & A. M.; to Lincoln Park Chapter, No. 87, 
R. A. M.; Lincoln Park Commandery, K. T.; and to Medinah Temple, A. A. O. N. 
M. S. He is also a re^Dresentative of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the 
Knights of Pythias and the National LTnion, and he has memberships in various Swe- 
dish organizations. His religious faith is indicated in his connection with the Lutheran 
Trinity cluirch and his political belief finds evidence in the stalwart support which he 
gives to the republican i^arty. He served as supervisor of the town of Lakeview in 
1896 and 1897 and he has been an active party worker and loyal advocate of many 
measures for the public good, as is demonstrated by his connection with the Clark 
Street Business Men's Association and the Lakeview Business Men's Association. 
He is a member of the Chicago Plan Commission and is putting forth every possible 
effort to aid in the improvement and development of the city according to the Chicago 
-Plan, which was largely designed by the late Mr. Bumham, recognized as the fore- 
most city builder of the world. Mr. Hultin believes that the i^ossibilities for making 
Chicago the most beautiful city are limitless and is working most earnestly to pro- 
duce the desired result. 



JUDGE JOSEPH E. GARY. 

When the history of Chicago and her public men shall have been written, its 
pages will bear no more illustrious name and record no more distinguished career 
than that of Judge Joseph E. Gary. If "Biography is the home aspect of history," 
as Wilmott has expressed it, it is certainly within the province of true history to 
commemorate the lives of those men whose careers have been of signal usefulness 
and honor to the state, and in this connection it is not only compatible but absolutely 
imperative that mention be made of Judge Gary, one of the most able and learned 
members of the Illinois bar, to whom was accorded an honor conferred ujion no 
other man of the nation — the honor of forty-three years of continuous service ujjon 
the bench. 

The life record of Judge Gary h.ad its beginning in Potsdam, New York, on the 
9th of July, 1821. The family of which he was a representative was founded in 




JOSEPH E. GARY 



TJIE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC. LIBRARY 



ASTOR. LENOX avd 
TILDL.V FOi:.NIiAT .\,s 
K 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 123 

New England in early colonial days. There lived his grandfather, Seth Gary, who 
was the father of Eli Bush Gary. The latter married Frances Orilla Easton, also of 
Puritan extraction. They were residents of Potsdam, New York, at the time of the 
birth of their son, Joseph E., who acquired his literary education in the common 
schools of his native place, and in an academy in that state. The opportunities of 
the middle west attracted him and in IS^S, when about twenty-two years of age, he 
went to St. Louis, where he pursued the study of law and was admitted to the 
bar in 184.4. Seeking a favorable location, his attention was called to Springfield, 
then the principal town in southeastern Missouri, and also the location of the United 
States land office. He entered upon his professional career there and was making 
headway in his chosen calling when his interest was aroused in the newly acquired 
territories secured through the war with Mexico. Over the old Santa Fe trail he 
traveled to New Mexico and in a district where civilization was but in its embry- 
onic state he resumed practice, settling at Las Vegas. The majority of the natives 
spoke only the Spanish language but Mr. Gary at once began studying that tongue 
which he soon learned to speak and write so as to make i:)ractical use of it in his 
professional business in that territory. It is related that on one occasion he 
defended a Mexican accused of murder. The evidence against his client was strong 
and he was convicted. Judge Gary, however, asked for an appeal to the supreme 
court with time in which to present a bill of exception. These requests were 
promptly granted by the judge who then added: "Mr. Gary, the supreme court sits 
in October; there will be no stay of proceedings and your client will be hung in 
September," all of which took place as the judge said it would. The work of the 
courts of New Mexico was then scarcely large enough to support many lawyers and 
Judge Gary availed himself of an opportunity to add to his financial resources by 
assisting in driving a herd of sheep to the Pacific coast, and on foot he traversed 
the many weary miles between New Mexico and San Diego. At the latter place he 
boarded a steamer bound for San Francisco, where he engaged in the practice of law 
for three years. The jjicture of life in San Francisco at that time is a familiar one 
to students of history. It was the Mecca of the gold hunter who had been success- 
ful in his search for the precious metal and found here opportunity for the riotous 
joy which is ever a feature of a new community. The glittering bars, music halls 
and gambling hells had no attraction for the young lawyer from New York, how- 
ever, and when not occupied in the preparation of a trial or case, he gave his time 
to study, storing his mind with legal principles and precedents from which he drew 
at will in his later career as a jurist. But a yearning to see the old home in New 
York, to meet again the friends of his youth, led him to sever his connection with 
the far west and from San Francisco he returned to Potsdam. Later he proceeded 
to the middle west and in Berlin, Wisconsin, formed the acquaintance of Miss Ebza- 
beth Swetting. whom he wedded on the 28th of November, 1855. She is a daughter 
of Judge John and Mary (Sessions) Swetting, natives of Clinton, New York, and 
Vermont respectively. Both are of English descent and now make their home 
near Boston, Massachusetts. 

The year following his marriage Judge Gary established his home in Chicago 
and almost from the beginning of his connection with the bar of this city he was 
accorded prominence in its ranks. While in New Mexico he had formed the 
acquaintance of Murray F. Tuley, with whom he practiced law for two years after 
his arrival in Chicago. During the succeeding three years he was a partner of 

ToL IV— 7 



124 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

Evert and James Vanburen, bait was called from the private iDractice of law to the 
bench of the sujaerior court of Cook county in 1863. He sat upon that bench for 
forty-three years, a record unparalleled in the history of the courts of the United 
States, if not in the world. Again and again he was elected to the office. The 
people of Chicago would almost as quickly have said that the court should have no 
existence as that Judge Gary should not occupy its bench. There is no man in the 
judicial history of Illinois in whom the people have placed such implicit confidence 
in his professional integrity and ability. He was noted for his great discharge of 
business and for the rapidity of his decisions. These, however, were the result of 
a most careful consideration of the facts and the law applicable to them. The 
rapidity with which he disposed of law business was the result of his comprehensive 
understanding of legal principles. It was not necessar\^ for him to refer to the 
numerous law volumes but only to call upon his retentive memory which as the 
years passed was made the storehouse of a most broad and profound legal learning. 
He never for a moment forgot the dignity of his position nor the high purpose 
of the courts. He felt that lawyers had no right to indudge in long and prosaic dis- 
sertations or to employ rhetoric or oratory in an attempt to enshroud the real cause 
at issue. In dealing with such he made them confine their efforts to the points before 
the court, having a very incisive way of getting at the gist of the matter to be 
decided. He permitted no wandering but held the older as well as the younger 
members of the bar strictly to the points in question. But humor, however, was not 
an unknown feature in the court room, for he loved a keen encounter of wit, but 
nothing was allowed to detract from the real work to be performed there. His 
administration of justice was entirely satisfactory to the community without respect 
to political opinion. On four occasions of his reelection he received the nomination 
of both political parties, a fact which indicates that he had inspired general con- 
fidence by an unimpeachable personal character as well as by marked professional 
skill. In November, 1888, he was transferred by appointment of the supreme court 
of the state to the appellate court of the first district of Illinois and became its 
chief justice. 

While his experience as a lawyer and jurist covered a wide field, that which 
brought Judge Gary most jDrominently before the public was the trial of the 
anarchists in Chicago in 1886. Perhaps no other case ever tried in America's courts 
attracted such widespread attention, owing to the fact that it involved problems and 
interests that were and still are before the people. A dynamite bomb was thrown 
into the midst of a battalion of police and of the sixty-seven men injured seven died. 
Eight men were tried for complicity in the offense. There was no certainty as to 
the identity of the thrower of the bomb, and reliance must therefore be placed on 
the statute which makes the accessory guilty of the crime of the {principal. The 
indictment was one of the most voluminous ever returned in a murder case. The 
evidence was directed to prove conspiracy whereof the killing was the overt act. 
The bomb was thrown March 4, 1886, and the trial began on the 7th of June,, 
twenty-one days being spent in impaneling the jury, while nine hundred and eighty- 
two men were examined before the twelve were selected. The trial lasted sixty- 
two days, the prosecution examining one hundred and forty-three witnesses and the 
defense seventy-nine. All this examination necessarily gave rise to numberless 
objections and exceptions, each requiring prompt decision by the court and each 
decision being made with the consciousness that it was subject to revision bv the 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 125 

supreme court and refusal in case it should be found erroneous and injurious to 
the accused, for the prosecution could not have a new trial in any case. When 
seven of the accused were found guilty the case was at once carried to the supreme 
court where Justice Magruder pronounced the entire trial free from fatal or ma- 
terial errors. 

Judge Gary in pronouncing sentence gave evidence of some of his most strongly 
marked characteristics — his kindness of heart, his firm and upright mind, and his 
sterling, clear-sighted view of common law and common sense. In speaking of 
the lawlessness sometimes displayed by "organized labor" he said: "What I shall 
say will be said in the faint hope that a few words from a place where the people 
of the state of Illinois have delegated the authority to declare the penalty for a 
violation of their laws, and spoken upon an occasion so solemn and awful as this, 
may come to the knowledge of and be heeded by the ignorant, deluded and mis- 
guided men who have listened to your counsel and followed your advice. I say in 
the faint hope, for if men are persuaded that because of business differences, whether 
about labor or anything else, they may destroy property and assault and beat otlier 
men, and kill the police, if they, in the discharge of their duty, interfere to pre- 
serve the peace, there is little ground of hope that they will listen to any warn- 
ing. Not the least among the hardships of the peaceable, frugal and laborious 
poor it is to endure the tyranny of mobs who, with lawless force, dictate to them 
under penalty of peril to limb and life where, when and upon what terms they may 
earn a livelihood for themselves and their families. Any government that is worthy 
of the name will strenuously endeavor to secure their lawful avocations and safety 
for their property and persons while obeying the law." 

All this was followed by a phase of the case which by no means pleased Judge 
Gary. He received hundreds of commendator}' and congratulatory letters in which 
there seemed to be an element of approval of a courageous course. It was not what 
Judge Gary wanted. His position, as he claimed and as every thinking man must 
realize, was not that of a hero taking an initiative step in the face of danger; he 
was simply the judge administering the law without partiality, basing his address 
to the jury upon the facts of the case and the law applicable to them. Judge Gary 
felt so deeply upon this subject that in an article in the Century Magazine of April, 
1893, he explained the points of law involved in the case in a vigorous and in- 
cisive manner. "Mixed with all the approval of my own part in the conviction of 
the anarchists that has come to my eyes and ears," he saj's, "the amount of which 
is be^^ond my summing up, there has been an undertone, like a minor strain in music, 
that the anarchists deserved their fate; that society has the right to enforce the 
first law of nature — self-preservation ; and, therefore, if I had a little strained the 
law, or administered it with great rigor against them, I was to be commended for 
my courage in so doing. I protest against any such commendation and deny utterly 
that I have done anything that should subject me to it." He therefore applies him- 
self to show that the verdict of the jury was right, that they were not the victims 
of prejudice, not martyrs for free speech, but in morals as well as in law were guilty 
of murder. A.nother motive of his paper is to show the laboring people, of whom 
the anarchists claimed to be the especial friends, that that claim was a sham and a 
pretense, adopted only as a means to bring manual laborers into their ranks, 
and that counsel and advice of the anarchists, if followed by the workingmen, would 
expose them to the danger of becoming, in law, murderers. "Brought up myself to 



126 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILD.ERS 

manual labor," says Judge Gary, "it never ceases to seem strange to me that there 
are not virtue and strength enough vested anywhere to protect from mob violence 
and assault a humble, peaceable citizen, obedient to all law and blameless in his 
life, in his efforts to earn for himself and those dependent upon him a livelihood 
by honest industry; or if he be wi-onged through a loophole in that protection, to 
avenge his wrongs. I spent the summer of 1840 at a carpenter's bench by day and 
singing campaign songs by night, though not yet a voter, and I think now that I 
would as readily have fought for the right to do the one as the other. Hopeless 
as it may be to write the warning, yet it should be made so clear that nobody could 
be ignorant that the law is, that if men enter into a combination which contemplates 
for the success of its purpose and the exercise of unlawful force against the property 
or the persons of other men, and killing is done by any of the men in the combination, 
in pursuance of the plan upon which, and in effecting the purpose for which the 
combination was formed, then murder by the hand of one is murder by all. ' After 
a thorough and exhaustive review of the evidence. Judge Gary reiterates the con- 
clusion that "in law and in morals the anarchists were rightly punished, not for 
opinions, but for horrible deeds." 

In Waterman's history of Chicago in a sketch of Judge Gary appears the fol- 
lowing: "He had a vigorous mind that seemed never to need rest or to be dull. 
His memory was phenomenal. He know, not dimly or hazily, but with substantial 
accuracy what the supreme and appellate courts had held upon every question pre- 
sented to them ; and he knew also where to find the decision he wished to call at- 
tention to. In his judicial office he was utterly indifferent to the applause of the 
multitude, the blandishments of power, as well as the bitterness of those who took 
offense at his conduct. He was devoted to his family, loved his friends and hated 
no one. He brought sunshine into every room he entered and carried good cheer 
wherever he went. He was a delightful working companion ; fought fairly and 
good-naturedly for his view and helped those who differed with him to find author- 
ities for the conclusions they held. He recognized that the fundamental distinction 
between free government and despotism is that the former is a government b}t 
law and the latter by men; that in a free government all, high and low, poor and 
rich, are not only equal before the law hot it is to be equally and impartially ad- 
ministered to all, and that the downfall of liberty begins with a denial of the pro- 
tection of the law to a despised or feeble few. For more than forty years he sat as 
a judge, ever endeavoring, not to win favor, fame, applause or renown, but to apply 
the law to the facts presented to him. The judgments he rendered were not of his 
choosing; they were such as in his view the law pronounced. As a judge he en- 
deavored, not to make, but to declare and apply the law. He understood that in 
free governments the function of executive and judicial departments is to act under, 
be servient to, apply and obey the law; that in this blessed land, law reigns and 
rules over all." 

Those who met Judge Gary in home and social relations found him a most genial 
and companionable gentleman, duly appreciative of the wortli of others. Unto him 
and his wife were born three daughters, Mary Louise, Fannie Elizabeth and Char- 
lotte Blanche. All are now married, the eldest daughter having become the wife 
of James W. Sheahan, of Winnetka. Fannie, tlie second in order of birth, wedded 
Dr. Hugh T. Patrick, a practicing physician of Chicago, and Cliarlotte is now the 
wife of Dr. A. T. Barnum, of Toledo. They also lost two children. 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 127 

Judge Gary's manner in private life was one of entire simplicity in which os- 
tentation and display had no part. He hated sham and pretence, admired true 
worth and held integrity as one of the crowning virtues. He possessed a most kindly 
spirit. Even in the courts he pitied what he condemned. Those in need of sub- 
stantial assistance found him generous and ready with his aid. He was particularly 
the friend of young lawyers to whom, when asked, he quickly spoke the word of 
timely advice or gave to them a point which would assist them, in their professional 
duties. While at home in the most cultured society, he had the tact to make the 
poorest and humblest feel at ease in his presence. It has been said: "By posterity 
he will be admired for what he has done; but among his contemporaries he is loved 
also for what he is." He passed away in November, 1906, at tlie age of eighty- 
five years. His was "An age serene and bright," and his activity to the last makes 
us mindful of the fact that 

"Age has its opportunity no less than youth. 
Though in another dress." 

He held court on the day before his death and in the evening entertained com- 
pany at his home ; a slight indisposition in the morning and he did not get up. The 
physician thought a day's rest was all that was needed but at two o'clock P. M. he 
passed and thus his death was the fulfillment of the wish that he had often expressed 
that he would die at home. 

No man was ever more respected and no man ever more fully enjoyed the con- 
fidence of the people or more richly deserved the honor in which he was held than 
did Judge Gary. The people of the state, recognizing his merit, rejoiced in his 
advancement. A gracious presence, a charming personality, profound legal wis- 
dom, purity of public and private life and quiet dignity of the ideal follower of his 
calling combined to make him one of the most distinguished and honored residents 
of Illinois. 



PETER A. BIRREN. 



In a history of the undertaking business in Chicago it is imperative that mention 
be made of Peter A. Birren, whose name has been widely known in this connection 
for many years. Moreover, he is one of the native sons of the city whose record has 
at all times been a creditable one and who enjoys an extensive acquaintance here. He 
was born February 14, 1862, a son of Henry and Catherine (Faber,) Birren, who 
arrived in Chicago in 1847, only ten years after the incorporation of the city. The 
father was a blacksmith by trade and both he and his wife have long since passed 
away. 

Peter A. Birren was graduated from St. Michael's parochial school. His father 
established a;i undertaking business in 1859 on Clark street, near Ontario, and also 
conducted a large livery business at what was then No. 122 Eugenia street, having his 
home in the same locality. All was burned at the time of the great Chicago fire, but 
with characteristic energj^ he rebuilt and later he established a branch business at 
Nos. 283 North avenue and 171 East Chicago avenue. He continued in the business 



128 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

for many years^ his death occurring about 1879. He held membership in St. 
Michael's church and was identified with several societies. To him and his wife 
were born ten children, of whom three sons and two daughters are yet living. He 
has a nephew who is still engaged in the undertaking business on North Clark street, 
near Devon. 

It was his father's connection with the business that led Peter A. Birren to 
become identified with undertaking, for after leaving school he joined his father and 
was associated with him while the father remained in business. In 1884 Peter A. 
Birren opened an undertaking parlor at No. 2927 Lincoln avenue, conducting the 
business there on his own account. His was the first undertaking establishment in 
Lakeview. He erected a fine two-story building, with fifty feet of frontage, and in 
1918 began rebuilding at No. 2967 Lincoln avenue, where he has a building twenty- 
five by one hundred and ten feet and two stories in height. His chapel there has a 
seating capacity of two hundred. His equipment includes all that is to be found in 
a first class undertaking establishment of the present day, for at all times he has 
kept in touch with the trend of modern j^rogress and has devoted scientific study and 
investigation to the care of the dead. He has his own automobile livery and he 
carries a large line of caskets and undertakers' supplies. 

On the 24th of July, 1883, Mr. Birren was united in marriage to Miss Julia K. 
Schneider, of Chicago, and they have one son, Alex C, who is married and has one 
child. He is a graduate of St. Ignatius College and is now associated with his father 
in business. 

Mr. Birren is identified with the Knights of The Maccabees and with De Soto 
Council of the Knights of Columbus, a fact which indicates his Catholic faith, as that 
organization draws its membership from those who are identified with the Catholic 
church. He is also connected with various other societies and is a communicant of 
St. Alphonsus church. His political views are in accordance with the principles of the 
democratic party. Since starting out for himself in life he has been engaged in the 
undertaking business and his interests in this line are now extensive and important, 
his business methods well entitling him to the liberal patronage which is accorded 
him. 



EDMUND DANIEL HULBERT. 

Edmund Daniel Hulbert, first vice president of the Merchants Loan & Trust 
Company of Chicago, is a native of Connecticut, his birth having occurred in the 
town of Pleasant Valley, March 2, 1858. His parents were Henry Roberts and 
Emmeline (Stillraan) Hulbert, both of whom were of English lineage and repre- 
sentatives of two of the oldest families of Connecticut. The American progenitor 
of the paternal line was Thomas Hurlbut and the descent is traced down through 
(I) Thomas Hurlbut, who came to America in 1635 and was a soldier in the fort 
at Saybrook, Connecticut. He married and had six sons. 

(II) John Hurlbut, of ISIiddletown, Connecticut, second son of Thomas, wedded 
Mary Deming and had ten children. 

(III) John Hurlbut, Jr., of IMiddletown. eldest child of John Hurlbut, Sr., 
married Rebecca Warner and had four children. 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 129 

(IV) John Hurlbut III, of Middletown, eldest child of John, Jr., married Eliza- 
beth Sage and had eight children. 

(V) Hezekiah Hurlbnt, of Middletown, second child of John III, married 
Anna Hall and had two sons. 

(VI) Daniel Hurlbut, of Middletown, the youngest son of Hezekiah, married 
Hannah Higbee, by whom he had three children, and for his second wife chose 
Hannah Anthony, by whom he had five children. 

(VII) Daniel Hulbert, Jr., of Westfield, Connecticut, eldest child of Daniel, 
married Mercy Graves and had nine children. He wrote his name Hulbert, whicli 
spelling has since been continued by his descendants. 

(VIII) Henry Roberts Hulbert, of Hartford, Connecticut, the youngest child 
of Daniel, Jr., married Emmeline Stillman, a daughter of Edmund and Polly 
(Moore) Stillman, of Colebrook, Connecticut, who was also a representative of 
one of the earliest families of that state, being a descendant in the sixth generation 
of George Stillman, who came from Steeple Ashton, Wiltshire, England, in 1685 
and settled at Hadley, Massachusetts. 

Edmund Daniel Hulbert, the subject of this review, was the only child of 
Henry Roberts Hulbert and was educated in the public schools of Hartford and 
Winsted, Connecticut. His initial business experience came to him in connection 
with the position of messenger in the Hurlbut National Bank of Winsted, Connecti- 
cut, in 1875. On going to Winona, Minnesota, he became bookkeeper in the First 
National Bank there in 1877 and was promoted to the cashiership in 1881, serving 
in that capacity until 1895. In 1895 he came to Chicago and was elected second 
vice president of the Merchants Loan & Trust Company. Three years later, in 
1898, he was advanced to his present position as first vice president of the bank. 
He is also a director of the Pullman Loan & Savings Bank, of which he was one 
of the organizers in 1909. He is likewise interested in various other enterprises, 
which make considerable demand upon his time and attention. 

On the 8th of August, 1897, Mr. Hulbert was married to Miss Emma Strayer, 
a daughter of Captain Samuel Strayer, a soldier of the Civil war who was killed 
in the service. Mr. Hulbert is a member of the Society of Colonial Wars and 
belongs also to the Chicago, University, Bankers and Glen View Clubs. The 
family residence is at No. 2005 Prairie avenue. 



EDWARD JACKSON BRUNDAGE. 

With a nature that could never be content with mediocrity and recognizing the 
fact that advancement at the bar must depend upon individual merit and ability, 
Edward Jackson Brundage has so directed his preliminary studies and subsequent 
labors in the field of law practice that he is today numbered among the able repre- 
sentatives of the Chicago bar and is occupying the position of city corporation 
counsel. He has also attained distinction in political circles and for many years 
has been president of the board of county commissioners of Cook county. He was 
born in Campbell. New York, May 13, 1869, and is a son of Victor and Maria L. 
(Armstrong) Brundage. He laid the foundation for advancement in professional 
lines in a thorough public-school training in Campbell, New York, and Detroit, 



130 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

Michigan, having removed with his parents to the latter city in 1880. There he 
continued his studies until 1883, when at the age of fourteen he entered a railroad 
office in Detroit, remaining there until the removal of the general office to Chicago, 
in 1885. He at once took up the duties of the position at Chicago and remained 
with the company until 1898, at which time he had risen to the position of chief clerk. 
His ambition, however, lay in the field of professional service and he devoted his 
leisure hours to the study of law until, having mastered Kent, Blackstone and other 
commentaries and gained a somewhat extended knowledge of the general j^rinciples 
of jurisprudence, he successfully passed the required examination, which secured 
his admission to the bar in 1892. Desiring a more technical training at the schools, 
he entered the Chicago College of Law and was graduated LL. B. in 1893. Enter- 
ing upon active practice, he has been accorded a liberal clientage that attests superior 
powers on the part of an advocate and counselor. He never fails to give a thorough 
preparation and enters the courts prepared for defense as well as for attacks. His 
deductions are logical, his reasoning clear and cogent and his arguments forceful 
and resultant. He is now city corporation counsel and previous to being called to 
this position has held other offices of more than local prominence. In his political 
views he is an earnest republian and represented the sixth senatorial district in 
the forty-first and forty-third general assemblies. In November, 1904, he was 
elected president of the board of county commissioners of Cook county. That he is 
regarded as one of Chicago's representative citizens is indicated in the fact that 
he was chosen vice president for Illinois of the Pan American exposition at Buffalo, 
New York. 

Mr. Brundage finds pleasant social relations with the Masonic fraternity, in 
which he has attained the Knight Templar degree, the Knights of Pythias, the Royal 
League and the Columbian Knights. He also belongs to the Chicago Athletic Club 
and the Marquette Club, but all these interests are subsidiarj'^ to his law practice and 
official service, upon which his energies and interests are centered. 



F. WILLIAM HOCHSPEIER. 

Many a well known and successful business man of Chicago started upon his 
commercial career as did F. William Hochspeier, as a cash boy in the mercantile 
establishment of Marshall Field & Company. From that humble position he has 
steadily worked his way upward until he ranks with the leading undertakers of 
Chicago and controls a business of large volume and importance. He is one of 
Chicago's native sons, born on the 17th of May, 1870. His parents were Philip 
and Margareta (Kuby) Hochspeier, both of whom were natives of Germany, whence 
they came to the new world in the '40s. The father was engaged in the coal and 
wood business for a long period and he and his brother John were engaged in the 
cabinet making business as early as 1855 on Randolph street near Halsted street, 
and in connection with their trade they made coffins but were never actively engaged 
in the undertaking business. The death of Philip Hochspeier occurred in 1875, 
while his widow survived for several years, passing away in 1886. 

F. William Hochspeier acquired a public school education and when his text- 
books were put aside began providing for his own support as a cash boy for Marshall 




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Pl 



AST->:!. U 






CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 133 

Field & Company, He was afterward employed along various lines and in 1892 he 
began business on his own account as a dealer in coal and also conducted a teaming 
business. In 1896 he turned his attention to the undertaking business, entering into 
partnership with C. F. Grashoff, with whom he was associated for a year. In the 
latter part of 1 897 he opened an undertaking business independently on West North 
avenue, near Western avenue, and from that time forward prospered in business, 
his patronage steadily increasing. In 1912 he erected a new building twenty-five by 
one hundred and twenty-five feet and two stories in height. He uses both floors for 
the business, having show rooms upstairs, while on the first floor there is a chapel 
finished in early English style, with art glass windows and with inverted lights, and 
with a seating capacity of one hundred and fifteen. The office in front has a tiled 
floor and there is an air of neatness and orderliness that pervades the place that is 
most pleasing. He maintains a separate automobile business under the name of 
F. W. Hochspeier, Inc. In this connection he has two auto hearses, three limousines 
and two touring cars and does business for oriiers as well as for himself and was 
one of the first to have a complete auto hearse, which he secured in 1912. 

In 1889 Mr. Hochspeier was united in marriage to Miss Anna A. Klock, of 
Elgin, Illinois. Fraternally he is connected with Humboldt Lodge, No. 813, A. F. 
& A. M.; also with Northwest Chapter, No. 224, R. A. M., Humboldt Park Com- 
mandery, No. 79, K. T., Oriental Consistory, S. P. R. S., and Medinah Temple, 
A. A. O. N. M. S. He likewise has membership with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and in the Northwestern Commercial Association. In politics he 
maintains an independent course and has never sought or desired office, preferring 
to concentrate his efforts and attention upon his business affairs, which, wisely 
directed, have brought to him a substantial measure of prosperity. He is held in 
high esteem as a m^an, as a citizen and by his brethren of the Masonic order, and 
his life record indicates what may be accomplished where there is a will to dare 
and to do. Starting out in a humble capacity, he has advanced steadily step by 
step, his career proving his resourcefulness, his adaptability and his thorough 
reliability. Since the above was written, Mr. Hochspeier has passed away. 



JOHN JACOB HERRICK. 

The legal career of John Jacob Herrick has been particularly free from the 
spectacular elements so frequently connected with the trial of cases before the 
court, but has been characterized by those substantial qualities which grow stronger 
with the passing years, study and experience bringing to the individual the wis- 
dom that practically obviates the possession of a faulty construction of the law 
or misapplication of legal principles. Private and corporate interests have been 
intrusted to his professional keeping to such an extent that his position as a dis- 
tinguished member of the bar is thus attested. He is now senior partner of the 
firm of Herrick, Allen & Martin. 

Illinois is proud to number among her native sons men of such substantial worth 
and professional skill as Mr. Herrick, who was born in Hillsboro, Montgomery 
county, May 25, 1845. His parents were Dr. William B. and Martha (Seward) 



134 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

Herrick, who in his youthful days removed with their son to Chicago. The Her- 
rick family is of English origin, the family seat for many generations being at 
Leicestershire, where certain of the descendants are still living. Jacob Herrick, 
the great-grandfather of John J. Herrick, was a lieutenant in the Revolutionary 
war and following the period of hostilities settled at Durham, Maine, becoming a 
Congregational minister there. The grandfather was a native of Durham, as was 
also Dr. Herrick. The father occupied a position of distinction among the 
physicians of this city about the middle portion of the nineteenth century. He acted 
as surgeon of a regiment of Illinois volunteers during the ^Mexican war and on 
his return home became one of the first professors of Rush Medical College, filling 
for many years the chair of anatomy and materia medica. To him was accorded 
the honor of election as the first president of the Illinois State Medical Society. 
His name, too, was known in scientific circles and his presence and cooperation 
graced and promoted many social and civic affairs. Impaired health caused by 
the rigorous campaign in the ^lexican war forced him to seek a change of climate 
in 1857, and he returned to his native state of Maine. His wife was a daughter 
of John B. Seward, who was born in New Jersey but became one of the pioneer 
residents of INIontgomery county, Illinois. 

Following the removal of the family to Chicago John J. Herrick pursued his 
education in public and private schools until the removal of his parents to Maine, 
when he was twelve years of age. In 1857 he enrolled as a student in the academy 
at Lewiston Falls, Maine, and through the succeeding five years by a thorough 
preliminary course prepared for college. He then matriculated in Bowdoin Col- 
lege, which conferred upon him the Bachelor of Arts degree on his graduation in 
1866. Liberal mental training had qualified him for important responsibilities 
and his thoughts again turned to Chicago where he had spent a portion of his 
boyhood. In the winter of 1866 and 1867 he again became a resident of this city 
and took his first step toward professional advancement as a teacher in the public 
schools of Hyde Park ere that section had been annexed to the city. His leisure 
hours were devoted to the study of law and at the close of the school year he became 
a student in the law school of the old Chicago University, now the Union College 
of Law, and at the same time was a student in the office of Higgins, Swett & 
Quig. In the spring of 1868 he was graduated with valedictorian honors but 
remained with the firm of Higgins, Swett & Quig until just before the great fire 
of 1871, when he entered upon an independent practice. He remained alone until 
1878, and gradually advanced in the profession. In relation to his connection with 
the Chicago bar a contemporary biographer said: "From the very outset his 
thoroughness of prei^aration in whatever litigation was intrusted to him inspired 
that confidence in himself which was infectious and an assurance of success. Among 
the important cases of this period which he conducted were those growing out of 
the failure of the firm of John B. Lyon & Company in 1872, with their suspension 
from the Board of Trade, and those based upon the alleged fraudulent election 
of Michael Evans and others to the South Town offices, and their ouster from office 
in 1876. By 1878 Mr. Herrick's standing was of such a character that he was 
able to form a partnership with Wirt Dexter, one of the most eminent lawyers in 
the countrv. and in 1880 tliev were ioined bv Charles L. Allen under the firm name 
of Dexter, Herrick &: Allen, an association which continued until the death of 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 135 

Mr. Dexter, in May, 1890. The remaining partners conducted the business until 
May, 1893, when they received I. K. Boyesen, forming the copartnership of Her- 
rick, Allen & Boyesen, which continued until 1896, when Horace H. Martin was 
admitted, to form the firm of Herrick, Allen, Boyesen & Martin. Upon the with- 
drawal of Mr. Boyesen in 1908 on account of failing health the present business 
style of Herrick, Allen & Martin was adopted. It is largely due to the wise coun- 
sel and the ceaseless professional labors of the senior member that the firm has 
received such a generous share of the important litigation of the city involving 
both private and corporate interests. Personally Mr. Herrick has been particularly 
prominent in the case of Devine versus the People, which involved the constitution- 
ality of the law authorizing the county commissioners of Cook county to issue bonds 
without authority of popular vote ; Barron versus Burnside, argued before the 
supreme court of Iowa and the supreme court of the United States, involving the 
validity of the Iowa statute as to corporations of other states, known as the Domesti- 
cation Law; Stevens versus Pratt and Kingsbury versus Sperry (before the supreme 
court of Illinois,) and Gross versus United States Mortgage Company and United 
States Mortgage Company versus Kingsbury (before the United States supreme 
court), by which were decided important questions as to the rights of foreign 
corporations in Illinois and the construction of the Illinois statute as to guardians ; 
the cases of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad Company versus Dey and the 
State versus Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company, argued before the 
United States courts in Iowa, Nebraska and Illinois, and covering broad questions 
of constitutional law in their relations to the rights of railroad corporations ; Spalding 
versus Preston, embracing new and important points as to the construction of 
the Illinois Assignment law ; also the Taylor and Storey will cases ; the great 
legal conflict between Eastern, English and Chicago interests in the stock yards 
cases ; the People versus Kirk, involving the constitutionality of the act author- 
izing the extension of boulevards over the waters of Lake Michigan, and the 
rights of riparian owners under the act; the elevator cases, involving vital ques- 
tions as to the rights and powers of elevator proprietors under the Illinois con- 
stitution and the warehouse act; Hale versus Hale, in which far-reaching ques- 
tions as to the jurisdiction of courts of chancery to authorize sales or leases of 
trust property not authorized by the trust instrument were decided; the important 
litigation between the Rock Island Railroad Company and the Hannibal & St. 
Joseph Railroad Company as to the relative rights of lessor and lessee companies ; 
Chicago Theological Seminary versus the People, in the supreme court of the United 
States, involving important questions as to the construction and effect of charter 
exemptions from taxation; Field versus Barling, involving new questions as to 
the right of lot owners to prevent obstructions of light, air, etc., above the public 
highways; the protracted and extensive litigation with reference to the Lake Street 
Elevated Railroad, in which the principal parties in interest were William Zeigler 
on the one side and Charles T. Yerkes on the other, and which involved many 
important questions as to the rights of mortgage bondholders and stockholders, 
and the jurisdiction of state and federal courts; the contested will case of Palmer 
versus Bradley, in the state and federal courts; the litigation as to the rights of 
the Chicago Telephone Company under its ordinance; the litigation between the 
city of Chicago and the state and the street railway companies as to the rights 
of the street railway companies ; and the recent Fish-Harriman litigation involving 



136 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

important and far-reaching questions as to the right of corporations of other states 
to hold and vote the stock of Illinois railroad companies. 

On the 28th of June, 1883, i\Ir. Herrick was united in marriage, in New York, 
to Miss Julie T. Dulon, and the children born of this union are Clara M., Julie T. 
and Margaret J. The family residence is at No. 45 East Schiller street and high 
as is his position in professional circles Mr. Herrick is seen at his best when with 
his family and friends at his own fireside. He is a man of attractive social qualities 
which, combined with his broad knowledge and conversational powers, render him 
an agreeable companion. His name is on the membership roll of three of the leading 
clubs of the city, the University, the Chicago and the Chicago Literary. He also 
belongs to the Chicago Bar Association, the Law Institute and the Citizens Associa- 
tion. These connections indicate his interest in the vital questions of the day and 
in municipal progress. He has never entered actively into politics as a worker in 
party ranks, but has given earnest and thoughtful consideration to party jDolicies 
and tlie basic principles upon which they rest. On questions of national importance 
he voted with the republican organization until 1884'. In that year and again in 
1888 he supported Grover Cleveland and at the present time he occupies an inde- 
pendent political position. He never fears to express and uphold his opinions, 
for they are based upon an honest belief in their efficiency as factors for public 
progress and general good. His course in every relation of life has made the 
name of John J. Herrick an honored one in Chicago. 



DANIEL J. HORAN. 



Daniel J. Horan, a well known undertaker of Chicago, was born September 10, 
1856, in the city where he still resides, a son of Patrick and Ellen Horan, both of 
whom were natives of Ireland. Leaving the Emerald isle, they came to Chicago in 
1847 after crossing the Atlantic on one of the old-time sailing vessels. They arrived 
in Illinois only ten years after the incorporation of Chicago as a city and when it gave 
little evidence of becoming the great metropolitan center which it is today. Mr. 
Horan engaged in stock buying, purchasing stock in the country and selling it in 
Chicago. He continued a resident of the city until his death, which occurred in 
1880^ his widow surviving him for more than a decade and passing away in 1891. 

The parents were of the Catholic faith and Daniel J. Horan pursued his education 
in St. John's parochial school. He made his initial start in the business world as an 
employe in a planing mill and afterward learned the cooper's trade. In 1883 and 
1884 he served as supervisor of the South Town, succeeding Robert T. Lincoln, son 
of Abraham Lincoln, in that office. Later he was called to the position of deputy 
sherijff of Cook county and continued in the position until 1887. In that year he 
turned his attention to the undertaking business, which he established at No. 169 
East Eighteenth street, there remaining for twenty years, or until 1907, when he 
made a removal to No. 2156 Archer avenue. Two years later, or in 1909 he removed 
to No. 307 Sixty-first street, where he has since remained, occupying a building 
with a frontage of twenty-five feet and containing a chapel with a seating capacity 
for seventy-five. The family has always been quite prominent in public interests. 
His brother, James Horan, served for twenty-nine years as a member of the Chicago 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 137 

Fire Department and was prominent and honored as its chief. He was killed in 
the disastrous stock yards fire of December i, 1910. 

In 1885 Mr. Horan was united in marriage to Miss Katie A. Lynch, of Chicago, 
and they have become the parents of eight children, the family circle yet remaining 
unbroken by the hand of death. There are four sons and four daughters. Mr. Horan 
is a member of St. Bernard's Court of the Catholic Order of Foresters and of Emery 
A. Storrs Council of the Royal Arcanum. He is also identified with Englewood 
Council of the Knights of Columbus and has membership in St. Bernard Catholic 
church. In politics he is a stalwart advocate of republican principles and is a 
member of the Thirty-Second Ward Republican Club. He served as alderman from 
the second ward in 1892 and 1893 and has always been interested in politics but 
has not been to any extent an aspirant for public office. He is active, however, in 
support of all measures and movements which tend to benefit the city and isa mem- 
ber of the Sixty-first Street Business Men's Association. He is likewise connected 
along the line of his chosen jDrofession with the Chicago Undertakers Association, of 
which he served as president in 1889 and 1890, and he belongs to the Motor Livery- 
men's Association. He is well known as a representative of a j^rominent old and 
honored Irish family of the city connected with Chicago for seventy years and at all 
times manifesting a helpful interest in everything that has to do with her welfare 
and ui^building. 



AARON R. WOLFF. 



Aaron R. Wolff, the efficient president of the Independent Drug Company and 
therefore one of the leading merchants and business men of Chicago, was born in 
New York, September 25, 1868, a son of Isaac and Anna Wolff, who removed west- 
ward to this city in 1870. The father was a cutter in the Wolff retail tailoring 
establishment, situated at the corner of Halsted and Madison streets. 

Aaron R. Wolff early in life showed a taste for business activity. He acquired 
a public school education and when fourteen years of age sold newspapers and ran a 
bootblacking stand. He had papers and blacking outfits on the L. S. & M. S. trains, 
running from the stock yards to the La Salle street station. During this period 
of his life he blacked the boots of such stock yard celebrities as Nelson Morris and 
also Ike Waixel. Naturally he took a great interest in the doings at the yards and 
soon became connected with Jeremiah Knowles, a broker in live stock. At the age of 
eighteen years he began business on his own account and was the youngest speculator 
ever at the stock yards. He continued as a live stock broker there for twenty-one 
years and became a prominent and well known figure in packing house and live 
stock circles. In 1904 he also turned his attention to the drug business, becoming 
associated with Frank Purnell on November of that year, at No. 203 South State 
street under the name of The Independent Drug Company. They leased the prop- 
erty at that time and with the death of Mr. Purnell in January, 1905, Mr. Wolff 
organized a company in which he was associated with Mrs. Purnell and with Herbert 
Henry, the latter becoming manager of the business, Mr. Wolff taking no active part 
in the management. Two years later, the business not proving profitable under that 
control, Mr. Wolff left the stock yards to actively take up the management of the 



138 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

drug business and about that time Mrs. Purnell and Mr. Henry sold out. When 
Mr. Wolff assumed control the company had no credit and its indebtedness was 
quite large. He induced his brothers, Harry and Henry, to purchase an interest 
in the business and their association has since been maintained, Harry R. Wolfe 
being the secretary and treasurer. While the two are brothers they do not use the 
same spelling of the name. Since that time the business has prospered. They have 
been sagacious in surrounding themselves with a corps of able assistants and they 
secured as manager in 1916 Sidney Salomon, a man of long commercial experience, 
who had been merchandise manager with Siegel Cooper & Company. A history 
of The Independent Drug Company and its development is given below. 

On the ith of November, 1901, Mr. Wolff was united in marriage to Miss Martha 
Marks, of Chicago, and to them were born two children, Rozina and Robert. The 
wife and mother passed away in 1905. Mr. Wolff is a member of the Illinois 
Athletic Club, also of the Hampton Shore Club, Ancient Craft Lodge, A. F. & A. M., 
and also the B'nai B'rith, a Jewish organization. In politics he maintains an inde- 
pendent course, voting for men and measures rather than party. He does not seek 
office, preferring to give his undivided time and attention to his business affairs, 
which, carefully directed, have brought to him increasing success and he is today 
one of the most prominent figures in the drug circles of the day. 



THE INDEPENDENT DRUG COMPANY. 

A most important factor in the drug trade of Chicago is The Independent Drug 
Company, of which Aaron R. Wolff is the president, Henry M. Wolfe, second vice 
president, Sidney Salomon, vice president and general manager, and Harry R. Wolfe, 
secretary and treasurer. Mr. Salomon became associated with the company on the 
1st of February, 1916, severing his connection as merchandise manager with Siegel 
Cooper & Company to enter upon his present relations. The Independent Drug 
Company was organized in April, 1905, and its first store was located at Adams and 
State streets, in the Republic building. On the 1st of May, 1915, a removal was 
made to No. 137 South State street and on the 9th of February, 1916, a second store 
was opened at No. 1700 Kenmore avenue. In May, 1916, a third store was opened 
at No. 4201 Broadway and in September, 1916, further stores were opened at No. 5937 
Broadway and No. 4732 South Ashland avenue. In December of the same year a 
new establishment was added to this chain of stores at No. 459 East Forty-seventh 
street and in January, 1917, another at No. 100 East Garfield boulevard. The month 
of February saw the establishment of a store at No. 4758 Washington boulevard and 
in March was opened the store of the company at the northwest corner of Wabash 
avenue and Van Buren street. Then came the establishment of a store at No. 364 
East Fifty-first street in November and the store at No. 3459 South Halsted street 
on the 17th of December, making a chain of eleven stores in all. Moreover, all are 
large establishments, and something of the volume of the business transacted is indi- 
cated in the fact that the company today employs about two hundred people, including 
twenty-five registered pharmacists. Nearly all of the goods which they handle 
are manufactured by the Valdona Company for The Independent Drug Company 
under their own name. They have five and ten year leases on all their stores. 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 139 

Warehouses and offices are maintained at No. 206 South Wabash avenue and the 
company is now planning the establishment of a warehouse on the railway tracks. 
They do no jobbing or wholesale business but have the largest retail business 
in Chicago. The State street store has the largest trade of any one establish- 
ment not only in Chicago but in the entire United States. The store occupies a 
building thirty-five by one hundred and fifty-nine feet interior measurement and 
has a balcony sixty-five by ten feet. Eighty people are emiDloyed in that store 
alone. The company believes in large advertising, a policy which was estab- 
lished by Mr. Salomon in 1916. To this is greatly due the growth of the 
business, backed by good merchandising methods. They have the largest pre- 
scription business in the city and they have ever followed the "money back" 
plan. Patrons know that they will receive fair treatment and reliable goods. The 
managers are brought up with the company and work on a commission basis, this 
stimulating increased effort and care. The company has a warehouse space of 
seventy-five hundred square feet. In February, 1917, they also started a mail 
order department and issued a large catalogue, listing about ten thousand items. 
This catalogue is circulated all over the United States. The company has also 
added many specialties not usually sold in drug stores. In December they handle 
toys and they also sell phonographs and records, hair nets, snap fasteners, knitting 
needles, pins and watches, and they were the first establishment to handle service 
buttons. The branching out of the firm along these lines is the result of Mr. Salo- 
mon's business experience in other connections. The business is thoroughly organ- 
ized in every department and meetings are held every Thursday morning at which 
all managers are present and business methods are discussed. Bulletins are sent 
out every day and the company keeps in close touch with the public. Expert 
accounting is carried on and a cost system is maintained. The company puts out 
the finest window displays in Chicago, all window trimmings being done by experts, 
and their advertising business is cared for by experts as well. The progressive 
methods of the company may well be followed by others, showing what may be 
accomplished through such plans. 



F. WILLIAM NELLES. 



F. William Nelles, a Chicago undertaker, who has spent almost his entire life in 
this city, was born in Middleton, Wisconsin, October 26, 1871, a son of Jacob and 
Margaret (Moll) Nelles, both of whom were natives of Cologne, Germany, but 
came to the United States in childhood and were married in Wisconsin. They there 
resided until 1872, when they removed with their family to Chicago, and the father 
was for several years connected with the wholesale grocery house of Bois, Fay & 
Conkey. Later he engaged in business on his own account as a retail milk dealer, 
and in 1887 he entered the undertaking business at the corner of Cornelia and Noble 
streets, where he remained for a short time. He bought out the business of Peter 
Mueller, an old-time undertaker, at what was then No. 596 Milwaukee avenue, and 
there he continued in business until 1913, when he retired from active life and was 
succeeded by his sons, F. William and Winand H. Nelles. In May, 1903, a branch 
establishment was opened at No. 1672 North avenue, where they remained for six 



140 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

years, and in 1909 a new building was erected at No. 4041 North avenue in the 
same block, having a frontage of forty-nine feet and a depth of sixty-seven feet. 
On the property there is also a garage with a capacity for fourteen cars. The 
establishment contains a chapel seating one hundred people. The business was 
conducted under the firm style of J. Nelles & Sons until the father retired, and 
since that time F. William Nelles has conducted the North avenue establishment. 

Brought to Chicago during his infancy, F. William Nelles pursued his education 
in the parochial schools and in night schools of this city and after his textbooks 
were put aside he began learning the trade of hardwood finishing. Later, at the 
age of nineteen years, he entered the undertaking business in connection with his 
father, who instructed him in all branches of the work, and his efficiency enabled him 
ultimately to take charge of the business as his father's successor. From the age 
of nineteen he has continued in this field of labor and his close application, his 
honorable dealing and his trustworthiness have secured to him a liberal patronage 
that has made his business a profitable one. 

On the IQtli of September, 1896, Mr. Nelles was united in marriage to Miss Cora 
Du Plain, of Chicago, and to them have been born the following named children. 
William, who attended the Illinois Business College and was graduated from Wor- 
sham's School of Embalming, is now in business with his father. Leonard, Mer- 
cedes, Burton and Arthur are the younger members of the family. 

Mr. Nelles is identified with the Chicago Undertakers Association and the Chi- 
cago Motor Liverymen's Association. His religious faith is that of the Catholic 
church and he and his family are communicants of St. Philomena's Catholic church. 
Fraternally he is connected with the Catholic Order of Foresters and also Avith 
the Columbian Circle, the Knights of The Maccabees, the Royal League, the Modern 
Woodmen of America, the Mutual Benefit & Aid Society and the Plattdeutsche 
Gilde of the U. S. A. In politics he maintains an independent course. Socially 
he is identified with the German-American Club of Chicago and the Kedvale Social 
Club of the northwest side. He is well known in this city, where his entire life has 
been passed, and as the years have gone on he has won a constantly increasing circle 
of friends by reason of his extensive business, fraternal and social relations. 



FRANKLIN PARMELEE. 

Franklin Parmelee, who was the head and founder of the great transfer system 
which bears his name, was born in Byron, Genesee count}'. New York, August 
11, 1816, being the son of Edward and Mercy (Hopkins) Parmelee. In 1815 
the parents had removed to Byron from Vermont, Edward Parmelee being among 
the pioneer agriculturists of the Genesee valley. The school advantages of young 
Parmelee were such as a country settled by New England pioneers might be ex- 
pected to furnish. He therefore thoroughly gained the rudiments of learning, al- 
though his home was on the frontier and his school days came to an end before 
he had entered upon his teens. Prior to his twelfth birthday he put aside his 
text-books and left tlie parental roof to earn his own livelihood. His mother, 
though unable to aid him financially, gave him plenty of good advice and added 
to his belongings a needle and spool of black thread, admonishing him to take 




FRANKLIN PARMELEE 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBKAHY 



ASTOT{. LENOX AND 
TlLl'iiN FOCNDAT\ONS 
L 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 143 

pride in himself and always keep neat and clean. Going to Avon Springs, he 
began work on a farm and a year later became clerk in a public house under his 
previous emjaloyer. At the age of fifteen he entered a stage office in Batavia, re- 
maining there for five years. On the expiration of that period he settled in Erie, 
Pennsylvania, where he served for the same length of time under General Reed, 
who owned various steamers and employed our subject as clerk on one of them. 
Mr. Parmelee's first visit to Chicago was due to his intimacy with General Reed. 
Through him he obtained a position as clerk on the steamer James Madison, which 
in 1837 was running between Buffalo and Chicago. He continued as clerk on 
various steamers until 1850, when he embarked in the mercantile business on his 
own account in Will county, Illinois. In the spring of 1853 he took up his abode 
in Chicago, here continuing to reside throughout the remainder of his life. Im- 
mediately following his arrival he began the operation of the Chicago Omnibus 
Line, the first one in this city. His outfit consisted of six omnibuses and wagons. 
In addition to furnishing facilities for depot travel, in 1854-, Mr. Parmelee estab- 
lished a line of omnibuses on Madison street, which ran as far west as Bull's 
Head or the present Union Park. A four-horse omnibus line was put on in 1855 
and extended to Cottage Grove, by way of State to Twelfth street, then the out- 
skirts of this city. This line Mr. Parmelee maintained until 1858, when the right 
of way was granted to the Chicago City Railway Company to lay tracks on State 
street and Cottage Grove avenue, on Archer avenue and on Madison street to the 
city limits. The permission to construct the tracks was granted to Henry Fuller, 
Franklin Parmelee and Liberty Bigelow of Boston. In 1856-7 Mr. Parmelee 
placed another line on Clark street. M. O. & S. B. Walker put on an opposition 
line, and Mr. Parmelee withdrew from the field. After 1863, when the horse- 
railway charter covering the west-side lines was sold, he devoted himself exclusively 
to the transportation and transfer business, which was transacted in his splendid 
slate-roofed building, the Garrett block, at the corner of State and Randolph 
streets, afterward destroyed by the great fire of 1871. At that time Liberty Bigelow 
was his partner. Eleven weeks after the destruction of his property by the fire, a 
brick structure, one hundred by one hundred and fifty-three feet, had been erected. 
In 1881 an addition of eighty-eight by one hundred and fifty-three feet was made 
to the original building. Mr. Parmelee occupied nearly half a square block be- 
tween Franklin street and Fifth avenue and had contracts for the transfer busi- 
ness with all the railroads entering in Chicago. He was one of the incorporators 
of the Chicago City Railway Company, his associates being Liberty Bigelow, 
Henry Fuller and David Gage. Its projectors obtained from the legislature a 
confirmation of their rights by an act which was approved February 14, 1859. 
Subsequently the Parmelee transfer business was capitalized for a half million 
dollars and the stock was divided among the members of his family. In 1901 it 
was sold to a sjmdicate composed of Marshall Field, John J. ^Mitchell, Frank 
Lowden and other prominent Chicagoans, who still continue the business under 
the name of the Frank Parmelee Transfer Company. 

Franklin Parmelee often declared that the needle and thread, together with 
the words of advice, which his mother gave him when he started out in the world 
on his own account, were the most powerful factors in his success. He carried 
that thread and needle until the day of his death and they were buried mth him. 
In speaking of the subject, he said: "It has made me take pride in myself and 

Vol. IV— 8 



144 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

appear to advantage before others. That's what you must do if you wish to win 
success." "That was the secret of my success," he told each of his children when 
the}' were old enough to understand the moral. His career was one of almost 
ceaseless endeavor, marked by continiiity of purpose throughout. Beginning his 
career in comparative obscurity and poverty, he gradually rose to a position of 
prominence and affluence and lived to enjoy the fulfillment of his greatest ambition 
— the development of a transportation business that would be a credit to his name. 

In September, 1840, Mr. Parmelee was united in marriage to Miss Adeline 
Whitne}^, of Hindsburg, Orleans county, New York, who died in January, 1864, 
leaving four children. Adeline is now the widow of Charles W. Wheeler, who died 
on the 14th of March, 1902, and was a son of Hiram Wheeler, a prominent early 
resident of Chicago and a member of the firm of Wheeler, Munger & Company, 
grain merchants. The late C. W. Wheeler and his brother, George Henry, were 
also members of that concern. The other children of Mr. Parmelee and his first 
wife were: John Whitney, who is now deceased; Charles King, who has also 
passed away and whose widow resides in Kenilworth, Illinois ; and Franklin Par- 
melee, Jr., who wedded a Miss Freeman of Chicago. In October, 1868, Mr. 
Parmelee was again married, his second union being with Mrs. Roxana W. Smith, 
of Kenosha, Wisconsin, who is now deceased. 

In politics Mr. Parmelee was a democrat, while his religious faith was indicated 
by his membership in the Universalist church. He was also a worthy exemplar 
of the Masonic fraternity. Naturally of a kind heart, his sympathies were easily 
enlisted in behalf of those who needed assistance. To his family he was a devoted 
husband and father and he held friendship inviolable. He possessed a strong 
nature, a kindly spirit, and his life was actuated by high, manly principles, and 
when he was called from this earth Chicago mourned the loss of one of its most 
valued citizens and representative men. 



CONRAD KAMPP. 



In a history of the develojjment of the undertaking business in Chicago it is 
imperative that mention be made of Conrad Kampp, who was the founder of the 
business that for many years has been carried on under the firm style of C. Kampp 
& Son after having been conducted for an extended period under his own name. In 
fact Conrad Kampp was a pioneer undertaker of northeastern Illinois, having 
established at Wheaton in 1867 the first undertaking establishment between Chicago 
and Elgin. Mr. Kampp was a native of Germany, born on the 31st of July, 1835, 
and his life record covered the intervening period to the 18th of August, 1910, 
when he was called to his final rest, having attained the age of seventy-five years. 
In young manhood he had come to the United States and was first emjDloyed in con- 
nection with a piano accessories business. Later he engaged in the cabinet manu- 
facturing business and afterward was identified with the furniture trade. From 
this jjoint it was but a step to the undertaking business, which, as previously stated, 
was established by him at Wheaton in 1867. In the early days his wife made all 
the shrouds and also the linings for the caskets, while Mr. Kampp himself made the 
coffins, at which period a thirty-five dollar sale was equal to a hundred and fifty 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 145 

dollar sale of the present time. Mr. Kampp started with very little money and at 
tlie beginning of the business bought goods from F. H. Hill & Company and 
remained a customer of them until his death, while his son still continues as customer 
of that firm, having probably the oldest continued account with the house. A strong 
friendship sprang up between Mr. Kampp and Mr. Hill that continued until they 
were separated by death. Mr. Kampp lost an arm in early life but notwithstanding 
this handicap succeeded in his business, which grew and developed as the vears 
passed on, for his patrons, pleased with his kindliness, his tact and his helpfulness 
in their hour of bereavement, were continually speaking a good word for him that 
led to the constant increase of his trade. 

Mr. Kampp was also interested in community affairs and became a member of 
the old volunteer fire department of Chicago. He ever stood for those things which 
were most worth while in the community and his career, whether in connection with 
his business affairs or in connection with public interests, was ever characterized by 
a spirit of progressiveness. 

In early manhood Mr. Kampp was united in marriage to Miss Lugardis Loos, a 
native of Alsace-Lorraine, France, the marriage being celebrated in Chicago. 
Mrs. Kampp is still living at the age of eighty-two years and is enjoying remarkable 
health, being a most splendidly preserved woman. To Mr. and Mrs. Kampp were 
born five children: John H., who conducts the old undertaking establishment at 
Wheaton which was founded by his father more than a half century ago, and who is 
married and has a son, Harry, and a daughter, Mrs. Florence Wieger, of Elm- 
hurst, Illinois, the former being now in business with his father ; Anna, the widow 
of L. L. Stark and a resident of Chicago; Amand, who died leaving a wife and one 
child; Joseph P., manager of the firm of C. Kampp & Son; and Lugardis, who resides 
with her mother in Chicago. • ' , 

As the sons reached adult age there was not room for all in the undertaking 
establishment at Wheaton, and a branch was opened at Elmhurst about 1887. This 
was conducted by Mr. Kampp and his two older sons and later one of the sons spent 
most of his time there. In 1891 the Austin branch was opened and in 1893 another 
establishment was opened on North Cicero avenue, formerly Forty-eighth avenue, 
which district was then known as Mooreland. This made four places in all owned 
by the company. In 1891 J. H. Kampp took over the Wheaton and Elmhurst 
business, while the father, Conrad Kampp, removed to Austin and conducted the 
Austin and Mooreland stores in association with his two sons, Amand and Joseph P. 
The former continued an active factor in the business until his death, which occurred 
November 23, 1908, while Joseph P. continued as a partner with his father in busi- 
ness. After the father's death the Mooreland branch was closed and Mr. Kampp 
continued in business in Austin. 

Joseph P. Kampp, now at the head of the business, was born in Wheaton, June 
28, 1874, and after acquiring a public school education entered business with his 
father when but a boy. At the age of nineteen years he was in charge of the busi- 
ness, becoming active in the direction of the Austin establishment. When the busi- 
ness was opened at Austin they occupied a little room in a frame building on what 
was then known as "Yankee Row," but afterward a new building was constructed 
at No. 550 North Parkside avenue, where for twenty-six years the establishment 
was maintained. During the summer of 1917 property was purchased at Nos. 318 
to 320 North Central avenue, where an attractive residence was remodeled into the 



146 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

most modern and up-to-date undertaking establishment in Chicago. The firm sought 
to eliminate all the commercial and forbidding atmosphere of the average under- 
taking establishment and to provide a commodious residential home for the use of 
patrons who find it inconvenient to hold funeral ser\dces in crowded apartments. 
Every detail was carefully studied and everything that would outwardly suggest a 
funereal atmosphere was placed in the background, eliminating anything that would 
shock the finest sensibilities. There is a large and commodious reception room at 
the right, while to the left are parlors which have been arranged and decorated to 
give the appearance and refinement of a modern home. Opening off from the back 
parlor is a private room which is called the family room, giving absolute privacy 
to the members of a bereaved family while services are being conducted. There is 
a well equipped business office with trunk telei^hone lines and the second floor of 
the building is utilized for display rooms, in which is to -be seen an extensive line of 
the finest caskets of various kinds, including bronze, steel, cement and copper. The 
third floor is used for storerooms and slee^Jing rooms for the assistants, who are always 
on duty and can be reached at all hours, day or night. The company maintains an 
automobile service, there being a commodious garage on the jilace. Mr. Kampp 
was actuated by a most humanitarian spirit in fitting out this establishment, where a 
family can have every j^rivacy of the home and yet have sufficiently commodious 
quarters to meet the demands of large funerals. 

On the 15th of August, 1906, Mr. Kamp^j was united in marriage to Miss Kath- 
ryn Sendlebach, a native of Chicago and a daughter of Edward Sendlebach, who 
removed to St. Louis, where he was a wagon-wheel manufacturer. To Mr. and 
INIrs. Kampi^ have been born four children: Hubert Eugene, ten years of age; 
Kathryn, aged seven; Clare, aged four; and Joseph, Jr., a little lad of two summers. 
The family are members of St. Lucy's Catholic church. Mr. Kampp's political 
allegiance is given to the republican party. His father was one of the earliest 
representatives of the Chicago Undertakers Association and Joseph Kampp of this 
review is identified therewith. He is a progressive business man, a valued and 
respected citizen of his community and through the twenty-seven years of his con- 
nection with the trade in Austin he has maintained an unassailable reputation for 
business integrity'. 



THOMAS J. McNULTY. 



Thomas J. ]\IcXulty is the president of the firm of ]\IcNulty Brothers Company, 
plastering contractors. He was born in County Mayo, Ireland, January 12, 1861, 
a son of James and Bridget (McXulty) McXulty, both of whom passed away on 
the Emerald isle. He acquired his early education in the public schools of his native 
country, where he remained until he reached the age of sixteen, and then came to 
the new world, attracted by the favorable reports which he had heard concerning 
the business opportunities and other advantages to be enjoyed on this side of the 
Atlantic. He located first in Philadelphia, where he attended school and studied 
mechanical drawing at a technical high school, Broad and Spring Garden streets, in 
that city. He afterward entered upon an apprenticeship to the plastering trade 
and soon after completing his term of indenture he removed to the west with Chicago 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 147 

as his destination, taking np his abode in that city about 1884. Here he worked at 
his trade until 1891, when he engaged in business on his own account, forming a 
partnership with his brother, Patrick H. They began plastering contracting under 
the firm: style of McXulty Brothers, at Chicago, Illinois. Their line has been 
plastering. They now have additional offices in Pittsburgh, Cleveland and Detroit. 
The following are a few buildings which they have plastered. In Chicago: Mar- 
shall Field & Company's store buildings, Illinois Trust & Savings Bank building, 
Merchants Loan & Trust Bank building, Corn Exchange Bank building, Peoples 
Gas building. Railway Exchange building; in Pittsburgh: Frick building, Frick 
Arcade building, Oliver building. City & County buildings; in Cleveland: Statler 
Hotel, Citizens' Bank building, Winton Hotel, Hippodrome building, Power & 
Light building; in Detroit: Union Station, Dime Bank building, Whitney building, 
Book building. Municipal Court building. Elks Temple, Pontchartrain Hotel. 

This list indicates that they have but few equals and are superior in their line 
in tlie United States. 

Thomas J. McXulty is also interested in real estate and building operations^, 
and besides being president of McNulty Brothers Company he is president of the 
Wabash & Washington Trust, vice president of the City Hall Square Building Com- 
pany and a director of the Michigan Avenue Company, and the Hibernian Banking 
Association. 

On the 20th of November, 1889, Mr. McNulty was united in marriage in Chicago 
to Miss Josephine M. Davis, a daughter of William Davis, of this city, and to them 
were born twelve children, of whom two sons, Joseph D. and Thomas J., Jr., are 
associated with their father in business. The family reside at 627 Melrose street 
and they are communicants of the Catholic church, while Mr. McNulty is also 
identified with the Knights of Columbus. He is a member of the Employing 
Plasterers Association and the Building Construction Employers Association in the 
work of which he has been quite active. He is a member of the Engineers Club, 
the South Shore Country Club, the Illinois Athletic Club, the Chicago Athletic 
Club and the Edgewater Golf Club. Mr. McNulty is a man who commands the 
highest respect and confidence. It may be truthfully said of him that he has never 
lost the common touch. Great success and accumulated power have not dulled his 
perceptions of what is right. His entire career has been marked by a notable ad- 
vancement and sustained achievement that place him among the leaders in the field 
of industrial activity in the city. 



ROBERT WRIGHT STEWART. 

Among those men who in the space of a comparatively brief career have attained 
an eminent position in the legal profession is Robert W. Stewart, general attorney 
for the Standard Oil Company, at Chicago. Mr. Stewart was born at Cedar 
Rapids, Iowa, March 11, 1866, a son of William and Eliza Mills (Lucore) 
Stewart. The former was a native of Mercer, Pennsylvania, and the latter of 
Portage, New York. The Stewarts, who were of Scotch-Irish ancestry, are num- 
bered amons: the oldest families of Pennsvlvania. William Stewart, the great- 
grandfather of Robert W., was a lieutenant in the Revolutionary war, and was 



148 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

given a land grant in Mercer county, Pennsylvania, in consideration of the dis- 
tinguished services he rendered. About 1843, William Stewart, the father of our 
subject, came west, working his passage part of the way on an Ohio river steamer. 
He located at Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and subsequently purchased a farm near that 
city, where he resided until his death in 1893. He acquired a comfortable fortune 
and spent the winters of his declining years in California. His widow still sur- 
vives and resides at San Diego, California, where she has erected a beautiful home. 
They were the parents of seven children, of whom three are living: George W. 
Stewart, a farmer residing near Cedar Rapids, Iowa ; Eliza B., wafe of Clarke W. 
McKee, attorney at law, of San Diego, California; and Robert W., the subject of 
this sketch. 

Robert W. Stewart received his early education in the public schools of Cedar 
Rapids, graduating from the high school in 1883. He took his A. B. from Coe Col- 
lege in 1886, completing the four years' literary course in three years, and two 
years later graduated from the law department of Yale University with the degree 
of LL. B. He was admitted to the bar at New Haven, Connecticut, in 1888. In 
1888 and 1889 he held the position of managing clerk in the law office of Judge 
William K. Townsend and George D. Watrous, at the same time filling a tutorship 
at Yale Law School from which he won the Townsend prize. In the latter 
year Mr. Stewart removed to Pierre, South Dakota, and there engaged in the 
practice of law as a member of the firm of Horner & Stewart until 1905. He 
was then made general attorney for the Chicago & North Western Railway for 
the states of North and South Dakota, and also general attorney in the northwest 
for the Standard Oil and International Harvester Companies, and took up his 
residence at Huron. Two years later he received the ajipointment of general attor- 
ney for the Standard Oil Company at Chicago and in July, 1907, removed to this 
city. . 

From the very beginning of his career Mr. Stewart has risen rapidly and sub- 
stantially until today he stands near the head of his profession. No higher com- 
pliment could be paid to his legal ability than the recognition accorded him by such 
corporations, and few men attain sucli professional eminence ^dthin so brief a period. 
And no less are the honors that have been thrust upon him in public life. He was 
elected state's attorney for Hughes county. South Dakota, in 1893, and in 1894 
was appointed state supreme court reporter, which office he held until May, 1898. 
In 1899 he was elected to the state senate from Hughes, Hyde and Sully counties 
and reelected in 1901, serving two terms. From 1895 to 1907 he was a member 
of the executive council of the republican state central committee of South Dakota. 
Mr. Stewart was also very active in military affairs during his residence in the 
northwest. In the spring of 1898 he became captain of Grigsby's Rough Riders, 
Third United States Volunteer Cavalry, and served during the Spanish-American 
war, being promoted to major of the second squadron. Returning home he was 
made colonel of the First Regiment of the South Dakota National Guard, which 
office he held until leaving the state in 1907. 

Mr. Stewart is a high Mason, being a Knight Templar and Shriner, and is also 
a member of the Knights of Pythias and the Elks. His social affiliations are with 
the University, Union, Yale, Chicago Golf, Glen View Country and South Shore 
Country Clubs, and his chief recreations are golf and motoring. 

At Aberdeen, South Dakota, July 14, 1907, Mr. Stewart was uuitcd in mar- 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 149 

riage with Miss Maude Elliott, of that place, a native of Kentucky. They have 
one child, Donald Stewart, born November 16, 1907. Their residence is at 103 
Bellevue Place. 



NELS B. WOLD. 



Nels B. Wold is engaged in the undertaking business in Chicago, with which he 
has been identified from early manhood, and in this connection he is widely and 
favorably known, being a partner in the firm of Wold & Wold. He was born in 
Chicago on the 10th of March, 1876, and is a son of Berent and Josephine (Hanson) 
Wold, both of whom were natives of Bergen, Norway. The father was a steward 
on the first ship that came direct from Bergen, Norway, to Chicago. He arrived in 
this city when eighteen years of age and remained here to the time of his death, 
which occurred in August, 1906. He began work at the docks and later was em- 
ployed at his trade of cabinet making. In 1867 he entered the undertaking busi- 
ness and in this connection made his own caskets. As the years passed he developed 
a business of considerable proportions and became one of the foremost undertakers 
of the city. His wife died in the year 1877. 

Nels B. Wold, whose name introduces this review, obtained a public school 
education in Chicago and also studied for three years in Bergen, Norway, going to 
the home of his ancestors to complete his course. Upon his return to America he 
entered business in connection with his father and in 1899 his cousin, Alfred N. 
Wold, became identified with him in the business, at which time they bought out 
Mr. Wolf. The firm of Wold & Wold was established in 1895, succeeding to the 
business of Wold & Wolf, which had been established by Berent Wold in 1867. 
After conducting the business alone for a time Mr. Wold had admitted a partner, 
Mr. Larson, and later his business associate was Mr. Eck. He had begun business 
on Chicago avenue, near the river, but later made a removal to Grand avenue, 
opening his store between Sangamon and Morgan streets. In time the firm of 
Wold & Wolf was formed and, as previously indicated, Mr. Wolf's interest was 
ultimately purchased by Nels B. Wold and his cousin, Alfred Wold, and the asso- 
ciation between these two was maintained until the death of Alfred Wold in Feb- 
ruary, 1911. At that time Nels B. Wold purchased the interest of his cousin's 
widow and has conducted the business alone since that time. In 1906 the business 
was removed from Grand avenue to 2709 West North avenue and in February, 
1917, a new location was secured at No. 3337 West North avenue, where a new 
building was erected with a fifty foot frontage. The building is one story in height 
and one hundred and twenty feet in depth. Mr. Wold utilizes the entire building 
for the conduct of his business. He has a chapel with a seating capacity of two 
hundred and his establishment is splendidly equipped. He owns an auto livery 
and hearse and by reason of his able and careful management of his interests and 
his tactful direction of funerals he has secured a liberal patronage. He has a branch 
at No. 4112 Armitage avenue, which was established in 1910, and he there occupies 
a building with a twenty-five foot frontage. 

In 1901 Mr. Wold was united in marriage to Miss Marion Wingard, of Chicago, 
a daughter of Frederick and Mary Wingard. In fraternal relations he is widely 



150 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

known. He has membership in Siloam Lodge, No. 780, A. F. &. A. M., and he 
has attained the thirtj^-second degree of the Scottish Rite as a member of the 
Oriental Consistory. He also belongs to Medinah Temple of the Mystic Shrine. 
He is connected with the Knights of Pythias and he belongs to the Norwegian Club. 
His religious faith is that of the Congregational church and his political allegiance 
is given to the rei^ublican party. He belongs to the Chicago Undertakers Association, 
with which he has been identified for many years, and he is also a member of the 
Chicago Motor Liverymen's Association. He has many sterling qualities which 
have won him high regard wherever he is known, and as the circle of his acquaintance 
has broadened, the circle of his friends has also widened, and all who know him 
speak of him in terms of admiration and respect. 



FREDERICK D. COUNTISS. 

Frederick D. Countiss, Chicago manager and member of the well known house 
of S. B. Chapin & Company, brokers and dealers in investment securities in New 
York and Chicago, has for nearly a quarter of a century been identified with the 
financial life of the western metropolis. While yet a comparatively young man he 
has had broad experience and has attained a high position in financial circles. 
iHe is a native Chicagoan, born June 26, 1872, and comes from one of the old 
families of this city whose identification dates back nearly sixty-five years. His 
father, Robert H. Countiss, was a native of Wilmington, Delaware, while his 
mother, Mrs. Louise (Eakin) Countiss, was a native of Utica, New York. The 
ancestry of the Countiss family, originally from Wales, can be traced back to 
1709 and on coming to America representatives of the name settled in North 
Carolina. The Eakin family is one of Scotch-Irish extraction, coming from the 
north of Ireland and settling in Utica, New York. Several of its members served 
with honor and distinction in the English army. 

Robert H. Countiss, then a young man, came to Chicago in 1848 and for many 
years was prominently identified with the retail and wholesale grocery trade of 
this city. At one time he conducted several retail stores as well as a wholesale 
house. He was married in 1850 and lived at the southwest corner of Clark and 
Van Buren streets. Later he removed to Sixteenth and State streets. In the great 
conflagration of 1871 he suffered a heavy financial loss, his business being prac- 
tically destroyed. He was one of the organizers of the Chicago Board of Trade 
and also dealt extensively in real estate. He took an active part in the business 
and social life of the city and enjoyed a wide acquaintance with the leading men 
of Chicago, among his personal friends being Potter Palmer, Frank Parraelee, 
J. Irving Pierce and many others of the leading men of that time. Robert H. 
Countiss lived to see Chicago grow from a population of less than twenty thousand 
to two millions. His death occurred in 1901 while his wife had passed away 
February 12, 1898. They were the parents of nine children, seven of whom are 
now living: Robert H., Jr., who is chairman of the Trans-Continental Freight 
Rate Association; Charles H., who is contracting freight agent for the Michigan 
Central Railroad; William P., who is connected with the Trans-Continental Freight 
Rate Association; Anna N., now Mrs. Augustus W. Green, of Chicago; May,. 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 151 

the wife of Louis E. Howard, of Chicago; Claribel, now Mrs. Tracy L. Turner, 
of Chicago; and Frederick D. 

The last named was educated in the public schools of this city and early began 
his business career. After leaving school in 1889 he entered the employ of the 
Merchants Bank, beginning in a most modest capacity. He remained with that 
institution until 1892, when he accepted a position as bookkeeper with the National 
Bank of the Republic, wherein he later became receiving teller. He continued 
with that bank until 1896, when he entered the employ of Chapin & Gaylord,, 
brokers. In July, 1898, he was admitted to the firm whose name remained un- 
changed until 1901, when upon Mr. Gaylord's retirement 'it became S. B. Chapin 
& Company. This firm occupies a foremost position among the leading houses of 
this kind in Chicago and serves a very high-class clientele. In June, 1909, Mr. 
Countiss was elected president of the Chicago Stock Exchange and was reelected 
in 1910 but declined a third term. He is a member of the New York Stock 
Exchange, the New York Cotton Exchange, and the Chicago Board of Trade. He 
is likewise a member of the Chicago Club, Union League Club, Mid-Day Club, 
Bankers Club and Chicago Athletic Association, and is a director of the Lake 
Geneva Country Club, commodore of the Lake Geneva Yacht Club and a member 
of other yacht clubs of Chicago and New York. 

On the 10th of September, 1910, Mr. Countiss was married to Miss Eleanor 
Robinson, of New York, a daughter of the late John Kelly Robinson, one of the 
founders and for thirty-three years the treasurer of the Diamond Match Company. 
The city residence of Mr. Countiss is at No. 2922 Michigan avenue and his sum- 
mer home is at Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. 



LAFAYETTE C. BALL. 



Lafayette C. Ball is one of the best known undertakers of Chicago and is the 
inventor of an embalming fluid of the greatest worth to the profession. Moreover, 
he has conducted an extensive business as embalmer to the trade. A native of In- 
diana, he was born in Laporte on the 17th of May, 1863, and is a son of Thomas L. 
and Cornelia R. (Landon,) Ball. The father was born in Liberty, Ohio, while the 
mother was a native of Kalamazoo, Michigan. Thomas L. Ball was a son of 
Willard N. Ball, who removed to Laporte, Indiana, in 1831 and built the first court- 
house there. He also entered the undertaking business at Laporte in the year of 
his arrival there and continued active in that field of labor throughout his remaining 
days. His sons, Thomas L. and the latter's brother, continued the undertaking 
business established by their father at Laporte. At the time of the Civil war 
Thomas L. Ball responded to the country's call for aid and served throughout the 
period of hostilities between the north and the south, participating in a number of 
engagements and rendering valuable aid to the Union cause. He was one of the 
charter members of the Masonic lodge at Laporte and exemplified in his life the 
beneficent si>irit of the craft. 

Lafayette C. Ball began his education in the public schools of Laporte and after 
his textbooks were put aside entered the undertaking business in connection with 
his father. He did his first embalming on the 2d of February, 1878, following the 



152 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

arterial process and using a fluid originated by the father, still having in his pos- 
session the formula, which is in his father's handwriting. This formula calls for a 
gallon of alcohol, to which is added four ounces of chloride of zinc and three or 
four ounces of corrosive sublimate. On the second day afterward three or four ounces 
of hydrate of chloral are added, with thirteen ounces of saltpetre water for arterial 
use. This fluid was used arterially in 1878 by Mr. Ball of this review, who was 
one of the first embalmers to adopt the arterial process. In 1886 he came to Chi- 
cago, where he entered the employ of M. W. Bonfield, the first jiresident of the 
Chicago Undertakers Association. He afterward worked for others, including James 
C. Gavin and other well known undertakers of the city. He did embalming for 
the trade from 1898 until 1911 and on the 16th of June of the latter year he pur- 
chased the undertaking establishment of Harry M. Rolson, which was then on 
Wabash avenue, and removed the business to No. 426 South Dearborn street. Dur- 
ing the Iroquois fire he worked four days and nights without sleep, embalming 
sixty-eight bodies at that time, and he has handled the dead to the number of over 
one hundred thousand. As embalmer for the trade he has had thousands of most 
dangerous and difficult cases. In those cases where decomposition is in its last 
stages his work has resulted in not only checking this decomposition but in restoring 
a sweet and clean condition in ten minutes by the use of the embalming fluid which 
I\Ir. Ball has invented. He belongs to the Chicago Undertakers Association and 
there is perhaps no one better known to the profession in Chicago than he. His 
business has reached extensive proportions and he has concentrated almost his 
entire time and attention upon it, joining no lodges or clubs. He is, however, a 
man of social nature and greatly appreciates the warm friendships which he has 
formed. 



EUGENE S. PIKE. 



Eugene S. Pike, one of Chicago's representative citizens and business men, has 
for more than fortv-five years been prominently identified with the growth and 
(development of this city. He was born in Lake county, Ohio, October 5, 1835, 
and is the son of Dan Harmon and Jerusha (Hartwell) Pike. He was a mere lad 
of eight years when his father died. He acquired his education by attending school 
in the winter seasons, while in the summer months he worked on the home farm. 
Thus early in life he started to improve the golden moments of opportunity and, 
ambitious for an education, he worked his way through the Western Reserve Col- 
lege at Hiram, Ohio, where he was a student for two years, and through Antioch 
College, where he finished his education. While in the former institution he was 
a classmate of President James A. Garfield and a strong friendship between the 
two was the result of their class comradeship. 

In 1885 Mr. Pike was married to Miss Mary Rockwell, of Painesville, Ohio, 
and by this union there were born three sons, Eugene R., Charles Burrall and 
William W. Pike. 

Soon after leaving Antioch College Mr. Pike entered business life, becoming 
a dealer in nursery stock, and, rapidly availing himself of ojjportunity, he soon 
branched out in business and became an importer from France of fruit trees, grape- 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 153 

vines, roses, etc. In this line he worked up to a splendid and thriving business, 
having a large amount of trade in the south until the outbreak of the Civil war 
in 1861. He then turned his attention to the banking and brokerage business in 
Painesville, Ohio, and followed it for about five or six years, when, in 1867, he 
removed to Chicago. Soon after his arrival in this city his foresight and business 
judgment suggested to him the opportunity for investment in real estate. This 
marked the beginning of his identification with that line of business in which he 
has continued until the present time. Mr. Pike became interested in the south-side 
business district and as his resources increased he erected business blocks upon 
this i^roperty, and devoted himself almost exclusively to handling business property, 
and for many years has been regarded as one of the best judges of such values in 
the city. 

Mr. Pike, in 1906, erected the Mentor building, on the northeast corner of 
State and Monroe streets, which, in addition to being one of the best arranged 
business blocks in the city, is the center of the retail trade district on State street. 

Mr, Pike's interests while extensive in real-estate lines, were by no means con- 
fined thereto. He is a director of the First National Bank, a trustee of the Home 
for Incurables and the Presbyterian Hospital and was a director of the World's 
Columbian Exposition. His social connections are with the Chicago, South Shore 
Country, Mid-Day and Onwentsia Clubs and the Chicago Historical Society. He 
is a republican in his j^olitical views and is of the Presbyterian faith. 

Though essentially a business man, Mr. Pike has always taken a deep interest 
in intellectual pursuits and has done much to build up Chicago in a practical and 
substantial "way, being always willing to lend a helping hand where his aid is 
needed. His business life has been an eminently successful one and is an illus- 
tration of the fact that honest endeavor and clean business principles can win 
fortune even though the start is a very modest one. Through his years of faithful 
work he has always followed the most commendable principles and those who have 
known Mr. Pike both in his social and business life regard him as a man of high 
moral and business standing. It is such lives as his that have made the city better, 
his activity in the real-estate and financial field contributing to the business 
activity and consequent prosperity of Chicago, while his influence has been a potent 
factor for progress along intellectual and moral lines. 

Mr. Pike's residence for many vears has been at what is now 2101 Prairie avenue. 



HUGO E. OTTE. 



The history of the world chronicles no record like unto that of Chicago. With 
no municipal existence about three quarters of a century ago, in the intervening 
years the city has forged ahead in every line — its growth one of the marvels of 
the world. Its banking interests have largely constituted the basis of its ui^build- 
ing. The banking institution wherein progressiveness and conservatism are well 
balanced forces does more, perhaps, than any one element in promoting substantial 
growth and progress. It is to this field that Hugo E. Otte has directed his prac- 
tical activities, his name being long an honored one in financial circles. In the 
exercise of duties calling for unusual ability and endeavor he has proved master- 



154 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

ful and resourceful and has thus added to the development of the city of his birth. 
He was born May 30, 1872, and is a son of Emil and Catherine (Behrman) Otte. 
The jDublic schools afforded him his educational privileges and he entered into 
active connection with banking interests as an employe of the Union National Bank 
of Chicago in 1887. There he remained until the consolidation of that institution 
with the First National Bank of Chicago in 1900. He was the initiative spirit 
in the organization of the Union Stock Yards State Bank in 190i and became its 
cashier, while in 1905 he organiezd the Lake View Trust & Savings Bank of 
Chicago, being elected to its presidency. Upon the organization of the National 
City Bank he was chosen its cashier and two years later was elected vice president, 
which office he has held to the present time. He is likewise a director of that insti- 
tution and of the People's Stock Yards State Bank and of the Lake View Trust 
& Savings Bank. He has displayed much of the spirit of the initiative in formu- 
lating plans which have led to the establishment and development of some of the 
strong moneyed concerns of this city. 

On the 9th of June, 1893, in Chicago, Mr. Otte was married to Miss Annetta 
Christian, and unto them have been born two sons, Howard Allan and Milton 
Harvey. Mr. Otte is a man of social nature who finds pleasure in his membership in 
the Masonic fraternity, the Mid-Day Club, the Illinois Athletic Club, the Hamil- 
ton Club and the Beverly Countrv Club. He is never too busv to be cordial and 
courteous — nor too cordial and courteous to be busy. His friends find him an enter- 
taining companion and one interested in all the vital questions of the day. But 
through the hours of business his attention is concentrated upon the problems of 
banking for which his long experience enables him to find ready solution. His 
training was thorough and he has ever made a close study of business conditions and 
values, so that he knows where to place credit, where to practice retrenchment and 
where to promote the interests of the bank in an extensive policy that broadens 
the scope of its activities and promotes its success. In his life record he has kept 
pace with the high standard of business activity that has brought Chicago to its 
present position as the second city of the Union. 



JOHN B. RYAN. 



John B. Ryan is not only well known in connection with the undertaking busi- 
ness, but has been as well a successful investor in property, and througli his indi- 
vidual effort, intelligently directed, has attained a place among the men of affluence. 
A native of Massachusetts, Mr. Ryan was born in Lawrence on the 24th of January, 
1862, and is a son of Patrick and Kathryn (Shackleton) Ryan, botli of whom 
remained residents of ^Massachusetts until called to their final rest, tlie father 
having there followed the machinist's trade. 

John B. Ryan acquired a public school education in the east and in August, 
1882, when a young man of twenty years, removed westward to Chicago, thinking 
that he might find better business opportunities in this section of the country. He 
became connected with the fire department of the city and thus served until 1892, or 
for a period of ten years. He then entered the contracting business, in which he 
was engaged until about 1899, and in that year he was elected clerk of the South 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 155 

Town of Chicago. His identification with the undertaking business dates from 
1900, in which year he bought out the Ellsworth interests on West Madison street. 
There he remained until 1901, when he removed to No. 2i49 Cottage Grove avenue, 
where he has since maintained his establishment. He has in the interval purchased 
the building which he occupies and he has also made other investments in real 
estate, becoming the owner of three other buildings, from which he derives a very 
gratifying annual rental. His investments have been judiciously placed and add 
considerably to his income. 

On the 20th of January, 1895, Mr. Ryan was united on marriage to Miss Annie 
Ryan, of Chicago, a daughter of John and Margaret Ryan. They became the 
parents of two children, but both died in infancy. In politics Mr. Ryan is a stal- 
wart democrat and has been very active in political circles, serving on the dem- 
ocratic central committee for twenty-six years. Fraternally he is connected with 
the Woodmen of the World and the Knights of Columbus, the latter indicating his 
allegiance to the Catholic faith, his membership being in St. James church. 



ALFRED L. BAKER. 



Alfred L. Baker, engaged in the banking and brokerage business as senior part- 
ner of the firm of Alfred L. Baker & Company, stocks, bonds and grain, was born 
in Massachusetts, April 30, 1859, and is a son of Addison and Maria (Mudge) 
Baker both of whom were natives of Boston, Massachusetts. The father was 
engaged in the wholesale canning business in Boston, but died at a comparatively 
early age, and the mother has also passed away. The thorough public-school sys- 
tem for which Massachusetts is noted provided Alfred L. Baker his educational 
privileges. He completed a course in the Lj'nn high school and then, entering upon 
the study of law, was admitted to the bar of Essex county in 1881, when twenty-two 
years of age. Opening an office in Lynn, Massachusetts, he practiced under the firm 
name of Baldwin & Baker for three j-ears, or until the fall of 1885, and was also 
active in the public life of the community, serving as a member of the city council 
and also as a member of the school board. In comparison of the conservative east 
with the more progressive west he decided in favor of the latter as a place of loca- 
tion and in the fall of 1885 came to Chicago, where he jDracticed law under the firm 
name of Baker & Greeley until 1896. His success in the profession brought to 
him not only substantial returns but also a wide acquaintance until he felt justi- 
fied in engaging in the banking business, believing that this field of enterprise 
afforded larger financial possibilities than the practice of law. Under the name of 
Alfred L. Baker & Company he has since conducted a brokerage business in stocks, 
bonds and grains. He is a member of the New York Stock Exchange, the Board of 
Trade and the Chicago Stock Exchange and of the last named was president for 
three years, from 1898 until 1900 inclusive. His cooperation has been sought in 
other fields and he has become an active factor in the successful control of a num- 
ber of important financial and business concerns, being now the vice president of 
the National City Bank of Chicago and vice president of the Chicago & Calumet 
Dock Company. He has also figured prominently in the management of affairs of 
a semi-public character, being president of the Merchants Club in 1905, president 



156 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

of the board of trustees of Lake Forest University in 1907 and 1908 and president 
of the Onwentsia Club from 1902 until 1907. He was also governor of the Society 
of Colonial Wars and is a member of the Descendants of the Mayflower, which 
indicates his connection with New England ancestry long established in America. 
Mr. Baker was married in Chicago, on the 6th of June, 1894, to Miss Mary 
Corwith, a daughter of Henry Corwith, of Chicago, and they have two children: 
Isabelle, born in 1897; and Mary Landon, born in 1901. The residence of the 
family is in Lake Forest and the members of the household are prominent in the 
social circles of that beautiful lake-shore suburb as well as of Chicago. 



JOHN J. MINES. 



For more than twenty-seven years John J. Mines has been connected with the 
undertaking business in Chicago. His life's experiences have been broad and 
varied, for business interests have taken him to many sections of the country. He is 
a native son of Illinois, his birth having occurred in Waukegan on the 13th of April, 
1856, his parents being John and Elizabeth (McClory) Mines, the former a native 
of Ireland, while the latter was born in Canada. They became early residents of 
Waukegan, where they resided until 1862, when they removed with their family to 
Chicago. The father was engaged in the grocery business for many years, his loca- 
tion being on Archer avenue, near Deering street. He continued to conduct his 
grocery store there to the time of his demise. 

John J. Mines was accorded the opportunitj' of attending the parochial and 
public schools of Chicago, to which city he was taken by his parents when a little 
lad of but six summers. After his textbooks were put aside he learned the horse- 
shoeing trade, which he followed for three years. About 1873 the epizootic became 
prevalent among horses and many thousands of them died, oxen being used in place 
of horses in Chicago. Mr. Mines was receiving five dollars per week while learning 
the horseshoeing business and he was offered two dollars and a quarter per day 
by the Nelson Morris packing house. He accepted the proffered position and there 
remained for a year. On the expiration of that period he purchased a team and 
engaged in the teaming business for two years, at the end of which time he went 
west to Colorado in 1880 and there followed mining for ten years. It was while he 
was Avorking in the mines there that a fellow miner was killed. It was necessary 
that some one should carry him out and this Mr. ]\Iines did, carrying out the work- 
man to the surface — sixty feet up. He says this was his first experience in the 
imdertaking business. In 1888 he yvas himself injured in a mine, working at the 
time in the Copper Queen mine at Bisbee, Arizona. His injury Mas such that he 
was unable to continue work of that character and he returned to Chicago in April, 
1890. In the same year he entered into the undertaking business in connection with 
his two brothers on Archer avenue and the partnership between them was main- 
tained for three years. In the spring of 1891 ]Mr. Mines of this review established 
an undertaking business independently on Fifty-fifth street, in Hyde Park, and has 
since remained on the same thoroughfare, his present location being at No. 1209 
East Fifty-fifth street. Through the intervening years he has developed a very sub- 
stantial business and now has one of the leading undertaking establishments of his 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 157 

section of the city. He belongs to the Chicago Undertakers Association and also to 
the Chicago Motor Liverymen's Association. 

In May, 1893, Mr. Mines was united in marriage to Miss Jennie Rudd, who 
was born at Lake Forest, Illinois, and they have become parents of two children: 
James A., who is a horseshoer and for the past two years has been connected with 
the Sixth United States Cavalry; and Helen, at home. 

The religious faith of the famil}^ is that of the Catholic church, their member- 
ship being in St. Thomas church. Mr. Mines is also identified with the Catholic 
Order of Foresters, the Indei^endent Order of Foresters, the Kniglits of The Mac- 
cabees, the North American Union and the Ancient Order of Hibernians. In 
politics he maintains an independent course, voting for men and measures rather 
than for party, and has never been an aspirant for office, preferring to concentrate 
his efforts and attention upon his business affairs, which have been wisely directed 
and have brought to him a substantial measure of success. 



SIDNEY SALOMON. 



One of the most progressive of the young business men of Chicago is Sidney 
Salomon, now vice president and general manager of The Independent Drug Com- 
pany. He possesses a spirit of initiative that has led to the advancement of many 
new and original ideas in connection with trade development. He is constantly on 
the alert for opportunities that will broaden the scope of his activities and his 
efforts are farreaching and resultant. A native son of Chicago, he was born No- 
vember 16, 1881, a son of Martin and Bertha Salomon, who came to this city about 
1868. The father conducted a barber shop in Chicago for a time. He is the 
brother of the late General Edward M. Salomon, a brigadier general of the Civil 
war and a pioneer of Chicago, who was later appointed governor of Washington 
Territory by President Grant. 

Sidney Salomon was reared and educated in this city. He early started out 
in life on his own account, however, and earned his own way when a boy. At the 
age of thirteen he became wagon boy for the firm of Mandel Brothers and later was 
employed in the shipping room, while subsequently he filled a position as stock 
boy. He was afterward advanced to a clerkship and eventually became assistant 
buyer. Thus step by step he worked his way upward and from each new experience 
he gained the lessons therein to be learned. He was afterward made buyer in dry 
goods lines and in 1900 became manager for the Leonard Mandel Dry Goods Com- 
pany. At a subsequent date he was assistant general manager with Sydney Mandel 
and in 1904 he became buyer for the house of Schlesinger & Meyer. As the years 
passed he thus became the associate of the foremost merchants of the city. He was 
next buyer for H. G. Selfridge and afterward became buyer for Carson Pirie Scott 
& Company. In February, 1906, he went to New York as buyer for the Siegel 
store of that city and he established a bargain basement for the firm of Simpson & 
Crawford of New York in 1907. In 1909 he became merchandise manager of their 
Fourteenth street store in New York and in 1910 he was made general manager of 
the Siegel interests in New York. On the 15th of June, 1913, he came to Chicago 
as merchandise manager for Siegel Cooper & Company, with whom he remained 



158 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

until the 1st of February ;, 1916, when he was elected vice president and made 
general manager of The Independent Drug Company, Since that time he has 
instituted many most progressive methods, including wide advertising, the intro- 
duction of other lines of goods and managers' meetings. The company has a chain 
of eleven stores and on each Thursday morning a managers' meeting is held where 
questions relative to the trade are discussed and problems solved. Mr. Salomon 
is acquainted with every j^hase of the business and during his two years' connection 
therewith has greatly advanced the interests of the house. 

On the 4th of September, 1905, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Salomon 
and Miss Mollie Jesselson, of Chicago, and to them have been born three children. 
Myrtle, Sarah and Sidney. Fraternally Mr. Salomon is connected with Loyalty 
Lodge, No. 876, A. F. & A. M., of New York, and he has membership in Rhamah 
No. 33, of B'nai B'rith, of Chicago. He is also connected with the Covenant Club 
of Chicago, the Kimroch Athletic Association and is independent in politics. His 
lias been a most active and useful career, fruitful of good results, and his record 
illustrates what may be accomplished by individual j^uri^ose and indefatigable energy 
when guided by sound judgment. 



DANIEL B. QUINLAN. 



Daniel B. Quinlan, who for a third of a century has been engaged in the under- 
taking business in Chicago, is well acquainted in the profession throughout the 
United States and has been a prominent figure in the conventions held by those 
engaged in the same line of business. He was born in Kane county, Illinois, 
November 26, 1851, and is a son of Daniel and Julia (Gleeson) Quinlan, both of 
whom were natives of Ireland. In young manhood the father crossed the Atlantic 
and established his home in New Haven, Connecticut, where he conducted a general 
store. He was married there and in 1840 removed westward to Illinois. He followed 
the occujDation of farming in Kane county for a time but in 1861 removed to Chicago 
and in later j^ears retired from active business life. 

Daniel B. Quinlan was a little lad of but ten summers when his parents took 
up their abode in Chicago, where he acquired a public school education. In 1867, 
when a youth of sixteen years, he became employed in connection with railway inter- 
ests, remaining in the train service until 1872. He afterward traveled for the Chicago, 
Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company as traveling passenger agent throughout the 
west and a year and a half later he became Chicago city passenger agent for the 
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy. In 1880 he was made traveling passenger agent for 
the Union Pacific Railway Company and thus continued until 1881, when he turned 
his attention to the business in which he has since been engaged, opening an under- 
taking establishment at No. 3119 South State street. In 1897 he erected a large 
four story building with a frontage of fifty feet and he now has two buildings for 
the conduct of his business. There is a commodious and well appointed chapel and 
he carries an extensive line of undertaking goods of all descriptions. He maintains 
a large garage, using automobiles in the conduct of funerals, and he was one of the 
pioneers to inaugurate the use of motor cars. Mr. Quinlan has been a member of 
the Undertakers Association throughout the entire period of his connection with the 




DANIEL B. Ql'INLAN 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOK. I.ENOX AM) 
T.'LDt.V FDLMiAT .AS 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 161 

business. In 1902 he served as president of the State Undertakers Association and 
for many years was a member of its executive board. He also served for an extended 
period as chairman of the executive board of the City Association. While president 
of the State Association he was instrumental in having introduced into the state 
legislature a bill providing that undertakers should pass an examination in anatomy, 
sanitary science, embalming and disinfecting. His bill successfully passed the general 
assembly and was the first legislation of the kind to be adopted in the United 
States. It is of great protection to the people from a health standpoint. Mr. 
Quinlan was also made a member of the board to consider the amendment of the 
laws regarding undertaking in 1916 and he has taken a very helpful and active 
part in jDromoting city ordinances having to do with the care of the dead. In 1916 he 
was elected president of the National Funeral Directors Association of the United 
States and presided at its meeting held in Jamestown, Virginia, in 1907. He has 
served as chairman of its transportation committee for the past ten years and has 
done important work for transportation in connection with professional interests. 
Moreover, as chairman of the transportation committee he has arranged all trans- 
portation matters for most of the big conventions which have been held by the 
National Association. In a word, Mr. Quinlan has done much to build up the 
profession not only in Chicago but throughout the entire country. 

On the 29th of September, 1881, occurred the marriage of Mr. Quinlan and 
Miss Katherine C. Lenehan, of Dubuque, Iowa, a daughter of B. C. Lenehan, a 
prominent business man. Mrs. Quinlan passed away November 14, 1903. 

Mr. Quinlan is identified with several fraternal organizations. He is a prominent 
member of the Knights of Columbus, of the Catholic Order of Foresters, the Hiber- 
nians and the National Union. He was president of the board of directors that 
erected the Knights of Columbus building on Sixty-second street and Cottage Grove 
avenue and he served as chief ranger of the Foresters of St. James Court for seven 
years. His religious belief is indicated in his membership in the Corpus Christi 
Catholic church. In politics he is a democrat where national questions and issues are 
involved but otherwise casts an independent ballot according to the dictates of his 
judgment and the exigencies of the case. He is a progressive business man and a 
substantial citizen, highly respected throughout Chicago, where he has a very wide 
acquaintance, and also greatly esteemed in other sections of the country where he is 
known. 



TRACY C. DRAKE. 



Tracy Corey Drake, president of The Drake Hotel Company, owners and • 
operators of The Blackstone of Chicago, and one of the leading hotel men of the 
United States, was born September 12, 1864, in Chicago, Illinois. His father, the 
late John B. Drake, was for many years one of Chicago's most successful and rep- 
resentative citizens, and one of the most popular hotel proprietors of his day. The 
elder Drake was of English ancestry and in the hotel business from boyhood. The 
Drakes settled in New Jersey in the eighteenth century and there John Drake, 
father of John B., was born in 1800, later moving to Lebanon. Ohio, where John 
B. Drake was born and had his first hotel experiences. From there he moved to 



Vol. IV— 9 



162 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

Cincinnati, and connected himself with the Burnet House as clerk. In 1855 he 
accepted a jDosition as steward of the Tremont House in Chicago, at that time the 
leading hotel of the city. Being thrifty and saving, he was soon enabled to pur- 
chase an interest in this hotel, and before many years became an associate pro- 
prietor, and afterwards sole proprietor. This hotel was burned in the great fire 
in 1871, and while this fire was raging, Mr. Drake made a deal by which he took 
possession of the Michigan Avenue Hotel on the site where the Congress Hotel now 
stands, which he kept for two years afterwards. In 1874 he purchased the lease 
of the famous old Grand Pacific Hotel of Chicago, and was its leading proprietor 
until his death in 1895. On his mother's side, Tracy C. Drake is of English ances- 
try also, the family settling in Sturbridge, Massachusetts, and later at Madison,, 
Indiana, where his mother, Josephine C. Corey, was born. 

Tracy C. Drake had the advantage of an excellent education; after passing 
through the ordinary common schools, he attended Allen's Academy in Chicago, a 
famous institution of learning, and was later a student at the Vermont Episcopal 
Institute at Burlington, Vermont. Afterwards, for three years, he attended the 
Trinity Military Academy at Tivoli-on-the-Hudson, New York, and later the Rens- 
selaer Polytechnic Institute at Troy, where he graduated with the degree of B. S. 
in 1886. In the fall of the same year, he entered the employ of his father at the 
old Grand Pacific Hotel, as a clerk in the store room, and worked his way through 
the various positions of a practical hotel man, finally being appointed steward, and 
afterwards, beings admitted into partnership into the firm of Drake, Parker & Com- 
pany, the proprietors of the hotel, until it closed in 1895. He then spent two years 
in traveling abroad in Europe and in the Orient, and upon his return to Chicago in 
1898, he entered the firm of Alfred L. Baker & Company, bankers and brokers, 
with which he was identified for about two years, withdrawing in order to manage 
the affairs of his father's estate. He spent several winters in Pasadena, California, 
from 1902 to 1906, where he had some valuable interests. 

In 1907, Mr. Drake conceived the idea of The Blackstone, and at once set to 
work perfecting plans for its development, being joined in the enterprise by his 
brother, John B. Drake. Early in 1908 they obtained an eight months' option on 
the ground at the corner of Michigan boulevard and Hubbard place, where the hotel 
now stands, and the result of their combined efforts and practical knowledge of the 
hotel business is the completion and operation of one of the most magnificent hotels 
in the world. They organized The Drake Hotel Company, of which Tracy C. 
Drake is president, and his brother vice president. They, with their family, 
control the comjDany, which has a lease on the property for one hundred and forty- 
four years. 

In 1909 Mr. Drake and his brother organized a subsidiary corporation, The 
Blackstone Company, of which he is also president, and which leased the northeast 
corner of Wabash avenue and Hubbard place for one hundred and forty-three 
years, on which the new, magnificent Blackstone Theater was opened in December, 
1910. Provision has been made for the extension of the Blackstone hotel on the 
west jjortion of the lot, connection between the buildings being made by bridges 
and tunnels. For the present, the west lot is used as a dormitory for the hotel 
employes. 

Mr. Drake is a life member of the Chicago Athletic Association, and a mem- 
ber of the Chicago Club, Lake Geneva Country Club, and of the Delta Kappa 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 163 

Epsilon fraternity. He was married January 12, 1893, to Miss Annie C. Daughaday 
of St. Louis, Missouri, and they have two children, Carlos Corey Drake, born in 
1900, and Francis Augustus Drake, born in 1906. Mr. Drake has a beautiful coun- 
try home on the south shore of Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. 



JOHN F. KENNY. 



John F. Kenny, who for a number of years was actively engaged in the under- 
taking business in Chicago, was born in Meriden, Connecticut, in 1858, and his life 
record covered the intervening period to the year 1903, when death called him. He 
was a son of Hugh Kenny, who came to this city about 1859. John F. Kenny was 
therefore reared in Chicago and in early life he took up the butchering business, in 
which he became very efficient, so that he was appointed to the responsible position 
of superintendent with Armour & Comi^any. He continued to act in that capacity 
until he was elected alderman from the thirtieth ward, reelection continuing him in 
the office for three terms, during which he took an active interest in shaping laws and 
rulings having to do with the upbuilding of the city and the conduct of municipal 
interests. 

Mr. Kenny was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Halligan, who was born in 
Palos, Illinois, and who still survives her husband. They became the parents of ten 
children: Hugh L. ; Mrs. Elizabeth Kelly, a resident of Chicago; Daniel F., who is 
a member of the firm of Kenny Brothers, undertakers; Margaret, at home; John F., 
who is also a member of the firm of Kenny Brothers; Alice, who is likewise in the 
firm; William J., a member of the firm; Marie, who is at home; and two who died in 
infancy. 

John F. Kenny, whose name introduces this review, was a member of De La Salle 
Council of the Knights of Columbus, the Knights of The Maccabees, also of the 
Royal Arcanum and the Catholic Order of Foresters and the North American Union. 
He belonged to the Visitation Catholic church and among its membership he won 
many warm friends, while at all times he was loyal to the teacliings of the 
organization. 



HARRY R. WOLFE. 



Harry R. Wolfe, secretary and treasurer of The Independent Drug Company 
and a well known representative of commercial interests in Chicago, is a native of 
the city in which he still resides and is a brother of Aaron R. Wolff, who is the 
president of The Independent Drug Company. The brothers, however, have adopted 
different forms .of spelling the surname. They were sons of Isaac and Anna Wolff, 
whose family numbered nine children, namely : Barney, now deceased ; Joseph, who 
is a member of the police force ; Henry, who is with The Independent Drug Company ; 
Libby; Aaron R. ; Samuel, who is a live stock broker; Moses, who is also engaged in 
the live stock brokerage business; Tillie, the wife of B. Jesselson; and Harry R.^ 



164 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

of this review. All were reared in Chicago and the living are still residents of 
this city. 

Harry R. Wolfe was a youth of sixteen years Avhen, after having acquired a 
fair education in the public schools, he started out in the business world as an 
employe at the stock yards. He was with his brother in his early business career 
but later engaged in the live stock brokerage business on his own account about 
1901. He remained in that field of labor for a decade, or until the 1st of February, 
1911, when he became connected in an active way with The Independent Drug Com- 
pany, being, however, financially interested in its organization, and became secretary 
and treasurer and later the buyer of patent medicines. He has since concentrated 
his efforts and attention upon the conduct of the business, bending his energies to 
administrative direction and executive control. Through the intervening years the 
business has steadily and substantially grown and today the company has a chain 
of eleven stores, while its main establishment at No. 137 South State street is the 
largest retail drug store in the entire country, its volume of business exceeding that 
of any other individual establishment. 

On the 14th of June, 1911, Harry R. Wolfe was united in marriage to Miss 
Clara Jesselson, a native of Chicago, and to them have been born a son and a 
daughter, Victor and Muriel. Mr. Wolfe is an exemplary representative of the 
Masonic fraternity, belonging to Chicago Lodge, No. 437, A. F. & A. M. In 
politics he maintains an independent course, never seeking or desiring office, yet 
always interested in matters of progressive citizenship and cooperating in all well 
defined plans and measures for the general good. 



JOHN H. WALSH. 



John H. Walsh, a well known Chicago undertaker, was born in New York, March 
24, 1874, and is a son of Charles and Margaret (Welsh) Walsh, the former a native 
of Vermont, while the latter was born in Ireland but was brought to the United 
States during her early girlhood. The father was a contractor and church decorator 
and died in the j'ear 1892 but his widow still survives. 

John H. Walsh acquired a public school education in New York and also attended 
Manhattan College. He started out in the business world as a dealer in horses, but 
about 1900 became interested in tlie undertaking business in Greenwich, New York, 
after which he pursued a course in embalming under the direction of Professor 
Renaurd. Prior to this time, however, while attending school in New York he 
directed funerals under Mr. McGee, of the National Casket Company, and thus 
early his attention was directed to the line of activity in which he is now engaged. 
After pursuing his course in embalming he returned to Greenwich, New York, and 
became a member of the firm of Wilson & Walsh, who were proprietors of a furniture 
and undertaking establishment in that city for several years. In 1907 ]\Ir. Walsh left 
the Empire state and came to Chicago, where he entered the employ of the Western 
Casket Companj^, with whom he continued as branch manager for six years, being 
first located in charge of their branch at Sixty-fourth and Halsted streets and sub- 
sequently at One Hundred and Fourteenth street and Michigan avenue, remaining 
at that location for three years. He was ambitious, however, to engage in business 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 165 

on his own account and in 1904 he ojDened an undertaking establisliment at No. 2421 
West Sixty-third street, occupying a building with a frontage of thirty feet and of 
considerable depth. His chapel seats seventy-five people and he owns an automobile 
which is used in connection with the business. 

On the 25th of September, 1901, Mr. Walsh was united in marriage to Miss Helen 
Welsh, of New York, a daughter of William and Margaret (Fitzpatrick) Welsh. 
Mr. Walsh is identified with various fraternal organizations. He is dictator of Engle- 
wood Lodge, No. 221, Loyal Order of Moose, and is prominent in the ranks of the 
Knights of Columbus, having served as deputy grand knight in New York. He is 
interested in all that has to do with the welfare, upbuilding and progress of his city 
and is now serving as chairman of the executive board and as president of the South- 
west End Business Men's Association. He is also serving as clerk of Exemption 
Board, No. 68. He belongs to St. Rita's Catholic church, is its sexton, is active in 
various lines of church work and is identified with several church societies. His 
wife is on the executive committee of St. Rita's Progressive Club. In politics 
Mr. Walsh is also deeply and actively interested. He has ever given his political 
allegiance to the democratic party and is a past chairman of the democratic organ- 
ization of the twenty-ninth ward. He does everything in his power to advance 
democratic successes but in moments of national crisis like the present he believes 
in subordinating partisanship to the general good. 



EDWARD L. BREWSTER. 

Edward Lester Brewster, who was the founder and head of the well known 
banking and brokerage house of Edward L. Brewster & Company, was born at 
Brockport, Monroe county. New York, on June 22, 1842, and was a lineal descend- 
ant of Elder William Brewster, chief of the Pilgrims. His parents were Fred- 
erick William and Jeanette (Downs) Brewster, both natives of the Empire state. 
His paternal grandfather, Hon. Henry Brewster, was for many years a presiding 
judge in Genesee county. New York, and a man of distinction in the legal profes- 
sion. The boyhood of young Brewster was spent in his native place, where he 
attended the public schools and also a collegiate institute which flourished there at 
that time, where he obtained a good academic education. At the age of fifteen he 
became a clerk in a drj^-goods store but, after a year in that employment, he con- 
cluded to reach out for the better advantages offered in larger business centers. 
Thus at the age of sixteen he left his native village, and shortly after we find him 
occupying a good clerkship in the largest insurance agency in Buffalo. The two 
succeeding years that he spent in that city were years of much profit to him, for he 
not only acquired a good knowledge of business methods in the performance of his 
duties as clerk, but by utilizing his leisure hours supplemented the knowledge 
thus obtained with a course of study at a commercial college. So, well equipped 
in both practical and theoretical education, he found no difficulty in securing employ- 
ment on his arrival in Chicago in November, 1860. His first engagement was in 
the banking house of Edward I. Tinkham & Company, and from that day on Mr. 
Brewster was either directly or indirectly identified with the banking interests of 
Chicago. During the eight years following the discontinuance of the banking house 



166 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

of Edward I. Tinkham & Company, Mr. Brewster was variously employed, first 
as a money broker, next in the service of the Galena & Chicago Union Railroad 
Company, prior to its consolidation with the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad 
Company ; then as confidential clerk in a large wholesale grocery house and finally 
as clerk in the Third National Bank, where he remained two years. In January, 
1868, in connection with Samuel P. Farrington, Mr. Brewster established the 
wholesale grocery house of Farrington & Brewster, at the corner of Dearborn and 
South Water streets. This business was successfully carried on and, though heavy 
losers in the great fire of 1871, the firm paid every dollar of their obligations at 
maturity and continued their business as before. On July 1, 1872, Mr. Brewster 
retired from the firm to engage in a general banking and brokerage business, which, 
from his early training and his personal taste for financiering, he found more in 
the line of his ambitions than merchandising proved to be. He established the 
firm of Wrenn & Brewster on Wabash avenue, in the vicinity of Congress street, 
but in the spring of 1873 they removed their headquarters to 96 Washington street. 
This new venture proved profitable to Mr. Brewster, and greatly to his credit be 
it said that the firm successfully weathered the great financial panic of that year 
and remained in active existence until January, 1876. when it was dissolved. Mr. 
Brewster immediately opened a new oftice at 101 ^\'ashington street and alone 
continued in the same line of operations. His business grew rapidly and he soon 
found it necessary to establish himself in more commodious quarters, which he 
did at 104 Washington street. From this time on, Mr. Brewster grew in public 
favor as a judicious and thoroughly reliable financier. Prosperity came to him as 
a natural sequence, so that he was enabled to absorb the Chicago business of the 
house of Gwynne & Day of New York (successors to A. O. Slaughter,), bankers, 
in 1883. Charles C. Yoe, who had been a trusted employe of Mr. Brewster for a 
period of years, was now taken into partnership under the firm name of Edward 
L. Brewster & Company, which continued as such from that time on. They 
remained in the Grannis block, to which they had removed on the purchase of 
Gwynne & Day's business, until it was destroyed by fire on the evening of Febru- 
ary 19, 1885, when they took new oflices at the corner of Dearborn and Wash- 
ington streets. When the new Board of Trade building was completed, Mr. 
Brewster, recognizing the change of the business center, established a branch oftice 
by two private wires, thus securing means of instantaneous and absolutely private 
communications between the two offices. He was an influential member of tlie 
Board of Trade from 1873 and also of the New York Stock Exchange from 1881. 
He was one of the principal projectors and charter members of the Chicago Stock 
Exchange, which has now becpme one of the very important institutions of the city 
and is destined to exercise great influence in the monetary affairs and in the trans- 
actions in market securities of this country. Mr. Brewster was for many years 
a member of tlie governing committee and exercised an important influence in 
shaping the policy of the exchange and was at one time its president. He was a stock- 
holder in many of the large enterprises, banks and corjjorations in and about Chi- 
cago but uniformly declined a place in the directory of any, except the Chicago 
Edison Company. The stock of this company is owned by many of the wealthiest 
men in the city, and INIr. Brewster was elected one of its directors. This company 
controls all of the Edison electric patents for Cook county and is the largest 
electric-lighting corporation in the world, representing a capital of more than 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 167 

sixty million dollars. The offices of Edward L. Brewster & Company which were 
at the corner of Dearborn and Monroe streets, which they occupied for the first 
time on November 12, 1889, were perhaps the most complete in arrangements and 
the most elegant in appointments of any in the city ; and there, during the busy 
hours of the day, many of the wealthiest and most influential of Chicago's citizens 
were frequently in consultation with Mr. Brewster concerning their various inter- 
ests entrusted to his management in the monetary markets of the world. In 1891 
the offices were moved to the Home Insurance building but since 1900 have been 
maintained at their present location in the Merchants Loan and Trust building, 
where they have spacious and commodious quarters not excelled by any in the 
city. The members of the firm enjoy a world-wide reputation for honesty and 
straightforward business dealings and at the present time their clientage is one of 
the most extensive and highest class in Chicago. Mr. Brewster's reputation for 
honorable dealing and business sagacity brought to him the patronage and friend- 
ship of many of the wealthiest and most influential men in Chicago. Outside of 
his business cares he enjoyed the pleasure of social contact and his name was 
found in the membership of the Chicago Club, Calumet Club, Union Club and 
Washington Park Club and the Chicago Athletic Association. He was also a 
member of the Union League Club and the Metropolitan Club of New York city. 
Mr. Brewster has from time to time indulged in travel, visiting the leading centers 
of interest in Europe. In the sphere of business activity such as in which Mr. Brew- 
ster spent the major part of his life, it is difficult to characterize those elements in a 
man's make-up which are most essential in attaining preeminence. That the suc- 
cessful broker must possess a thorough knowledge of existing and prospective val- 
ues of speculative properties, that he must possess rare judgment in making or 
advising investments and many times be obliged to act on matters involving fortunes 
on a moment's notice, that he must be a man of business, courage, and most of all 
a man of unquestioned probity, is necessarily true. That these qualities predomi- 
nated in INIr. Brewster, his splendid success gave ample testimony. His tempera- 
ment was of that restless, sanguine type which is never satisfied with "well done" 
but confident of yet greater eft'ort and greater results. This spirit was very notice- 
able in his younger days during the several changes of occupations, always made 
in the hope of improved opportunities and the ultimate attainment of better things. 
When finally he had determined upon the vocation for which he believed himself 
adapted and which, at least, was consonant with his tastes, he surrendered to it 
his best energies and thought; and from that time his career was an upward and 
prosperous one. The firm of Edward L. Brewster & Company continued to increase 
from year to year until it ranked among the foremost of similar concerns in the 
west. In July, 1904, upon Mr. Brewster's retirement from active business, the firm 
of Edward L. Brewster & Company was succeeded by Russell, Brewster & Com- 
pany. Edward P. Russell was admitted into the old firm in 1896 and Walter S. 
Brewster in 1899, while C. L. Peniston joined the new firm in 1907. 

On November 12, 1866, Mr. Brewster married Miss Mary, daughter of Hiram 
Niles, of Buffalo, New York, who bore him six children, two of whom, a son and 
daughter, are now living: Walter Stanton, of Russell, Brewster & Company; and 

Pauline Brewster. 

Walter Stanton Brewster, of the firm of Russell, Brewster & Company, bankers 
and brokers, was born in Evanston, Illinois, on the 4.th of September, 1872, his 



168 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

parents being Edward Lester and Mary (Niles) Brewster, of the above review. He 
attended St. Paul's school of Concord, New Hampshire, until June, 1891, and in 
1895 was graduated from Yale University with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
In 1S9G he entered the service of his father's institution, Edward L. Brewster & 
Company, bankers and brokers, and in January, 1899, was admitted to the firm. 
In July, 1904, this concern was succeeded by the firm of Russell, Brewster & 
Company. Walter S. BrcMster is governor of the Chicago Stock Exchange, a mem- 
ber of the New York Stock Exchange and a director and member of the executive 
committee of the United Charities. He also belongs to the Chicago University, 
Onwentsia and Saddle and Cycle Clubs and is likewise a member of the University 
and Yale Clubs of New York. In golf and horseback riding he finds both recrea- 
tion and pleasure. On the 24th of January, 1903, he wedded Miss Kate Lancaster, 
by whom he has two children, Sarah and Edward L. The family residence is at 
Lake Forest, Illinois. 



HUGH L. KENNY. 



Hugh L. Kenny, a progressive and enterprising young man, is engaged in the 
undertaking business as a partner in the firm of Kenny Brothers, this being the 
outgrowth of the business which was established in 1892 by John F. Kenny and 
which has undergone several changes in the personnel to the present time, the firm 
of Kenny Brothers now existing having been established on the 1st of January, 1917. 

Hugh L. Kenny was born February 12, 1884, and acquired a parochial school 
education and continued his studies in the St. Ignatius College. After his textbooks 
were put aside he entered the undertaking business with his father and thoroughly 
acquainted himself with all phases of the work, so that he was well qualified to take 
charge of the business at his father's death, which occurred when the son was 
nineteen years of age. As previously stated, the business was established by John 
F. Kenny in 1892 at No. 5205 State street. The business was carried on under the 
firm style of Kenny & Company and was continued at the original location for three 
years, when a removal was made to No. 5551 Halsted street, where they continued 
for three years. The next removal took them to 5438 Halsted street about 1897, at 
which time the firm erected a building two stories in height with a frontage of twenty- 
five feet, the second story being used as a lodge hall. The chapel has a seating 
capacity of seventy-five. The business was carried on under the firm name of Kenny 
& Company until 1895, when a change in the partnership occurred, leading to the 
adoption of the style of Kenny & Doherty. This was again changed in 1898 to 
Kenny & Company and was so continued until January 1, 1917, when the present 
firm of Kenny Brothers was organized, succeeding to the business which had been 
carried on for a quarter of a century. Mr. Kenny is a member of the Chicago Under- 
takers Association, also of the Chicago Motor Liverymen's Association, and he has 
his own auto livery service, which includes two hearses and four motor cars. 

In 1910 Mr. Kenny was united in marriage to Miss Bridget Cunninghata, of 
Mount Greenwood, and they have become parents of three children, Helen, Elizabeth 
and John F. The religious faith of the family is that of the Catholic church, their 
membership being in the Visitation church. 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 169 

In politics Mr. Kenny maintains an independent course. He is identified with 
several fraternal organizations, including the Knights of Columbus, the Catholic 
Order of Foresters, the National Union, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, 
the Knights of The Maccabees, the Royal League and the Roj^al Arcanum. He also 
belongs to the Garfield Business Men's Association and he is interested in all that 
pertains to the irnprovement of business conditions in the section of the city in which 
he makes his home. 



JENS JENSEN. 



Jens Jensen needs no introduction to Chicago's citizens, especially those who 
have concern for the welfare, improvement and adornment of this city, for he is 
a cooperant factor in all the organized movements which are being made to enhance 
the beauty of the western metropolis and extend its park area, thus preparing 
for future as well as present needs. In business he made a humble start in Chi- 
cago, but experience and study have continually advanced him until he is today 
recognized as one of its foremost landscape artists — one to whom form and beauty 
as manifest in nature make strong appeal and who also in his public service is 
prompted by a spirit of broad humanitarianism. He was born in Denmark, Sep- 
tember 13, 1860, a son of Christian and Magdalen Sofia (Petersen) Jensen, the 
former a farmer by occupation and the owner of a tract of land which has been in 
the possession of the family for several hundred years. Reared amid the environ- 
ment of farm life, Jens Jensen supplemented his early education by study in the 
Agricultural and Horticultural College of his native country. The following year 
he came to America and that his training along agricultural and horticultural lines 
was thorough and comprehensive was soon evidenced in the ability which he dis- 
played along those lines. The year 1885 w^as devoted to farming in Iowa and 
from 1886 until 1900 he was connected with the west park system of Chicago. He 
at first took a position as laborer but he knew that his ability and industry would 
soon win recognition and from time to time he was advanced until he was made 
superintendent of Humboldt park. From 1900 until 1906 he followed the profes- 
sion of landscape architect in Chicago and through the three succeeding years was 
landscape architect and general superintendent of the west park system. Since 
that time he has concentrated his energies upon professional service as a landscape 
architect and his broad experience and constant study along that line has placed 
him in a most conspicuous and honorable position as a representative of that depart- 
ment of business. Because of his practical and advanced ideas his opinions have 
been constantly sought concerning questions of public improvement along his line. 
He is a member of the special park commission, is consulting landscape architect 
for the west park system, is secretary of the State Art Commission and a director 
of the Municipal Art League, organizations which are seeking to bring artistic 
adornment and improvement into an even balance with the utilitarian phases of 
municipal and state interests. In 1909 he was made the secretary of the com- 
mittee of the Geographic Society of Chicago that had the law passed for the 
creation of a commission to secure Starved Rock and other historic and scenic lands 
in Illinois for state parks. In 1902 he was a member of the metropolitan park 



170 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

committee and wrote the landscajDe report for an outer belt or forest park system 
for Chicago. With keen foresight he has recognized the needs of the city in this 
direction. Chicago is outclassed by many of the metropolitan centers of the world 
in the acreage and improvement of its j^arks and Mr. Jensen has jDut forth every 
efifort to awaken public opinion to the need of developing a park system that will 
be adequate for our present condition and for the greater congestion that is bound 
to come with the growth of the city. 

Mr. Jensen holds membership in the American Geographic Society, the Amer- 
ican Forestry Association, the American Economic Society, the American Associa- 
tion for the Advancement of Science, the Chicago Architectural Club, the Chicago 
Art Institute and several foreign societies. His membership relations with Chi- 
cago organizations extend to the City Club, the Cliff Dwellers, the Academy of 
Sciences, the Municipal Art League and the Chicago Geograjahic Society. He has 
studied landscajDe art in his travels in European countries and made a particular 
study of the prairies or plains of America and upon these later studies is based 
his conception of landscajDC art as it fits into the conditions, climatic and otherwise, 
here found. 

Mr. Jensen is married and has four children, one of his sons being now engaged 
in business with him. There are many examples of men of foreign birth who have 
won success in the business circles of America but comparatively few have been 
more actively or helpfully concerned in municipal progress than Mr. Jensen. He 
has ever regarded business as but one phase of existence and, with the belief that 
life means more than the attainment of prosperity, he has sought to enrich it by 
beauty as exemplified in the various forms of nature and of art. He has occupied 
a position far in advance of others concerning municipal adornment but has had 
the satisfaction of seeing many of his opinions endorsed and embodied in tangible 
form. 



JOHN R. REILLY. 



A substantial building of pressed brick and cut stone, situated at Nos. 1716 and 
1718 West Sixty-third street, constitutes the undertaking establishment of John 
R. Reilly and was erected by him for the purpose used. Mr. Reilly is a native of the 
neighboring state of Wisconsin, his birth having occurred in the city of Beloit on 
the 13th day of May, 1872, his parents being Hugh and Maria (Clement) Reilly, both 
of whom are now deceased. He acquired a public school education and started out 
in the business world as a clerk, being employed in various stores and also in a 
clerical capacity in the post office at Beloit. In the year 1888 the family removed 
to Omaha, Nebraska, Avhere he resided until 1891, when at the age of twenty-two 
3'ears he came to Chicago and secured a clerkship in a grocery establishment, with 
.which he was connected until 1899. He was ambitious, however, to engage in busi- 
ness on his own account and carefully saved his earnings until his economy and 
industry had brought him sufficient capital to enable him to carry out his cherished 
plan. He then opened a grocery and meat market at Sixty-third street and Ashland 
avenue and conducted a substantial business there for about six years or until 190;?. 
wlien he was elected to the state legislature and sold his grocery store. He served 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 171 

for three years as a member of the house of representatives in the general assembly 
and gave careful consideration to many vital questions which came up for settle- 
ment during that joeriod, his aid and influence being always on the side of progress 
and improvement in public affairs. In 1908 he entered the undertaking business 
at No. 1404 West Sixty-third street and there remained until 1917, when he erected 
a fine building at Nos. 1716 and 1718 West Sixty-third street. The structure, built 
of pressed brick with cut stone trimmings, is two stories in height and has a 
frontage of fifty feet. There is a chapel with a seating capacity of one hundred and 
twenty-six and by using an adjoining room over two hundred can be seated. 
Mr. Reilly has made special arrangements for holding wakes in his establishment 
and has a smoking room that will accommodate more than thirty people. His oper- 
ating room is not in the basement but is situated on the first floor, and the casket 
display room is on the second floor. There is also an attractive eight-room apart- 
ment on the second floor. In the rear stands a garage with capacity for eight cars. 
The entire building is fireproof and was specially designed for the purpose intended. 
The entrance is tile floored and the first floor rooms are finished in oak, while the 
apartment above is finished in birdseye maple, mahogany and oak. His place is 
one of the finest of the kind in the United States, having thorough equipment in all 
that relates to the undertaking business. Mr. Reilly belongs to the Chicago Under- 
takers Association and also to the Chicago Motor Liverymen's Association. 

On the 30th of August, 1899, Mr. Reilly was united in marriage to Miss Lillian 
Gibson, of Chicago, a daughter of Jacob and Abbie (Crosby) Gibson. Fraternally 
he is connected with the Knights of Columbus, being one of the organizers of Father 
Perez Council and its financial secretary since the organization on the 7th of 
November, 1909. He is also connected with the Catholic Order of Foresters, the 
Ancient Order of Hibernians, the Royal Arcanum, the Knights and Ladies of 
Security, the Woodmen of the World, the Modern Brotherhood of America, the 
Catholic Mutual Benefit Association and the United Irish Societies. He likewise 
belongs to St. Theodore's Catholic church and is actively and helpfully interested in 
various church societies. His political allegiance is given to the democratic party 
and he is an earnest and active worker in its ranks. He belongs to the West Engle- 
wood Business Men's Association and concentrates his efforts in considerable measure 
upon promoting the projects put forth by that organization for the improvement of 
the section of the city in which he is carrying on business. He is, moreover, inter- 
ested in all that has to do with general advancement and public improvement and 
his entire course, whether in business, social or church connections, has been marked 
by progressiveness that has accomplished substantial results. 



WILLIAM B. HORNUNG. 



William B. Hornung, who since 1910 has been engaged in the undertaking busi- 
ness in Chicago, is now located at No. 8610 Summit avenue, where he has a two-story 
building with a frontage of twenty-five feet. He there conducts a well appointed 
imdertaking establishment, carrying a large line of all equipment of that character. 
Chicago is his native city. He was born on the 31st of May, 1880, and is a son of 
Martin and Dora (Pfaender) Hornung, who are also nktives of Chicago, where the 



172 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

grandparents of William B. Hornung settled in pioneer times. His grandfather 
was a carpenter by trade and built the first store front on Bunker street. He has 
long since passed away. Martin Hornung in early life took up the upholsterer's 
trade and for thirty-two years has been associated along that line with Marshall 
Field & Company. 

In the acquirement of his education William B. Hornung of this review attended 
the Carter H. Harrison school, from which he was graduated with the class of 1893. 
He started upon his business career as an apprentice in wood pattern making and 
thoroughly learned the trade, which he followed for seven years. He entered the 
undertaking business in 1910, purchasing the building at No. 8610 Summit avenue, 
where he has since carried on business. He has a chapel with a seating capacity of 
one hundred and his establishment is thoroughly modern in its equipment and in 
the line of caskets and undertaking goods carried. That he has continued in the 
business for eight years is indicative of the success which he has achieved, a growing 
patronage being accorded him during all the intervening period. 

On the 3rd of June, 1913, Mr, Hornung was united in marriage to Miss Lura 
Knupp, of Peoria, Illinois, and to them has been born a son, William Jacob, now 
three years of age. Mr. Hornung belongs to Auburn Park Lodge, No. 789, A. F. 
& A. M., and has attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite In Oriental 
Consistory and has crossed the sands of the desert with the Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine of Medinah Temple. He also belongs to the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and has held all of the chairs in the local lodge. He likewise has member- 
ship in Auburn Park Council of the Royal League, of which he has three times 
been archon, and he belongs to the Knights of The Maccabees, the Order of Mutual 
Protection and the Wood Pattern Makers Association, with which he has been 
affiliated for the past nineteen years. His wife attends the Christian Science church, 
while Mr. Hornung attends the Evangelical Lutheran church. His political allegi- 
ance is given to the republican party, and while he has never been an aspirant for 
office, he is ever interested in the welfare of community, city and state and that he 
is willing to actively cooperate in all movements and plans for the benefit and 
progress of his section of the city is indicated in the fact that he holds membership 
in the Gresham Business Men's Association and in the Gresham Improvement Club. 



WILLIAM LINCOLN BUSH. 

Prominent among those whose financial responsibilities have constituted the 
broad foundation of Chicago's business enterprise, activity and advancement William 
Lincoln Bush is numbered. He is also known where initiative spirit and progressive- 
ness lead the way to larger undertakings and the evidence of his business capacity 
and aptitude for successful management is found in the various enterprises with 
which he is connected, chief among which is the manufacture and sale of pianos 
conducted under the name of the Bush & Gerts Piano Company, of which he is 
the president. This alone would entitle Mr. Bush to mention among the prominent 
citizens of Chicago and yet in another field his labors and influence have been 
none the less important and far reaching, if, perhaps, of a less tangible character. 
There are few citizens of Chicago who have equalled him in effective effort to pro- 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 173 

mote musical taste and artistic talent, his activity in this direction resulting in the 
establishment and conduct of the Bush Temple Conservatory and the School of 
Acting. 

Chicago numbers ]Mr. Bush among her native sons whose records have always 
reflected credit upon the history of the city. He Avas here born, March 3, 1861, 
his parents being William H. and Mary J. (Brunt) Bush, the former the founder 
of the great enterprise now conducted by the Bush & Gerts Piano Company. He 
was a native of ]\Iechanicstown, Maryland, born in 1823, and in 1857 removed 
from Baltimore to Chicago, where he established a lumber business that had become 
one of the most extensive in the city at the time of the ever memorable conflagra- 
tion of 1871. The day after the fire his sole worldly possessions consisted of two 
charred steamers, ladened with lumber that had been towed from the river to the 
outer harbor. His heavy losses, however, could not depress a nature fraught with 
laudable ambition, notable energy and untiring perseverance, and he set to work 
with other resolute, determined men to rebuild the city and at the same time his 
own fortunes. When he had located in Chicago he established one of the first 
commission houses on South Water street, conducting it for twenty years. In 1875 
he erected a large two-story building at the corner of North Clark street and 
Chicago avenue with the idea of founding an establishment similar to the old Lex- 
ington market in Baltimore, but the delivery system seemed more popular in Chi- 
cago and, recognizing the fact that his venture would ^Drobably prove unsuccessful, 
Mr. Bush remodeled his building into stores. He also continued in the commission 
business and carried on his packing establishment for seven years, the latter, located 
on the present site of the Bush Temjale of Music, having a capacity of about seven 
hundred hogs per day. He afterward engaged in the real estate business for two 
years and then extended his efforts to a new field by undertaking the manufacture 
of pianos with his son, William L. Bush, and John Gerts as partners. The latter 
were the practical members of the firm, with William H. Bush as adviser, the 
interests of the house being promoted largely through his somad judgment and 
experience. As in his other ventures Mr. Bush met "with success in this line, 
which was conducted originally under the firm name of W. H. Bush & Company 
and later under the style of the Bush & Gerts Piano Company following its incor- 
poration with a capital stock of four hundred thousand dollars. 

William H. Bush was for more than forty years a prominent member of the 
Methodist church, taking an active part in its various lines of work and its associated 
charities. At the time of the fire almost his first thought seemed to be for the 
Grace ^lethodist church, in which he had been a deacon throughout the period of 
his residence in Chicago, and he generously contributed from his meager stock 
of lumber to the rebuilding of the church, which was completed within a week. His 
philanthropy was further manifest in connection with the Methodist Old Peoples' 
Home in Edgewater. His first donation of thirty-five thousand dollars made the 
building of Bush Hall possible and with that as a nucleus the institution has been 
extended until it accommodates two hundred and fifty of the aged dependent. Mr. 
Bush was also very generous in his support of the Methodist Orphanage and the 
Colored Methodist Mission and many other institutions. He was one of the leading 
temperance workers of the city and in 1886 was the prohibition candidate for the 
mayoralty. He gave freely to the Frances Willard Temperance Home and for 
years was an active member of the Society for the suppression of Vice and of the 



174 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

Civic Federation. He was a man of action rather than of theory and, while others 
devised plans, he was engaged in the execution of practical work of reform and of 
moral and municipal progress. 

In 18-i7 William H. Bush wedded Miss Mary Jane Brunt, a daughter of Ralph 
Brunt of Baltimore. She died September 22, 1905, and the only survivors of their 
eight children are William L. and Benjamin F., a retired business man, prominent 
in the Christian Science movement. 

The younger son, William Lincoln Bush, received his public-school training in 
Chicago and entered business life at Cambridgeport, Massachusetts, in 1877 in 
connection with the piano manufacturing house of George Woods & Company, in 
which he became acquainted with the practical work in the factory and with the 
sales end of the business, becoming a representative of the house upon the road. 
He was also a traveling salesman for the W. W. Kimball Piano Company from 
1879 until 1881. Four years were then devoted to the commission business, after 
which he entered into the field in which he is so well known in Chicago, joining 
his father and John Gerts in forming the firm of W. H. Bush & Company, of which 
he became manager. After four years the business was incorporated as the Bush 
& Gerts Piano Company -vnth a capital stock of four hundred thousand dollars, 
which has since been increased to one million dollars. William L. Bush acted as 
secretary of the incorporated company until chosen to the presidency after the 
death of his father in 1901. The growth of the business is indicated in the fact 
that branch houses have been established in Boston, Massachusetts; Memphis, 
Tennessee; and Dallas and Austin, Texas, while agencies are foiuid in all of the 
large cities and towns of the country, the output amounting to about six thousand 
pianos annually. The high grade of these instruments in tone, quality and work- 
manship is indicated in the fact that they are used in the New England Conserva- 
tory of Boston, Drake L^niversity at Des Moines, Iowa, Hamilton College at 
Lexington, Kentucky, and in other prominent educational institutions. After the 
establishment of the piano manufacturing business along successful lines many 
subsidiary interests were promoted. The company now maintains magnificent 
salesrooms at the Bush Temple of Music, at the northwest corner of North Clark 
street and Chicago avenue, conducted as a department of the Bush & Gerts Piano 
Company. In addition to the presidency of that company William L. Bush is 
treasurer and founder of the Bush Temple Conservatory of Music and Dramatic 
Art of Chicago, vice president of the Bush & Gerts Piano Company of Texas and 
the Bush Temple of Music at Dallas, Texas. He inaugurated the plan of extending 
his business by the erection of "Bush Temples" in various large cities and towns 
in the United States, utilized by the Bush & Gerts Piano Company for the sale 
of their product, and by the further establishment of Bush Temple Conservatories 
which are centers of musical education. In financial circles he is known as a direc- 
tor of the North Side Savings Bank of Chicago. 

How far his influence has been felt along artistic lines it is impossible to measure 
by any one standard, yet all acknowledge the forcefulness, effectiveness and high 
character of his work in this department. He established the Bush Temple Con- 
servatory as a school of music, acting and modern languages, organized on the 
broadest art basis, and has spared neither effort nor expense in adhering to the 
highest ideals. While it is the youngest of the large schools, having been founded 
in 1901, it is preeminently first in the character of its faculty, surroundings and 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 175 

general equipment. Mr. Bush has secured as his cooperants in this work many 
of the most prominent artists and masters in their particular lines — eminent teachers 
of piano, violin^ organ, violoncello, vocal music, composition and orchestration, and 
in fact everything appertaining to the art of music in all its varied forms and 
expressions. There is also a department of physical culture, elocution, languages^ 
dancing and orchestral school and school of acting, and the course is most thorough, 
practical and comprehensive. From the school of acting have come a number of 
distinguished artists who are now prominent upon the stage today, including such 
people as E. J. Morgan, James Carew, Zelda Sears, Edith Browning, Mildred 
Holland, Antoinette Walker, Helen Singer and others who have been engaged by 
the most prominent theatrical managers of the country. In this work Mr. Bush 
has given an impetus to the public appreciation of art values that can scarcely be 
overestimated. 

Mr. Bush and his wife reside at the Plaza Hotel. He was married February 
26, 1887, to Miss Pearl E. Barrow, and they are prominently known in the lead- 
ing social circles of the city. Mr. Bush belongs to the Illinois Athletic Club, the 
Hamilton Club, the Germania and Mendelssohn Clubs and the Marquette Club,^ 
of which he was president from 1901 until 1903. He is a Mason and his association 
with the Hamilton Club indicates his republican preferences in politics. Aside from 
the exercise of his right of franchise and his helpful manifestation of interest 
in all projects of good citizenship, he is not active in politics, preferring to concen- 
trate his energies upon the further development of the extensive business and 
artistic projects of which he is now the controlling head. 



JAMES P. ROCHE. 



James P. Roche is a veteran of the Spanish-American war. He has at different 
times been connected with public office in Chicago and at the present writing is 
successfully engaged in the undertaking business. He was born in Montreal, Can- 
ada, on the 18th of July, 1867, and is a son of Michael and Catherine (Collins) 
Roche, both of whom were natives of Ireland, whence they crossed the Atlantic in 
childhood, becoming residents of Canada, where they remained for a number of 
years. They crossed the border into the United States in 1868, making their way 
to Chicago, where they continued to reside until called to the home beyond. 

James P. Roche was but a year old when the family home was established in 
this city and his education was acquired in St. Bridget's parochial school and in the 
public schools. After his textbooks were put aside he learned the butchering business, 
at which he worked at the stock yards. In 1898 he was appointed to a clerical 
position in the office of the county treasurer, where he remained for two years and 
afterward was employed as a clerk in the office of the county clerk but subsequently 
returned to the county treasurer's office and continued there for eight or ten years, 
being most careful, methodical and reliable in the discharge of his duties, as is 
indicated by his long retention in the office. In 1909, however, wishing to have his 
labors more directly benefit himself, he established an undertaking business as a mem- 
ber of the firm of McCarthy & Roche at No. 5111 South Halsted street. In 1910 he 
sold out but after a brief period bought back into the business, taking over the 



176 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

interests of Mr. McCarthy. He continued at the original location until 1913, when a 
removal was made to No. 917 West Eighty-seventh street, where he occupies a build- 
ing with twenty-five foot frontage and containing a chapel with a seating capacity 
for sixty. He has his own auto livery and all modern equipments and he belongs to 
the Chicago Undertakers Association and to the Chicago Motor Liverymen's Associa- 
tion. 

On the 22d of April, 1894, Mr. Roche was united in marriage to Miss Lizzie 
Bermke, of Chicago. They have a daughter, Eleanor Lynn, whose birth occurred 
January 12, 1901. The parents are members of St. Kilian's Catholic church and Mr. 
Roche belongs to the Holy Name Society and acts as chief usher in the church. He 
has membership with the Modern Woodmen of America, also with the National Union 
and the Knights and Ladies of Security. He is also connected with the Knights of 
Columbus, the Ancient Order of Hibernians and with the Gresham Business Men's 
Association. He likewise belongs to the Spanish-American War Veterans Associa- 
tion, having served as a member of Company K of the Second Illinois Infantry. He 
is connected with the Eighty-seventh Street Development Association and is much 
interested along all lines of general improvement and progress, his aid and coopera- 
tion being counted upon to further any plan or movement that seeks to develop his 
section of the city or advance civic standards. 



FREDERICK AUGUSTUS SMITH. 

Frederick Augustus Smith, who has carved his name high on the keystone of the 
legal arch of Illinois, has throughout his life been a resident of Cook county. 
He was born in Norwood Park, February 11, 1844. His parents were Israel G. 
and Susan (Pennoyer) Smith, natives of New York and Connecticut respectively, 
while 1816 was the natal year of both. In \8S5 the father removed from the 
Empire state to Cook county and from the rich prairie land selected a tract for 
which he received a government deed in return for the usual nominal price. Tliere 
he developed the family homestead and continued to reside there throughout his 
remaining days. He had for some time survived his wife, who died in 1894. 

It was upon the old family homestead that Judge Smith was reared, and after 
mastering the elementary branches of learning in the public schools of Chicago 
he became a pupil in the preparatory department of the old Chicago University 
in 1860. Two years later he enrolled as a regular student in the collegiate depart- 
ment but a year later put aside his text-books to espouse the cause of his country, 
enlisting as a private of Comj^any G, One Hundred and Thirty-fourth Illinois In- 
fantry. During the year of his enlistment he served in the Missouri and Ken- 
tucky campaigns, remaining with his regiment until it was mustered out in 1864. 
Returning to Chicago he again entered the university and the ^Master of Arts degree 
was conferred upon him at the time of his graduation in 1866. Determining upon 
the practice of law as a life work, he entered the Union College of Law the same 
year and was graduated in 1867 with the LL. B. degree. He has since been an 
active member of the Illinois bar and, forming a partnership with C. C. Kohlsaat, 
engaged in practice under the firm style of Smith & Kohlsaat until 1872. He 
was thereafter alone in general practice until 1890. when he became senior partner 




FREDERICK A. SMITH 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 179 

in the law firm of Smith, Helmer, Moulton & Price, which remained his business 
connection for twelve years. As a lawyer he possesses few of those dazzling 
meteoric qualities which attract widespread but eifervescent admiration, his abilities 
hieing more of a substantial quality, characterized by the continuity that endures 
and is manifest in the masterful grasp of the problems presented for solution. 
In 1898 he was made the republican nominee for judge of the superior court, 
and although defeated in that campaign was in June, 1903, elected a judge of 
the circuit court of Cook county for the term expiring in June, 1909. In De- 
cember, 1904, he was assigned to the appellate court and his record is that of one 
of the strongest and most able jurists that have sat upon the appellate bench. 

On the 25th of July, 1871, Judge Smith was married to Miss Frances B. Morey, 
a daughter of the Rev. Reuben and Abby (Clemons) Morey, of Merton, Wisconsin. 
They reside at No. 609 Rush street, and their hospitable home is the favorite resort 
with many friends. 

Judge Smith is a prominent figure in various clubs and different organizations 
which bear strong relation to the upbuilding and improvement of Chicago. He 
was formerly president of the Hamilton Club, with which he still holds member- 
ship, and he is also a member of the Union League, Marquette, Chicago and Literary 
Clubs. His standing in the profession is indicated by the fact that he was hon- 
ored with the presidency of the Law Club of Chicago in 1887, and was chosen 
president of the Chicago Bar Association in 1890. He is identified with two of 
the most prominent educational institutions of the city, being a trustee of the Chi- 
cago University and also of Rush Medical College. In his judicial position Judge 
Smith stands as an eminent representative of the Illinois bench, and while because 
of his broad humanitarianism and charity he is inclined toward mercy rather than 
severity, believing that the highest purpose of the law is to reclaim rather than 
to condemn, his decisions nevertheless indicate strong mentality, careful analysis 
and thorough knowledge of the law and an unbiased judgment. Individuality, 
personal feelings, prejudices, peculiarities of disposition are with him lost in the 
dignity, impartiality and equity of the office to which property, right and liberty 
must look for protection. Possessing superior qualifications. Judge Smith justly 
merits the high honor which was conferred upon him by his elevation to the appellate 
bench. 



HARRY T. MOYER. 



Harry T. Mover, proprietor of a well laid out and amply stocked drug store at 
No. 5756 West Chicago avenue, was born in Allentown, Pennsylvania, July 12, 1874, 
and is a son of John and Matilda Moyer, who in 1880 removed to Delphi, Indiana, 
where the father engaged in the cigar business. It was in that city that Harry T. 
Moyer acquired a grammar school education, after which he engaged in clerking in 
a general mercantile establishment. He arrived in Chicago in July, 1898, and has 
since been connected with commercial interests in this city and vicinity. For a time 
he engaged in clerking for Frank Kramer, of Bowmanville. He further qualified for 
a career along his specific line by pursuing a course of study in the Ilhnois College 
of Pharmacy, from which he was graduated with the class of 1902. He then entered 
the employ of E. H. Sargent & Company and subsequently was connected with the 



Vol. rv— 10 



180 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

Frazer Drug Company. In 1904 he purchased a drug store at No. 5756 West 
Chicago avenue when that section of the city was yet new and largeh' undeveloped, 
his store being the farthest west on the street. In 1916 he purchased the building. 
He has a good corner location and his store is twenty-eight by fifty feet. It has a 
tiled floor and is finished in oak and the equipment is thoroughly modern and attractive. 
On the 19th of November, 1913, Mr. Mover was united in marriage to Miss 
Minnie E. Wolford, of Denver. He is well known in fraternal connections, holding 
membership in Austin Lodge, A. F. & A. M.; Cicero Chapter, No. 180, R. A. M.; 
Austin Commandery, No. 84, K. T.; and Palestine Council, No. 66, R. & S. M. He 
is likewise a member of Medinah Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., of the Knights of 
Pythias and the Improved Order of Red Men. His jjolitical endorsement is given 
to the republican party. Along the lines of his trade he has connection with the 
Chicago Drug Club, the Chicago Retail Druggists Association, of which he served 
as second vice president in 1917; the Illinois Pharmaceutical Association and the 
National Association of Retail Druggists. That he is actuated by a spirit of public 
progress and imjirovement is indicated in the fact that he has been chosen to the 
presidency of the Austin Business Men's Association, and he has done much to 
further the interests of that section of the city. He stands for advancement along 
all those lines which lead to the material, political, social and intellectual progress 
of his community. 



THOMAS M. THOMPSON. 

Thomas M. Thompson, conducting a well appointed undertaking establishment 
M'ith his own automobile hearse and motor car as a part of the equipment for the 
conduct of funerals, was born in Tinwick, Canada, on the 21st of October, 1871, a 
son of Peter and Mary (Donovan) Thompson, the former a native of Ireland, while 
the latter was born in England. In 1881 they removed to Chicago where they spent 
their remaining days. 

Thomas M. Thompson was at that time a lad of ten summers and in the acquire- 
ment of his education he attended St. Bridget's parochial school. He afterward 
worked in the canning factory at the Armour plant at the stock yards and subse- 
quently he held the jiosition of sexton at the Immaculate Conception church, acting 
in that capacity for seven years. Upon the death of the Rev. T. P. Hodnet he 
inherited five hundred dollars from the Reverend Father and in November, 1909, 
entered the undertaking business at No. 9104 Cottage Grove avenue. He purchased 
the property — a two-story building with twenty-five foot front and containing a 
chapel capable of seating fifty people. There is a garage in the rear and he owns an 
automobile hearse and car, which are being continually used in the conduct of the 
funerals for which he is engaged. He carries a large line of undertaking supplies and 
his business has steadily developed until it has now reached substantial proportions. 

On the 31st of August, 1903, Mr. Thompson was united in marriage to Miss 
Maggie Ansbro, who was born in Ireland and in her girlhood became a resident of 
Chicago, her father, James Ansbro, having removed from the Emerald Isle with his 
family and taken up his abode in the new world. Mr. and Mrs. Thompson have a 
daughter, Mary. They hold membership in St. Joachim's Catholic church and 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 181 

fraternally he is identified with the Knights of Cohnnbus, the Catholic Order of 
Foresters, the Ancient Order of Hibernians and the Fraternal Order of Eagles, 
serving as a trustee in the last named. He also belongs to various church societies 
and is interested in everything that has to do with the extension of Catholic influence 
in the city. He concentrates his efforts and attention upon his business affairs and 
he has membership with the Chicago Undertakers Association. Previous to entering 
the business for himself he served a two year apprenticeship with E. J. Sullivan and 
on June 11, 1909, he graduated from the Chicago Post Graduate College of Embalm- 
ing and his study along the lines of his business has given him a high degree of 
efficiency in his work. 



JOHN JACOB ARNOLD. 



John Jacob Arnold, manager of the foreign exchange department of the First 
National Bank of Chicago and also an acknowledged authority on the subject of 
international exchange, is a native of Canada and, like thousands of ambitious young 
men of that country, cast his lot with the American Republic. He was born on a 
farm in Wallace township, county of Perth, Ontario, December 29, 1870, and is a 
son of Adam and Elizabeth (Strieker) Arnold, the mother being a native of Naper- 
ville, Illinois, and of German and French ancestry. The father was born at 
Apfelbach, a suburb of Heidelberg, Germany, and is of English descent. The 
first ancestor of the family in German}' was brought to that country from the 
county of Kent, England, in 1642, by the king as a pearl and jewel specialist and 
in 1692 was knighted in recognition of the introduction of his art into Germany. 
The family for several generations engaged in the pearl and jewelrj^ business and 
the male members then became identified with the army. Several of them are now 
officers under the emperor. George Arnold, the grandfather of our subject, emigrated 
to Canada with his family in 1845, when his son Adam was two and one-half years 
old. After growing to maturity the latter devoted his attention to farming and he 
and his wife are now living retired at Listowel, Ontario, the father being sixty- 
eight and the mother sixty-three years of age. 

The second in order of birth in a family of eight children, John J. Arnold 
received his preliminary education in the country schools. Later he entered Central 
College at Stratford, Ontario, from which he was graduated in 1888. He then 
began the study of law at Listowel but after two years was obliged to relinquish 
his ambition to become a professional man on account of ill health. He came to 
the United States and after spending a short time in the south settled at Chicago 
and entered the employ of the First National Bank as assistant bookkeeper in the 
foreign exchange department. He passed through various positions in the depart- 
ment, becoming head accountant and chief clerk. In 1905 he was appointed assist- 
ant manager of the department and since 1909 has held the position of manager. 
He has for many years made a specialty of the study of international exchange and 
has collected a large amount of valuable information on that subject, being recognized 
as one of the best informed men in the country in his chosen line. He is a member 
of the foreign trade committee of the Chicago Association of Commerce and also of 
the American Institute of Banking. 



182 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

On the 9th of June, 1896, Mr. Arnold was married, at Oak Park, to Miss Olga 
Hoehn, a daupjhter of Rev. M. Hoehn, and to this union three children have been 
born: Rhoda, who is thirteen years of age; Victor, who died in 1904', at the age of 
two and one-half 3' ears ; and Herta, aged five years. The eldest daughter, Rhoda, 
possesses fine mental powers and has inherited rare vocal talents. In politics Mr. 
Arnold adheres to the republican party but not as a partisan. He is now serving 
as a member of the board of trustees of the village of Oak Park, where he has 
resided for fifteen years, and has evinced the interest of a patriotic citizen in local 
affairs. He has for many years been an active worker in the Evangelical Associa- 
tion and has been a member of some of the general boards. He is now a member 
of the board of control of the Young Peoples Alliance and general treasurer of the 
organization. He is also a member of the committee on Church Union and 
treasurer of that body. He is identified with the Hamilton Club, and he and his 
wife are members of the Mendelssohn Club, the Musical Art Society and various 
other musical organizations. He is a lover of flower culture and takes great pleasure 
in the automobile. A man of strong literary tastes, he is a frequent speaker on 
financial subjects and a contributor to magazines and reviews. During the past 
year he has delivered many addresses on the financing of the cotton crop and was 
recently invited by the University of Pennsylvania to prepare an article upon that 
subject for publication by the university in a text-book. Having applied himself 
zealously to his calling, Mr. Arnold has shown large business capacity and also an 
energy and progressiveness which reflect great credit upon himself and those with 
whom he is associated. 



LOUIS KREBS. 



Louis Krebs is one of the oldest undertakers in years of continuous connection 
with the business in Chicago, having become identified with the work of undertaking 
half a century ago. He was born in Madison, Indiana, on the 12th of January, 
1852, and is a son of Bliss and Elizabeth Krebs, who came to Chicago in the year 
of his birth. The father was a cabinet maker by trade and in 1867 he opened an 
undertaking business at Sherman and Polk streets, where he remained until the 
great fire of October, 1871, destroyed his establishment. He then resumed business 
at State street and Hubbard court but was again burned out. He afterward removed 
to 2617 Cottage Grove avenue and in June, 1882, a removal was made to South 
Chicago, where he opened the first exclusive undertaking establishment, his location 
being at Ninety-second street and Superior avenue. 

Louis Krebs, reared under the parental roof, acquired his education in Chicago 
schools and in early boyhood began assisting his father in the business, so that he 
is today one of the oldest undertakers in Chicago in years of continuous connection 
with the profession. He took up arterial embalming as early as 1871 but did not 
practice it exclusively. In 1880 he was among those who introduced that process 
generally. He has always been most scientific in his methods and his work has been 
the result of deep research and scientific investigation along the line of his profes- 
sion. He has become acknowledged one of the expert undertakers of the city. In 
1891 he removed to 3066 East Ninety-second street and 9142 Baltimore avenue, 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 183 

where he has a building fifty-two by fifty-four feet and two stories in height. This 
contains a chapel with a seating capacity for one hundred. He owns an auto hearse 
and has a most thoroughly equipped undertaking establishment. The second floor 
of the building is a well ajipointed apartment which he occupies. He belongs to 
the Chicago Undertakers Association and to the Chicago Motor Liverymen's Associa- 
tion. At his establishment Mr. Krebs has an embalmed man over six feet tall that 
he has had for over thirty-two years and a pair of twins that were grown together 
and died at birth. Both of these he embalmed more than thirty-two years ago. 
These specimens have been on exhibition to the profession many times. Mr. Krebs 
has some remarkable methods of embalming and he carries a large stock of under- 
taking goods, so that he is ready to meet any of the demands of the trade. 

On the 30th of May, 1881, Mr. Krebs was united in marriage to Miss Kathryn 
Lutz, of Chicago, and to them have been born four children: Clara, now deceased; 
and Mary, Elizabeth and Kathryn, all of whom are at home. His daughter Mary 
is a licensed embalmer, having been licensed in March, 1906, and she has assisted 
lier father from girlhood. 

Mr. Krebs is a member of the Knights of Columbus ; also of the National Union, 
in which he is serving at trustee; the North American, of which he is treasurer; 
St. Patrick's Court of the Catholic Order of Foresters, of which he is treasurer; 
the Fraternal Order of Eagles; the Knights of Pythias; and the Uniformed Rank 
of the Catholic Knights of America, in which he is a brigadier general. He also 
belongs to SS. Peter and Paul's Catholic church and is identified with several church 
societies. His political endorsement is given to the democratic party but he has 
never been an office seeker, nor has he sought or desired political preferment. He 
has always concentrated his efforts and attention upon his business affairs, which 
have been carefully directed and have brought to him substantial success. He has 
been a member of the Chicago Undertakers Association and the Chicago Motor 
Liverymen's Association ever since they were organized. No representative of the 
profession is better known in Chicago than Mr. Krebs, who is esteemed and respected 
by all with whom he has been brought in contact. 



GEORGE McNAUGHTEN VIAL. 

George McNaughten Vial, president of the H. :\I. Hooker Company, secretary 
and general manager of the Chicago White Lead & Oil Company and also interested 
in other business concerns of Chicago, was born in Lyons township, Cook county, 
Illinois, February 15, 1850, a son of Samuel and Margaret (McNaughten) Vial. 
He is descended from one of the oldest families of New England, representatives 
of the name living in Massachusetts and Rhode Island until his grandfather removed 
to New York and in 1833 to Illinois, where his family joined him in 1834. The 
first of the name in America of whom we have record was John Vial, who died in 
1685 or 1686. He was the father of Jonathan Vial, who died in 172-i, and the 
latter was the father of Joseph Vial, who had a son, Sylvester Vial, the great- 
grandfather of our subject, who died in 1816 at the age of sixty-five years. He 
was the father of Joseph Vial, who came with his family to Illinois in 183 1 and 
died in 1853 at the age of sixty-two years. 



184 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

Samuel Vial, the father of George M. Vial, was a native of Chester, Orange 
county. New York, born July 25, 1819, and in July, 1834, came to Cook county, 
where he engaged in farming until 1874, when he retired to private life. He made 
his home in La Grange and reached the venerable age of over ninety-two years, 
being probably the oldest settler in the county in years of continuous connection 
therewith. He died October 17, 1911. The mother of George M. Vial was Mar- 
garet McNaughten, daughter of George and Jane McNaughten, and was born in 
Aberdeenshire, Scotland. She came to America in 1842, was married to Samuel 
Vial, November 19, 1846, and died May 18, 1856. 

George M. Vial was the second in order of birth in a family of five children, 
of whom four are yet living. His education was acquired in the public schools of 
Lyons township and he was reared in the midst of a farming community, early 
becoming familiar with the duties and labors incident to the development and culti- 
vation of the fields. He thought to find other pursuits more congenial and iDerhajas 
more profitable than farming, however, and in 1868, when a youth of eighteen years, 
he entered the paint and glass business in the employ of H. M. Hooker, of Chicago. 
He afterward returned to the farm, where he continued for a few years, but in 
January, 1880, reentered the emplo}^ of H. M. Hooker and by ability and trust- 
worthiness constantly worked his way upward until 1889, when, on the incorporation 
of the business under the name of the H. M. Hooker Company, he became financially 
interested and upon the retirement of Mr. Hooker in January, 1908, was elected to 
the ipresidency. During this period the business has grown from a small concern 
to one of the largest in its line and Mr. Vial displays marked executive ability in his 
administration of the affairs of his office. In 1895, when Mr. Hooker and others 
associated with him purchased the entire capital stock of the Chicago White Lead 
& Oil Company, iSIr. Vial was made secretary and general manager and has since 
continued in tliat position. To the ujibuilding of this enterprise he has given his 
principal attention, increasing its business three or fourfold during the period of his 
management. He has also been for some years vice president of the Zeno Manu- 
facturing Company, manufacturers of chewing gum, with which concern he has 
been identified since its inception. Lie is a director of the La Grange State Bank 
and is interested in other business enterprises. He has a determined spirit which, 
coupled with indefatigable energy and resourcefulness, has enabled him to carry 
forward to successful completion whatever he has undertaken. Something of his 
position in trade circles is indicated in the fact that he was honored with the 
presidency of the National Paint, Oil & Varnish Association, filling that position 
in 1900-1. > 

On the 15th of Sei^tember, 1874, Mr. Vial was united in mariage to Miss 
Emma F. Goodrich, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Goodrich, of Grundy county, 
Illinois. The}^ have become the parents of three children: Mary McNaughten, 
Myrtle Grace and Charles Henry. Mr. Vial has always lived in Cook county and in 
1892 erected a residence in La Grange, where he has since made his home. He has 
taken an active and helpful interest in local affairs, has served as president of the 
La Grange board of education and as director of the La Grange public librarj\ He 
is an independent republican, usually advocating the principles of the party yet not 
feeling himself bound by party ties, so that when his judgment dictates lie casts an 
independent ballot. He is a member of the La Grange Congregational church and 
is a director of the Chicago City Missionary Society and he belongs to the La 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 185 

Grange Country Club, the Chicago Congregational Club and the Union League 
Club. He has a wide and favorable acquaintance in the social circles of the town 
and in business life enjoys the high regard and confidence of his colleagues and of 
all with whom he has had business relations. Through the exercise of effort he has 
developed his powers and become a leading factor in manufacturing and com- 
mercial circles. 



CARL J. ADAMS. 



Carl J. Adams is well known as a member of the South Chicago Business Men's 
Association and is serving on its executive committee. This is illustrative of the 
spirit of enterprise and progress which actuates him in all that he does and his labors 
have been of direct benefit to the section of the city in which he makes his home. 
He is prominently known as a leading undertaker of Chicago and has been engaged 
in tliat line of business since boyhood, making his initial step in the business world 
in that connection. He was born in St. Joseph, jNIichigan, on the 24th of June, 1879, 
and is a son of Charles and Anna Adams, both of whom were natives of Sweden, 
whence they came to the new world in 1871, making their way into the interior of the 
country and settling at St. Joseph, Michigan. The father was engaged in railroad 
work for ten years and later he took up farming, while subsequently he concentrated 
his attention upon the dairy business, in which he is now engaged. 

Carl J. Adams acquired a public school education in his native city and after- 
ward attended the Cornell school at Grand Crossing. In his boyhood days he entered 
the employ of John R. Pierson, a Chicago undertaker, and later he S23ent three and 
a half years in laundry work. He was ambitious to engage in business on his own 
account and put forth every effort to that end. At length his well directed energy 
and economy had brought him sufficient capital to enable him to take the desired 
step and in 1907 he opened an undertaking business at No. 8900 Mackinaw avenue, 
where he remained for eighteen months. He then removed to No. 9130 Houston 
avenue, where he conducted his business for four j^ears, and on the expiration of that 
period he purchased property at No. 9117 Houston avenue. He was active in 
business there until 1917, when he completed one of the best equipped buildings for 
the purpose in the United States. The building has a frontage of twenty-five feet 
and there is alley space, so that he has light on both sides. The building is one 
hundred and forty-eight feet in depth, two stories in height and has a seven and a 
half foot basement. The front is of pressed brick with cut stone trimmings. The 
chapel has a capacity of one hundred and fifty and is furnished with mission pews. 
The building has oak finish throughout, there are large and comfortable rest rooms 
and the operating room is on the first floor instead of the basement, which is used for 
a storage room and will contain sixty or more caskets. There is also a fine smoking 
room for a coroner's jury. The display room is on the first floor and will hold from 
ten to twenty caskets. On the second floor is a nine-room living apartment with 
laundry, all finished in oak. Mr. Adams has his own automobile ambulance, auto- 
mobile hearse, and touring cars and limousines. He had the first complete auto 
hearse ever made in the United States, it being purchased from Cunningham, and 
was received in June, 1913. It was acqmred at a cost of five thousand dollars. This 



186 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

was indicative of the progressive spirit that has ever characterized Mr. Adams in 
the conduct of his business and in the equijament of his establishment he has con- 
sidered the most sanitary conditions and follows the most sanitary processes in his 
care of the dead. 

In 1900 Mr. Adams was united in marriage to Miss Gertrude Kemnitz, of Grand 
Crossing, a daughter of Fred and Wilhelmina Kemnitz. They have become the 
jDarents of two daughters, Bernice and Grace. The family attend the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

Mr. Adams belongs to Harbor Lodge, No. 731, A. F. & A. M.; Sinai Chapter, 
No. 185, R. A. M.; and Calumet Commandery, No. 62, K. T. He is also identified 
with the council and with the Mystic Shrine and he belongs to Golden Link Lodge, 
No. 917, I. O. O. F.; Bowen Lodge, No. 122, K. P.; South Chicago Aerie, No. 135, 
F. O. E.; the Royal League and many other fraternal organizations. He is likewise 
connected with Linnea, No. 1, I. O. S. and I. O. V., Swedish organizations. He 
belongs to the Chicago Undertakers Association and the Chicago Motor Liverymen's 
Association and is interested in all those organized efforts for the benefit of the trade 
and the standardization of the work of the profession. In politics he is an inde- 
pendent republican, for while he usually votes with the part}', he does not consider 
himself bound by party ties. As stated he is a member of the South Chicago Business 
Men's Association and is serving on its executive committee, in which connection he 
is doing everything in his power to advance the business conditions of his section 
of the city, to promote its trade relations and further the possibilities for increased 
business activity. Moreover, he stands for all those things which are a matter of 
civic virtue and civic pride and his record has at all times been commendable. 



JAMES P. MONAHAN. 



Marked business enterprise and discernment, keen sagacity, coupled with in- 
defatigable industry and energy, have been salient features in the career of James 
P. Monahan, whereby he has reached a very gratifying position in the business 
circles of Chicago, being a partner in the firm of Monahan Brothers, plastering 
contractors. He was born in Wilmington, Illinois, on the 15th of March, 1863, a 
son of Mr. and Mrs. John B. Monahan. who were natives of Ireland and who 
about the year 1858 crossed the Atlantic to the new world, establishing their home 
first at New Orleans, while later they removed northward to Joliet, Illinois, the 
father there becoming a leading plastering contractor and maintaining a foremost 
position in business circles for many years. 

James P. Monahan acquired his education in the public schools of Joliet and 
after spending four years in the railway mail service came to Chicago, where he 
entered into partnership with his brother Edward for the conduct of a plastering 
business in the spring of 1890. For more than a quarter of a century the firm of 
Monahan Brothers has been identified with the building industries of Chicago and 
has become well and favorably known as one of the leading contracting firms in their 
line in the country. Among the more important structures in this city on which 
they have been awarded contracts are: the Fourth Presbyterian church, rectory and 
clubhouse; the Visitation Catholic church; the Sears Roebuck branch of the Young 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 187 

Men's Christian Association and the West Side Young Men's Christian Association; 
the Alexander Graham Bell, Parkside and Louis ChamjDion schools; the Y. M C. A. 
Hotel; the Elks Club; the Michael Reese, Lying-in, Presbyterian, St. Bernard and 
Augustana hospitals, the Cook County tubercular hospital and the Municijial Tuber- 
culosis sanitarium; the First National Bank of Englewood; the Sheridan Trust & 
Savings Bank; the Tecumseh Hotel in Hyde Park; the Englewood and Crown 
theatres; the Vista theatre; the Hebrew Institute of Chicago; the St. George and 
many other large apartment buildings; and the residences of G. F. Swift, Jr., Isham 
Dunham and M. A. Greenebaum. Moreover, they have done a large amount of 
high class work throughout the United States, including such buildings as the Dooley 
block in Salt Lake City; Hotel Patten of Chattanooga; the Seelback Hotel and 
Paul Jones building in Louisville; the Bancroft Hotel at Worcester, Massachusetts; 
the Bankers Life Insurance building at Lincoln, Nebraska; and the Stahlman build- 
ing at Nashville, Tennessee. James P. Monahan is also a director in the Builders 
& Manufacturers Mutual Casualty Company. 

On the 8th of October, 1890, was celebrated the marriage of James P. Monahan 
and Miss Nellie Vaughey, of Seneca, Illinois, and they now reside at No. 6053 
Eberhart street. They are communicants of the Catholic church and Mr. Monahan 
is prominent in organizations which draw their membership from those of Catholic 
faith. He is an ex-chief ranger of Joan of Arc Court of the Catholic Order of 
Foresters and a past grand knight of De La Salle Council of the Knights of 
Columbus. He also has membership with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks 
and along business lines he is president of the Employing Plasterers Association and 
a member of the legal action committee of the Building Construction Employers 
Association. Starting out in the business world in a humble capacity, he has steadily 
worked his way upward, advancing step by step, and each forward step has brought 
him a broader outlook and wider opportunities. He has wisely used the chances 
which have come to him, his sound judgment recognizing their value, and throughout 
his entire business career he has readily discriminated between the essential and the 
nonessential, thus being able to use the former to its full value. 



EDWARD MONAHAN. 



Edward Monahan is a partner of James P. Monahan of the well known firm 
of Monahan Brothers, plastering contractors of Chicago. Louisiana claims him 
among her native sons, his birth having occurred in the city of New Orleans on the 
27th day of July, 1861. He was the eldest in a family of five sons and a daughter, 
whose parents were Mr. and Mrs. John B. Monahan. The family removed north- 
ward from the Crescent City to Joliet, Illinois, and there he acquired a public 
school education. After his textbooks were put aside he turned his attention to 
the plastering trade, which he followed in Chicago until 1890 and was then joined 
by his brother, Jam.es P., organizing the firm of Monahan Brothers, engaging in 
the contracting business, in which field he has since been active. Extended reference 
to the work undertaken by the firm is given in connection with the sketch of James 
P. Monahan above— work that has placed the firm in the front rank in their 
chosen line. 



188 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

Edward Monahan was married at Omaha, Nebraska, in May, 1890, to Miss Mary 
Monahan, of that city. Their union has been blessed with eight children, of whom 
seven are living. Mr. Monahan is most prominently known in trade circles and 
stands as a high type of the progressive Chicago business man. 



N. G. CARLSON. 



N. G. Carlson, although born across the water, has been a resident of the United 
States from the age of five years. His birth occurred in Sweden on the 30th of 
August, 1853, and when a little lad he was brought to America by relatives, having 
previously been left an orphan. He accompanied his relatives to Rockford, Illinois, 
where he lived for several years and later was a resident of Sycamore, Illinois, and 
afterward of Piano, this state. In those various cities he attended the public schools 
and thus qualified for life's practical and responsible duties. After his textbooks 
were put aside he began learning the moulder's trade, which he followed for twenty- 
two years. In 1893 he became a resident of West Pullman but prior to this time, 
while living at Piano, he had acted as assistant in the Owens undertaking establish- 
ment and had thus gained some knowledge of the business in which he is now en- 
gaged. On taking up his abode in West Pullman he purchased the undertaking 
business of Mr. Dorran, acquiring this business on the 16th of September. The 
parlors were then located at No. 623 West One Hundred and Tw^entieth street and 
in 1915 a removal was made to 614 West One Hundred and Twentieth street, where 
he occupies a two-story building twenty-five bj' one hundred and twenty-five feet, 
containing a show room and a chapel which will seat about seventy-five people. 
His establishment is lacking in none of those things which make for the successful 
conduct of the business. Mr. Carlson has added to his equipment an auto hearse and 
a limousine. He is now a member of the firm of N. G. Carlson & Son and the firm 
has membership in the Chicago Undertakers Association and became identified with 
the Chicago Motor Liverymen's Association upon its organization. 

On the 2d of July, 1870, Mr. Carlson was united in marriage to Miss Nellie 
Olson, who was born in Sweden but became a resident of Chicago when eighteen 
years of age. The children of this marriage are as follows. Abbie, the eldest, is 
the wife of H. A. Adler, who is auditor for the International Harvester Company 
and resides at West Pullman, where they are rearing their family of three children. 
Carl E. is engaged in the undertaking business in St. Cloud, Florida, and is married 
and has one son. Sadie is the wife of Harry C. Newton, of West Pullman, who 
is traveling for the Cadillac Refining Company, and they have one son. Arthur 
died at the age of thirteen years. Bert died in infancy. Albert E. is engaged in 
business with his father. He was graduated from the public schools and since 1907 
has been a member of the firm under the style of N. G. Carlson & Son. He married 
Charlotte M. Pierce, of West Pullman, and they had one child, Albert, who died 
in 1917, when but a j^ear old. Hilda, the youngest member of the family, is the 
wife of B. H. Lloyd, of West Pullman, and they have three sons. 

Mr. Carlson is well known through fraternal relations, holding membership in 
Fides Lodge, No. 812, A. F. & A. M., in the Order of the Eastern Star, in West 
Pullman Lodge, No. 817, I. O. O. F.. in the Rebekali lodge and the Modern Wood- 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 189 

men camp. He is also connected with various Swedish organizations and he and 
his family are consistent members of the First Congregational church. In politics 
he is an independent republican. His son, Albert E., is also a member of Fides 
Lodge, No. 84.2, A. F. & A. M., and the Modern Woodmen, while both are members 
of the West Pullman Business Men's Association and the father is identified with 
the West Pullman Improvement Association. Both father and son stand for all 
those interests which are most worth while in the public life of West Pullman 
and cooperate heartily in many well defined plans and projects for the general good. 



CHARLES SAMUEL DENEEN. 

Charles Samuel Deneen, the first governor of Illinois who in thirty years has 
been elected for a second term, was born in Edwardsville, this state, May 4, 1863, 
his parents being Samuel H. and Mary F. (Ashley) Deneen. He represents one 
of the oldest Illinois families. His great-grandfather, Risdon Moore, was a native 
of Delaware and from Georgia came to St. Clair county, this state, in 1812. He 
had previously served as a soldier of the Revolutionary war. On coming to Illinois 
he brought with him all of his slaves, but after reaching his destination at once 
gave them their freedom. He figured prominently in the public life of the territory, 
became one of the political leaders and was speaker of the Illinois house of repre- 
sentatives in the territorial legislature in 1811. Following the admission of the 
state into the Union he served as a member of the first general assembly and again 
in the third and fourth assemblies. In the legislature of 1823 he was one of the 
most active in opposing the calling of a constitutional convention for the purpose 
of changing the constitution and making this a slave state. He was one of the two 
men who signed a minority report in opposition to that movement and also demanding 
the total abolition of slavery, this occurring forty years before Abraham Lincoln 
wrote the emancipation proclamation. Because of this, on his return from the 
legislature, he was burned in effigy by his opponents at Troy, Madison county, but 
at the following election was again chosen as a free state member of the Illinois 
house of reiiiesentatives. 

The Rev. William L. Deneen, grandfather of the Governor, was born at Bedford, 
Pennsylvania, October 30, 1798, came to Illinois in 1828 and was for nineteen years 
a Methodist minister in the southern part of the state. On account of illness in 
1847 he was obliged to discontinue public speaking and took up the profession of 
surveying, serving as county surveyor of St. Clair county from 1849 until 1855. 
His death occurred in 1879. His son, Samuel H. Deneen, father of Charles S, 
Deneen, was born near Belleville, St. Clair county, Illinois in 1835, but was reared 
in Lebanon and was graduated from McKendree College. He afterward served for 
thirty years as a professor in that college, holding the chair of Latin and ancient 
history. During the Civil war he served as adjutant in the One Hundred and 
Seventeenth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and filled the office of United States consul 
at Belleville, Ontario, under President Harrison. He wedded Mary Frances 
Ashley, a representative of one of the oldest families of Lebanon, Illinois, where 
she was born December 18, 1836 her father being Hiram K. Ashley of that place. 

Governor Deneen spent his youthful days under the parental roof, his early 



190 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

education being acquired in the public schools of Lebanon and su23plemented by a 
course in McKendree College, from which he was graduated in 1882. When a boy 
he had to work upon his father's farm and parental authority attempted to develop 
in him habits of industry and diligence. It is told that on one occasion he emulated 
the example of the renowned Tom Sawj^er when his father arranged that he should 
cut and cord a certain amount of wood for a stipulated sum. He gathered together 
all of his boy friends who needed money and hired them to do the work at so much 
per day. A few days later the father found the work had been done, and the son 
was several dollars the richer because of the money he had cleared from the labors 
of the other boys. This ability to manage others has characterized his entire life. 
When still a young man he determined upon the practice of law as a life work and 
studied at nights in an interior Illinois county, providing for his own support in 
the meantime by school teaching, which profession he followed for three terms in 
the country schools near Newton in Jasjoer county, and for two terms near Godfrey, 
Madison county. He came to Chicago in 1885 and started to complete his law 
studies in the Union College of Law, now the Northwestern Law School. But ere 
he had mastered the full course his money gave out and he attempted to obtain a 
position as clerk in a law office. For days he sought employment of this character 
but no one needed his services. Finally he was offered a position in St. Paul, at a 
meager salary and he spent a short time there, after which he returned to Chicago 
and became a teacher in the public night schools, while the day was devoted to the 
pursual of his law course. His first law office Avas a most unpretentious one, con- 
taining only a few much worn books, a desk and two chairs. Clients, too, were slow 
in coming and to keep busy he defended prisoners who were without counsel. ^Months 
passed thus and the experiences there gained stood him in excellent stead when he 
became states attorney. Slowly but surely he worked his way upward, manifesting 
ability that at length won wide recognition. In the early daj's he would not always 
contend that his client was not guilty but he would at times contend that sufficient 
evidence had not been brought out to prove him guilty. This line of reasoning 
brought to Mr. Deneen no little success and eventually led to his retention as counsel 
in cases of greater importance. At length his ability brought him to the position of 
prosecuting attorney and this office proved the stepping-stone to the higher positions 
which he has since filled. When he took the oath of office it had almost become a 
l^roverb that the criminal with any influence could escape. Mr. Deneen, however, 
announced that he would administer the duties of his office according to law and 
that an indicted man, no matter what his social position, financial standing, his 
religion, his politics, or his race, must stand trial. When his assistants were ready 
to present to the grand jury the case of George W. Spalding, president of the Globe 
Savings Bank and treasurer of the State University, Mr. Deneen called them into 
conference. One said: "I think we'd better try to have Spalding indicted on the 
one count — it's the strongest against him." Mr. Deneen asked: "How many counts 
are there against him?" and received the answer: "Twenty-five." Came the quick 
reply: "Present every count to the grand jury." Mr. Deneen was prosecuting 
attorney when the case of Edward S. Dreyer, treasurer of the West Chicago park 
commissioners, came up. It was a bitter fight and the case went to four higher 
courts, being twice before the supreme court of Illinois and finally was taken to the 
United States supreme court, where opinions were sustained resulting in conviction. 
Equally representative of Mr. Deneen's methods was his prosecution of a candidate 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 191 

on the same ticket with him in 1900, thereby imperiling in the minds of the party 
leaders the success of the ticket at the polls. When this was said to Mr. Deneen he 
replied: "It may not be expedient but it is right." And with Charles S. Deneen to 
believe in the right of his position is to follow it. 

In the early days when Mr. Deneen was waiting for practice he became inter- 
ested in politics. At first it was a local interest that brought him to leadership in 
his ward and led to his election to the state legislature in 1893. The position which 
he took concerning certain vital questions has since made him a factor in national 
as well as state affairs, and he is again and again called to Washington in consulta- 
tion with the heads of the party concerning the situation in the middle west. He 
proved himself as forceful and as resourceful as a state leader as he had in the office 
of attorney for Cook county. He received his party's nomination for governor in 1901 
and during the campaign announced himself as the supporter of an enactment of a 
constitutional amendment to enable the general assembly to pass special laws for 
Chicago ; the civil service law to be applied to the state penal and charitable institu- 
tions and the rehabilitation of the state charitable institutions, together with the 
enactment of a compulsory primary law. At the close of his first term, in the face of 
strong factional opposition, he was again nominated and reelected, and that he has 
stood by his campaign pledges is indicated in the fact that during his administration, 
which now covers six years, legislation has secured the direct primary law, municipal 
courts for Chicago, a state highway commission to encourage good roads, a state 
geological commission for the study of state resources forestry preserves have been 
provided for, a state dental board has been created, safety appliances are required 
on railroads and inspectors provided for the placing of children in homes and pro- 
viding for their visitation. The state has also been divided into insane districts and 
the county insane have been taken over by these districts. Legislation has also led 
to the adoption of a local option law; employers have been required to report all 
accidents to employes ; an act requiring the protection of men employed in structural 
work; an act for the registration of nurses; coal mining laws were revised demanding 
the examination of all miners ; a two-cent passenger rate law was passed ; an act 
requiring the state treasurer to turn the interest on state money over to the state ; 
a law regulating motor vehicles ; an act giving the state food commission the right 
to inspect all foods ; the west park commission authorized to issue three million 
dollar bonds ; an internal improvement commission created and deep waterway 
legislation begun; an act providing for an industrial insurance commission; an act 
providing for educational commission to revise all school laws ; legislation revising 
and improving insurance laws ; north park commission authorized to issue one 
million dollar bonds for small parks ; a law authorizing the city of Chicago to fix 
rates and charges for gas and electricity for power, heating, lighting and other 
purposes ; a negotiable instrument act ; the revision of the practice act ; an act to 
suppress mob law; an act to prevent policy playing; and thirty state buildings 
were either built or remodeled. 

On the 10th of May, 1891, Governor Deneen was united in marriage to Miss Bina 
Day Maloney, of Mount Carroll, Carroll county, Illinois. Their children are four 
in number namely: Charles Ashle}', Dorothy, Frances and Bina. The wife and 
mother was educated at the Frances Shimmer Academy of Mount Carroll. Gover- 
nor Deneen is the idol of his family circle and spends his happiest hours with his 
wife and children. Mr. and Mrs. Deneen hold membership in the Methodist church 



192 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

and in a quiet, unostentatious, yet effective way he aids in the church work and in 
various charitable movements. Well poised and with imperturbable spirit, the 
shafts of political enmity glance off, leaving him unharmed, and while there has 
been nothing spectacular in his life history and in his administration, it is doubtful 
if any of his predecessors have left the office with more genuine friends and admirers 
than Governor Deneen now has. 



NEIL J. O'HANLEY 



Neil J. O'Hanley, one of the well known undertakers of the south side, was 
born in Canada on the 22d of September, 1877, and is a son of John and Mary 
(McDonald) O'Hanley. The mother died in Canada. In his native province Neil 
J. O'Hanley spent the days of his boyhood and youth and completed his education 
by a high school course. He was reared to farm life and early became familiar 
with the labors that fall to the lot of the agriculturist. In 1898 he crossed the 
border into the United States, making his way to Chicago, where he was employed 
in marine service for three years. He afterward secured a position in the under- 
taking establishment of Patrick Murphy, of this city, with whom he remained for 
six months, and later he returned to London, Canada, where he was engaged in the 
undertaking business for six years. In 1907 he again came to Chicago and es- 
tablished business at No. 6507 Cottage Grove avenue, where he continued until 
1913, when he erected his present building at 6535 Cottage Grove avenue. This is 
a two-story structure, twenty-five by one hundred and eight feet, with a garage in 
the rear. He has three automobiles and his establishment contains a chapel with 
a seating capacity for one hundred. 

In 190i Mr. O'Hanley was united in marriage to Miss Annie Prendergast, of 
Seaforth, Ontario, and they have five children: Louis, Joseph, Allan, Mary and 
Margaret. The religious faith of the family is that of the Catholic denomination 
and they belong to the Holy Cross church and Mr. O'Hanley is identified with the 
Knights of Columbus, the Catholic Mutual Benefit Association, the Foresters and 
The Maccabees. He also has membership in the Chicago Undertakers Association 
and the Chicago Motor Liverymen's Association. Politically he is an independent 
democrat. He is identified with the Woodlawn Business Men's Association and is 
in sympathy with the jalans of that organization to look after the welfare and 
interests of that section of the city and further its substantial growth and develop- 
ment in every possible way. 



JOHN SPAFFORD FIELD. 

The subject of this sketch reached his present high positions through no favors 
of influential friends. He worked his way up from the bottom rung of the commer- 
cial ladder, by sheer energy and marked ability. Descended from a long line of 
honorable ancestors, he represents manj^ admirable qualities and able talents, as a 
result of the spirit of progress which has animated his entire career. John Spafford 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 193 

Field was born at Beloit, Wisconsin, August 11, 1817, a son of Spafford C. and 
Martha Ann (Durgin) Field. 

He received his education in the Beloit public and high schools, and at the age 
of fourteen, secured employment with the pioneer dry-goods concern of Chicago, 
Cooley, Farwell & Company, remaining there about one year. He afterward went 
to Colorado and was in business with his father and brother on a cattle ranch herd- 
ing cattle and roughing it. In 1867 he returned eastward, locating at Chicago, and 
entered the ice business in the employ of W. H. Swett & Company, continuing with 
them until 1879, when they sold their business to Shedd Brothers, Mr. Field becom- 
ing a partner in the firm of E. A. Shedd & Company. In 1885 they organized the 
Knickerbocker Ice Company, of which he became vice president and general man- 
ager. In 1898, the capitalization of the company was increased, and thirty-five 
other existing ice companies were absorbed by purchase, Mr. Field being elected 
president of the new corporation. Mr. Field at the present day holds the following 
important offices: President of the Knickerbocker Ice Company; president of 
Eastern Indiana Company; president of The Consumers' Company; director in the 
Ottumwa Pure Ice Company and director in several western subsidiary lines of the 
New York Central and Hudson River Railroad Company; director of Illinois 
Manual Training School Farm, and a trustee of Central church. He is a director 
of the Glenwood school, of the Charity Hospital, and was a director of the first 
board of the Chicago Commons, one of the most important social settlements of the 
middle west. 

Mr. Field is a member of the Union League, Chicago Athletic, Illinois Athletic, 
Calumet, Mid-Day and South Shore Country Clubs all of Chicago; the Oconomowoc 
Country and the Oconomowoc Yacht Clubs, of Oconomowoc; and the Lawyers' Club 
of New York city. 



ALBERT H. LOEB. 



Albert H. Loeb, vice president and treasurer of Sears, Roebuck Sc Company, 
was born in Rockford, Illinois, February 18, 1868, a son of Moritz and Johanna 
(Unna) Loeb. He acquainted himself with the fundamental branches of learning 
in the public schools, passing through consecutive grades until he became a high 
school pupil in Chicago, while later he entered the Johns Hopkins University at 
Baltimore, Maryland, completing a classical and economic course in 1887. He made 
good use of his time and opportunities during his student days and after the com- 
pletion of his college course he accepted the position of teacher in the evening schools 
of Chicago. At the same time he devoted his days to the study of law and was 
admitted to the bar upon examination by the supreme court in 1889. He at once 
entered upon practice, becoming senior partner in the firm of Loeb & Adler, a con- 
nection that was maintained until 1901. Within that period of years INIr. Loeb 
continued in the general practice of law and his comprehensive understanding of 
legal principles enabled him to successfully conduct many important cases. 

At length, however, he determined to withdraw from the profession and concen- 
trate his energies upon commercial interests, becoming in 1901 the secretary of 
Sears, Roebuck & Company. He filled that position continuously until 1908, when 



194 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

he was elected vice president and treasurer. His business ability is manifest in the 
success of this mammoth establishment. For ten years he has had voice in its manage- 
ment, cooperating with his fellow officers in all the well formulated plans for the 
development of the business. His legal knowledge has stood him in good stead in 
this connection, and that he possesses in large measure that quality which has been 
termed commercial sense is evidenced in the results which have followed the execu- 
tion of his well formulated plans. 

]\Ir. Loeb resides with his family at No. 5017 Ellis avenue. He was married 
in Chicago, on the 26th of April, ISQl, to Miss Anna Bohnen, and unto them have 
been born three children: Allan M., Ernest G. and Richard A. 

Mr. Loeb gives his political allegiance to the republican party and ever keeps 
well informed on the questions and issues of the day but has no aspiration in the 
way of office holding. He is prominent in the Masonic fraternity, having attained 
the thirty second degree of the Scottish Rite in Oriental Consistory. He is also 
widely known in club circles, his membership being with the City Club, the Standard, 
Ravisloe and Lake Shore Country Clubs. For pastime he indulges in golf and 
chess and is also possessed of marked literary taste, spending many of his most 
pleasant hours among the men of master minds represented in his library. He thus 
keeps in close touch with the world's thought and is familiar with writers of past 
as well as present ages. 



MRS. LOUISA SMITH. 



Comparatively few women enter the undertaking business, but Mrs. Louisa Smith 
has demonstrated woman's adaptability for any line to which she turns her attention, 
for Mrs. Smith is successfully conducting an undertaking business at No. 1211 East 
Forty-seventh street, having been identified with the trade since 1910. Mrs. Smith 
is a native of New Orleans and in that city was graduated from the public schools. 
She came to Chicago in 1893 and in 1907 became interested in the undertaking busi- 
ness, acting as lady assistant in several of the well known undertaking establish- 
ments of Chicago. It was prior to her removal to Chicago that she was left a widow. 
Her only son, Charles T. Haywortli Smith, died on Thanksgiving day of 1911. He 
dropped dead on the street without apparent cause when only twenty-three years of 
age. Only seven weeks before he had graduated from Roosevelt Hospital of New 
York city, at which time he was given the diploma that granted him the right to the 
use of the M. D. degree. Mrs. Smith is now rearing an adopted son, Edward Neary 
Smith. 

As stated, it was in 1910 that Mrs. Smith entered the undertaking business on 
her own account, forming a partnership with Robert K. Sloan. In 1911 she began 
business indei^endently at No. 605 East Forty-third street, and in May, 1917, she 
jourchased a home at No. 1211 East Forty-seventh street and there opened under- 
taking parlors. She is the only lady in Chicago with a city and state undertaker's 
license. Her parlors will seat about two hundred people, so that funerals may there 
be held with all the privacy that could be had in any home. She has splendid equip- 
ment for carrying on the business and she specializes in the conduct of ladies' and 
children's funerals. She is doing M^onderful work in this connection, and added to her 




MRS. LOUISA SMITH 



THE NEW VOKK 
PUBLIC LIBIIAIIY 



ASTOU, I.KNOX AND 
TILDE.N FOLlNbAT Af.NS 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 197 

business ability and executive force are the tact, kindliness and tenderness which are 
regarded preeminently as a woman's attributes. Her patrons are always ready to 
speak a good word for her and her business is steadily growing. 



LEVI ZEIGLER LEITER. 

Levi Zeigler Leiter typified in his active business career the commercial energy 
of Chicago. He was one of those who foresaw the greatness of the city and who 
were willing to stake all that they had on its growth and prosperity. Not only is 
the rapid development of Chicago considered one of the wonders of the world but 
also the remarkable progress of some of her business men, whose rapid attainment 
of wealth awakens the wonder and excites the admiration of all mankind. Notably 
prominent among these was Levi Zeigler Leiter, whose fortune was founded upon 
an aptitude for successful management, recognition and utilization of opportunity 
and that keen business discernment which precludes the possibility of a wrong move. 
In the legitimate channels of trade he laid the foundation for his success and not 
only builded thereon an immense fortune but also an honored name. There is no 
Chicagoan that is not proud of the record of Levi Zeigler Leiter. The little town 
of Leitersburg, Maryland, was his birth j^lace and his natal year was ISSi. The 
town was named in honor of his family, his ancestors being of the old Calvinistic 
Dutch stock. Liberal educational advantages were afforded him and he made his 
initial step in the business world as a merchant, being thus early attracted to that 
field in which he was destined to win wide distinction, high honors and a colossal 
fortune. Ere leaving the Atlantic coast he became interested in general merchan- 
dising, but when eighteen years of age sought the continual expanding opportunities 
of the growing west, reqognizing the fact that with the natural trend of emigration 
westward the great Mississippi valley would in time become the stage of intense 
industrial and commercial activity. A brief period was spent at Springfield, Ohio, 
where he entered the store of Peter Murray, a prominent merchant of that city, 
with whom he remained for a year. This place not furnishing the desired field he v 
continued his way to Chicago, arriving in the summer of 1854. He came to this 
city during one of the most marked periods of rapid growth and development here. 
His early connection with its commercial interests was as a representative of the 
house of Downs & Van Wyck and later he accepted a position with the firm of 
Cooley, Wadsworth & Company, one of the most important of the early business 
houses of the city and the predecessors of the great firm of John V. Farwell & 
Company. For nine years he remained with that house, with which lie was con- 
nected during the financial panic of 1857 and also through the time when the coun- 
try, recovering from its collapse, entered upon an era of business expansion that 
was notable. Among the other employes in the establishment was a young man 
destined to win equal fame as one of Chicago's millionaire merchant princes — 
Marshall Field. The two young men became interested in the business but in 1865 
sold out to John V. Farwell and turned their attention to the conduct of an enter- 
prise of their own. In 1865 they purchased from Potter Palmer the controlling 
interest of the business that had grown up under his management and at the same 
time took an option on the remainder of the stock. The business was then carried 

Vol IV— 11 



198 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

on under the firm name of Field, Palmer & Leiter. During the latter part of 1866 
Mr. Leiter and Mr. Field exercised their option of the unpurchased interest of Mr. 
Palmer and on January 1, 1867, the latter retired from the firm which then became 
known as Field, Leiter & Company, remaining so until 1881, Avith a resulting pros- 
perity unparalleled in the history of trade. It is a notable fact that the house of 
Field, Palmer & Leiter had as its controlling jjartners three men whose names stand 
as the synonym of marked business enterprise, resulting in the achievement of almost 
marvelous success. The first, continuing in mercantile lines, became not only Chi- 
cago's foremost merchant but the head of the largest department store in the world, 
Avhile Mr. Leiter and Mr. Palmer turned their attention to real estate and with the 
growth of the city became the largest holders of business property therein. Early 
in his career Mr. Leiter showed consiDicuous traits of character that made his life 
brilliantly successful. It is true that, like other business men, he did not find all- 
days equally bright. Indeed, in his commercial experience he saw the gathering of 
clouds that threatened disastrous storms but his rich inheritance of energy, determina- 
tion and adaptability enabled him to turn defeats into victory and j^romised failures 
into brilliant successes. The' great fire of October, 1871, totally destroyed the 
establishment of Field, Leiter & Company, the site of their building being in the 
midst of a great burned area that also included the site of the property in which 
Mr. Palmer had made extensive investments. But, even facing a situation which 
seemed to their friends to mean bankruptcy, each undertook the task of retrieving 
his lost possessions and their success is a part of the business history of Chicago. 
]\Ir. Leiter was active in rebuilding the store, which was soon developed along a 
more extensive and expansive plan than ever before. For ten years after the fire 
he remained a factor in the owoiershiiD and control of the mercantile business as a 
partner of Mr. Field and then withdrew to concentrate his energies upon real-estate 
operations. He also became a factor in banking circles, for from the time of its 
organization Mr. Leiter was a director and one of the heaviest stockholders of the 
Illinois Trust & Savings Bank. After the great fire of 1871 when so many were 
damaged by loss of insurance capital Mr. Leiter was instrumental in inducing 
the Liverpool, London & Globe Insurance Company to reestablish its agency in 
Chicago and also to make this one of its departments, thus giving confidence to 
other reliable companies to do likewise and enabliug property interests to secure 
safe protection against the hazard of fire. Then, too, on severing his connection 
with merchandising he found liberty to employ his time in such things as were of 
greatest interest and pleasure to him. With his family he traveled extensively and 
while abroad added to his art treasures, which in time became almost priceless. 
He also promoted his own knowledge of science and letters and became the possessor 
of one of the finest private libraries in the world. Then, too, he had opportunity 
to aid in the work of general progress through avenues of various organized efforts. 
Few men have seemed to realize more fully the obligations and responsibilities of 
wealth. Philanthropic, humanitarian and nonsectarian interests received his care- 
ful consideration and generous support. He was for many years a director of the 
Chicago Relief and Aid Society and carefully studied out the most practical and 
helpful methods for the distribution of charity. He did not believe in that indis- 
criminate giving which fosters A'agrancy and idleness, but when convinced that aid 
would be worthily bestowed no one was more generous to respond to the need of 
the individual or the communitv. The American Sabbath School Union was also 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 199 

one of his favorite instrumentalities of good to his fellowman because of his belief 
that early training constitutes the foundation for later character development. Nor 
were his efforts confined to the relief of the poor and the religious instruction of the 
young. He was a thorough believer in that higher education which comes through a 
cultivation of the arts and a knowledge of the world's work. He was the second 
president of the Art Institute of Chicago and he was one of the most active and 
helpful members of the Chicago Historical Society. At a time when most people 
thought such an organization was of little value because of the almost wholesale 
destruction of historical records in the fires of 1871 and 1874, he stood by the society 
and bent every energy to its further upbuilding. His large means as well as 
his great business sagacity were enlisted in manj' worthy enterprises and his iden- 
tification with a movement or project not only insured success but carried weight 
and prestige as great as could be found in Chicago. Of temperate habits and strong 
physique, with great powers of application and endurance, Mr. Leiter in his active 
business career confined himself so closely to his business that he was enabled to 
dispose of an enormous amount of work, which an ordinary man could not have 
approached. He never sought nor held jjublie office but from boyhood was a diligent 
student of politics in its highest sense, and few if any men possessed a wider range 
of intelligence concerning the principles of our government and of legislation affect- 
ing the welfare and industries of our country. He was the first president of the Com- 
mercial Club and a leading member of the Iroquois, Chicago, Calumet, Union, Wash- 
ington Park and Union League Clubs. 

In 1866 Mr. Leiter was united in marriage to Miss Mary Theresa Carver, a 
daughter of Benjamin Carver, who was a native of Mohawk, Herkimer county. New 
York, and came to Chicago in the latter '50s. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Leiter were born 
a son and three daughters: Joseph, a Chicago capitalist; Mary, deceased, wlio was 
the wife of Lord Curzon and thus vicereine of India; Nancy; and Marguerite. The 
death of Mr. Leiter occurred June 9, 1904, after a residence of a half century in 
Chicago, although in his latter years the cosmopolitan nature of his interests had 
frequently called him elsewhere, much of his time being spent in Washington, where 
his widow now resides. 

At his death the Record Herald said of him: "\^^hile he was preeminently a 
business man his extensive commercial activities and interests did not deter him 
from discharging honorable and zealously the civic obligations that naturally come 
to a man of such ample means. As a director in tlie Chicago Relief and Aid Society 
he did much to relieve sufferings of homeless people after the Chicago fire and his 
work in behalf of the Chicago Historical Society is gratefully remembered by mem- 
bers of that organization." The Tribune said editorially: "Fifty years ago Levi 
Z. Leiter came to Chicago, a city of seventy thousand people, and began clerking 
for small wages. . . . What Mr. Leiter did all Chicagoans know. He owed 
everything to himself and nothing to luck. It was not by accident that he settled 
here. He had what Bagehot calls in speaking of men of business 'a wonderful 
guessing power of what is going to happen' and he guessed correctly that this was 
to be a great business city. He had faith in the growth of Chicago and when he 
came to have money to invest he invested here in land and local enterprises. He 
had the business mind and ability to see opportunities and courage to take advan- 
tage of them. Add to this unbounded capacity for hard work and the result is 
easily imagined. In time the clerk of l8oi became one of the merchant princes of 



200 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

Chicago. In less than thirty years he had accumulated a great fortune and there 
remained to him more than twenty years of life in which to enjoy it as pleased 
him best." Marshall Field paid Mr. Leiter the following tribute: "He and I came 
to Chicago as boys. He showed unusual abilities from the start and as brother 
clerks and partners we were together twenty-five years. Always possessing the 
highest integrity and good judgment he attained the success one would naturally 
expect. He was always a great believer in Chicago, never wanting office yet always 
desiring to imjirove the government." Harlow N. Higinbotham's expression concern- 
ing Mr. Leiter was as follows: "He was a forcible, able and efficient business man 
and was authority in all matters with which he had to deal. He was a man of tre- 
mendous strength of character, unquestioned integrity and strong intellectual ability, 
and one whose judgment was recognized as being of a high plane." Mr. Leiter 
is indeed numbered among those who have been the real founders and promoters of 
the city's greatness and development whose labors have constituted the imiaetus of 
Chicago's wonderful growth, and as long as the history of the western metropolis 
is written so long will the name of Levi Zeigler Leiter be known and honored. 



WILLIAM F. ROGAN. 



Wherever Scotch blood has gone the siiirit of industry and determination has • 
been infused into the life of the community. The sons of Scotland have not only 
figured prominently in song and story but they have been a most potent element for ! 
j^rogress along many lines. Among the citizens of Chicago who have had their | 
nativity in that land of hills and heather is William F, Rogan, who was born in ' 
Scotland on the 17th of October, 1881, his parents being James and Catherine j 
(Dufi) Rogan, who crossed the Atlantic in 1885 and established their home in j 
Buffalo, New York. The father was one of the jDioneer shipbuilders on the j 
Great Lakes and was brought to this country as an expert in that line. In 1890 j 
he removed to Chicago, where he has since made his home, and he is still connected ; 
with shipbuilding, maintaining a foremost place as a representative of that industry. 

William F. Rogan, sjiending his youthful days under the parental roof, devoted 1 
his time largely to the acquirement of an education and following his graduation from ■ 
the Gallistel school he entered the South Chicago high school, in which he com- i 
pleted the regular course. He afterward learned the shipbuilding trade under the ! 
direction of his father and followed it until 1908, when he pursued a course in I 
the Barnes School of Embalming and for one year was in the employ of John j 
Carroll's Sons. In 1909 he established business on his own account at No. 10051 | 
Ewing avenue in a building with twenty-five feet frontage and two stories in height ■ 
belonging to his father. The first floor is used for the undertaking business and the , 
second is fitted out as a comfortable and attractive apartment, which he occupies. 
His undertaking establishment contains a chapel with a seating capacity of sixty. 
His equipment for the conduct of the undertaking business is thoroughly modern 
and his patronage has steadily grown. He belongs to the Chicago Undertakers As- i 
sociation and to the Chicago Motor Liverymen's Association and is also well known ' 
as a member of the East Side Business IMcn's Association. 

On the 21st of June, 1916, Mr. Rogan was united in marriage to Miss Margaret 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 201 

Hauf, of Chicago, and to them has been born a daughter, Margaret Elizabeth. The 
parents are members of St. Francis De Sales Catholic church and are identified with 
various church societies. Mr. Rogan belongs also to the Knights of Columbus and 
to the Catholic Order of Forresters and he also has membership with the Knights 
of The Maccabees. His political endorsement is given to the democratic party 
and he is interested in all those questions which are of vital concern to community, 
commonwealth and country. 



VICTOR F. LAWSON. 



Quiet and unassuming in manner, there is perhaps no man in Chicago who has 
exercised a more widely felt or beneficial influence in the city than Victor F. 
Lawson because of the initiative spirit which he infused into modern journalism 
and because of his indorsement of measures and projects, the value of which time 
has proven. An onlooker to the extent of studying the public and its attitude 
concerning every significant or vital question, he has at the same time been a worker 
in the field of progress when his broader vision and keener insight have enabled 
him to understand a situation and to present it in such a manner as to change the 
current of public thought, feeling and action. 

Mr. Lawson was born in Chicago, September 9, 1850. His father was for 
man^r years a most successful operator in real estate here and, provided with liberal 
educational advantages, the son supplemented his public-school course by study in 
Phillips Academy at Andover, Massachusetts. Returning to his native city, he 
took charge of his father's estate and in its control manifested the business quali- 
ties and insight which have characterized his management of the Daily News. On 
becoming connected with the paper he initiated movements that have had far- 
reaching influence over modern journalism. He was the pioneer in the publication 
of low-priced newspapers and his foresight supplemented by undaunted energy 
and management have gained him fame and fortune. When all the leading Chi- 
cago dailies were selling for five cents Melville E. Stone, Percy Meggy and William 
E. Dougherty began the publication of the Daily News on January 1, 1876. It 
was a struggle to establish the enterprise upon a paying basis and Mr. Meggy 
and Mr. Doughertj^, becoming discouraged, sold their interests six months later 
to Mr. Stone, who in turn disposed of the entire property to Mr. Lawson. Later, 
however, Mr. Stone again became the owner of a third interest and joined with 
Mr. Lawson in the project of making the Daily News a success. It meant to this 
enterprise what it does to every other of magnitude in its upbuilding. Mr. Stone 
took charge of the editorial department while Mr. Lawson managed the business 
interests, and after a few years the Daily News became not only the foremost 
journal of Chicago but had a circulation in excess of that of any other paper. In 
March, 1881, the proprietors began the publication of a morning edition, called 
the Morning News, which name was afterward changed to The Record. On the 
retirement of Mr. Stone in 1888, Mr. Lawson became sole proprietor and thereafter 
directed the editorial jaolicy as well as the business departments of the two papers. 
Both steadily increased in circulation until March 28, 1901, when Mr. Lawson with- 
drew from the morning field, selling The Record to the Chicago Herald. The con- 



202 - CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

centration of liis work on one paper has redounded very greatly to the advantage 
of the Daily News. Employing none of the methods of yellow journalism. Mr. 
Lawson has^ nevertheless, instituted many progressive measures, which have set 
the standard for other newsjoaper jjublications. Surrounding himself with an able 
corps of assistants in the department of financial management and with a corps 
of writers who are experts in their particular field, he has given to Chicago and 
the country at large a paper which in its several daily issues brings the public 
into almost immediate contact with events of local, national and international inter- 
est in the moment of their transpiring. It has never been the policy of the paper to 
dole out measure for measure in value ; on the contrary, it has been an almost 
prodigal bestowal of the best intelligence, and the high standards maintained have 
been educative, initiative, reformative and uplifting. From the policy outlined at 
the beginning there has been no deviation, the only increased activity resulting in 
a larger field of usefulness, a broader view and more comprehensive results in 
promoting knowledge and molding public opinion. Untrammeled by party ties, 
pledged to the support of no coterie or of any designated movement, the Daily 
News, under the direction of Victor F. Lawson, stands for that which is just 
and that which is progressive, recognizing no class distinctions or party lines save 
where the interests of the whole have fostered. 



HUGH CRAIG. 



Hugh Craig is the editor of the N. A. R. D. Journal, a publication of great 
interest and benefit to the trade. He is a man free from ostentation — direct, earnest, 
purjjoseful. enjoying life and its opportunities whether along business or recreative 
lines or in the circle of a constantly broadening friendship. He was born in Virginia 
on the Slth of March, 1879. He describes his boyhood in the following characteristic 
manner: "In closely succeeding years gathered sassafras, turpentine for plasters, 
and other domestic remedies for the paternal domestic establishment; peddled sticky 
flypaper from door to door at age of eleven years; apprenticed in pharmacy in 1898." 
After acquainting himself with the drug trade Mr. Craig continued active in that 
field much of the time until 1906, when he became a member of the editorial staff 
of The Druggists Circular and has since been largely connected with trade papers. 
In 191 i he was made director of publicity for the National Association of Retail 
Druggists and editor of its official publication, known as the N. A. R. D. Journal. 
The publication of this magazine was begun under the name of N. A. R. D. Notes, 
but in 1914 the name was changed to the Journal. It was edited by Charles M. 
Carr from 1903 until 1914. when Mr. Craig was called to the editorship of this 
publication, which has a circulation of thirteen thousand. It is issued weekly and 
contains on the average, forty-eight pages. It is the official organ of the National 
Association of Retail Druggists and is the largest advertising factor in the drug 
trade. It is the only weekly published by the retail drug trade and has direct con- 
nection at Washington, D. C siDccializing in legal advice and price information. 

At different t.imes in his career there have come varied experiences into the life 
of Mr. Craig, who has concentrated his attention upon farming, cow punching, book- 
keeping, the ^le of newspapers, law work, civil and mechanical engineering, and 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 203 

general journalistic work. In this concise list may be traced the steps in his ad- 
vancement. He is a wide reader and a deep thinker, and while he has acquired 
considerable knowledge in public and private schools and colleges, as well as from 
private reading, he has also gained valuable information in the school of experience, 
constantly adding to life's lessons in that way. While he minimizes his own powers 
and accomplishments, his friends do not do so. The Chicago Veteran Druggists' 
Association in its twentieth anniversary volume spoke of him as "a man of substan- 
tial attainments and the {iosition he now honors is proof of his character and ability." 
Mr. Craig turns to fishing for recreation and is never happier than when as a 
disciple of Izaak Walton he takes his rod to some lake or stream, where his skill 
can outwit the members of the finny tribe. He never neglects any public or private 
duty, however, for recreation and his concentration of purpose enables him to ac- 
complish much in moments when other men would think the time at their command 
would not be worth the effort of attacking any task. 



MARTIN OTTO. 



Martin Otto, engaged in the undertaking business, was born in Chicago, March 
15, 1868^ and is a son of John and Louisa (Gosen) Otto, both of whom were natives 
of Holland. In childhood days they crossed the Atlantic and became residents of 
Chicago, where they were reared and married. The father engaged in the wall 
paper and paint business on the west side for a number of 3"ears, but his life's 
labors were ended in death in 1878. His widow survived him for a long period, 
passing away in 1910. 

Martin Otto acquired a public school education in Chicago and after his text- 
books were put aside learned the furniture finishing trade, working for an uncle 
in a furniture store. Afterward his uncle, Garrett Otto, established an undertaking 
business at Roseland in 1887 and Mr. Otto remained with him and learned the 
business under his direction. The business was carried on under the firm style 
of Otto & Madderom and after a time the senior partner sold his interest to Mr. 
Van der Myde. When Mr. Madderom died his interest in the business was purchased 
by Henry Otto, a brother of Martin Otto, and the firm of Otto & Van der Myde 
was thus formed. The business was thus conducted until 1899, when it was pur- 
chased by Martin Otto, who had been connected with the establishment much of 
this time. The original location was at No. 10916 Michigan avenue and when it 
was purchased by Martin Otto, he erected a building at No. 10928 Michigan avenue 
and established the business therein in 1903. His building is thirty-three and a half 
by one hundred and thirty-four feet and is two stories in height. It contains a 
chapel seating seventy-five people and his equiiiment for the conduct of the business 
is thoroughly modern in every respect. The second floor of the building is used 
as his residence. Mr. Otto belongs to the Chicago Undertakers Association. His 
present place of business was his wife's birthplace, her father having located there 
in 1850, having been one of the first settlers of Roseland. 

It was on the 16th of Februarv, 1898, that Mr. Otto was united in marriag-e 
to Miss Mary KuyjDcr, of Roseland, a daughter of Jacob and Anna (Dyke) Kuyper, 
who were natives of Holland, whence they came to the new world and established 



204 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

their home in Roseland, where Mrs. Otto has spent her entire life. By her marriage 
she has become the mother of two sons, Louis M. and Harold M., aged respectively 
nineteen and thirteen years. 

Mr. Otto is a member of Kensington Lodge, No. 804, A. F. & A. M., and also 
has membership in Fernwood Lodge, No. 23, I. O. O. F., in which he has held all 
of the chairs, and in the Knights of Pythias lodge. His religious faith is that of 
the Reformed church and politically he maintains an independent course, voting for 
men and measures rather than part^^ He belongs to the South End Business Men's 
Association and is ready and willing to aid any movement or project calculated to 
advance the upbuilding, development and interests of his section of the city or to 
promote general welfare. Since starting out in the business world his career has 
been marked by steady progress, for he has wisely used his time, talents and oppor- 
tunities and is today a self-made man whose success is the direct result of his 
earnest and intelligently directed effort. 



THOMAS EDWARD WILDER. 

Thomas Edward Wilder, president of the firm of Wilder & Companj^ leading 
tanners and wholesale jobbers of leather, was born in Lancaster, Massachusetts, 
August 15, 1855. His parents, Charles Lewis and Harriet Ellen (Harris) Wilder, 
were both representatives of old New England families of English origin who traced 
their ancestry back to William the Conqueror, the ancestral home of the paternal 
line being Sullham House and Purely Hall, England. The father was prominent 
in New England affairs and was a large manufacturer, being connected with the 
house of Chickering & Sons, and also owning cotton mills in Lancaster in addition 
to other '^xtensive interests throughout the United States. The mother of Mr. 
Wilder was the daughter of a prominent manufacturer, but both parents are now 
deceased. 

As a pupil in the public schools and the Lancaster Academy, Thomas Edward 
Wilder pursued his preliminary education and afterward entered upon a course of 
mechanical engineering in the Worcester (Mass.) Polytechnic Institute, from which 
he was graduated with the Bachelor of Science degree. He is now a trustee of that 
institution and the only member of its board who is not a resident of the state. 

Mr. Wilder never followed the profession for which he had qualified and, after 
teaching school for about a year in New England, came to Chicago in 1875, where 
he secured a clerical position with Walker, Oakley & Company, well known tanners. 
His experience in this line and his laudable ambition to enter upon an independent 
business career at length led him to establish a leather commission business in 1878 
under his own name, and in the following year he entered into partnership relations 
for the manufacture of cut soles, under the firm name of Johnson & Wilder. This 
was succeeded by Wilder & Hale in 1880 and a reorganization of the business in 
1887 led to the adoption of the present firm style of Wilder & Company, with 
Thomas Edward and John E. Wilder as the partners. The business covers a number 
of specialties, for in addition to tanning and wholesale jobbing, the firm manu- 
factures cut soles and shoe bottom stock. For years the Wilder brothers followed 
the cooperative plan in the conduct of their business with the best financial and 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 205 

most harmonious results, making it a practice to see that their employes prospered 
with them. In December, 1906, they announced a dissolution of partnership, issu- 
ing the following statement: "The purpose of the dissolution is for the formation 
of a stock conipau}', the better to enable the recognition of meritorious service ren- 
dered by the young men who will become interested in the new company as stock- 
holders and directors, and,. besides such, to recognize in a profit sharing proposition 
those whose service and loyalty to the business may warrant. " On the 2d of Janu- 
ary, 1907, Wilder & Company was transformed into a corporation, with Thomas 
Edward Wilder as president. In addition to acting as president of this company, 
Thomas Edward Wilder is vice president of the Wilder-Manning Tanning Company 
of Waukegan, Illinois, and chairman of the board of managers of the J. W. & A. P. 
Howard & Company, Limited, of Corry, Pennsylvania, tanners of sole leather. In 
February, 1908, he was elected general secretary of the Chicago Association of Com- 
merce, which he had aided in organizing and which he has been connected with con- 
tinuously as a member of its board of directors, executive, publicity, waterways or 
other important committees. He has cooperated in many of its most effective move- 
ments for the benefit and welfare of the city and his efforts have been most effec- 
tive in obtaining good results. 

At all times and in all connections Mr. Wilder is recognized as a public-spirited 
citizen, one who has the interests of his community and of his country at heart. He 
is now a director of the Great Lakes District of the National Rivers and Harbors 
Congress and of its executive committee of five he has been a member for the past 
year. In view of this office as well as of his position as chairman of the waterways 
committee of the Chicago Association of Commerce, he has been very active in 
promoting the great project of a deep waterway from the Great Lakes to the 
Mississippi valley. His keen insight into situations has enabled him to realize the 
vast possibilities of such a project, and he believes that it will be fully accomplished 
within the span of his life. He held for several terms the presidency of the Cut Sole 
Leather and Tap Association of the United States. He is now a director in the 
National Association of Tanners and was formerly vice president of the Chicago 
Shoe and Leather Association. 

In 1880 occurred the marriage of Mr. Wilder and Miss Anna G. Tucker, a 
daughter of William F. Tucker, of Chicago, and the children born unto them are as 
follows: Marjorie, now the wife of William H. Emery, who is engaged in leather 
manufacturing; Edward Tucker and Erskine Phelps, who are associated with their 
father in business; Harold, a successful lumber merchant of Portland, Oregon; Paul 
and Harris Emery, who are still at home. Mr. Wilder's greatest pride has been in 
the education of his children. The daughter prepared for Smith College at the 
Burnham School of Northampton and was graduated from Miss Capen's School for 
Girls at Dobbs Ferry, while the three elder sons are graduates of Cornell, where 
the fourth is now a senior. The youngest son, being now only eleven years of age, 
is still a pupil in the public schools. The family are prominent socially in Elmhurst, 
where they have long resided, and in the public activity of that community Mr. 
Wilder has been greatly interested. He served as president of the school board at 
Elmhurst and has cooperated in many measures for the general good. His political 
allegiance has ever been given to the republican party and his religious faith is that 
of the Unitarian church. He was president of the New England Society of Chi- 
cago, has been president of the Elmhurst Golf Club and belongs to the Union 



206 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

League Club. In his business career he has made continuous progress, and at the 
same time he has always found time, notwithstanding his large individual interests, 
to attend to his public duties, which have ever been most faithfully and capably dis' 
charged. 



FRED D. DOTY. 



The present crisis in world affairs is constituting a standard by which all men 
are gauged. They are proving their loyalty or giving a demonstration of their 
lack of it. Fred D. Doty is numbered among those who have been active in further- 
ing various movements, plans and projects which have back of them the interests 
and welfare of the country or of the military forces who are representing this 
land and during the recent drive of the Young Men's Christian Association did most 
important work in that connection in Kensington, where he makes his home. He is 
a native son of Detroit, Michigan, born March 31, 1873, and is a son of Duane and 
Margaret (Richards) Doty, who came to Chicago in 1875. The father was a well 
known educator, serving as superintendent of schools in Detroit, after which he 
became identified with the public school system of Chicago, acting as school super- 
intendent in tliis city for several years. Later he became agent for the town of 
Pullman, where he passed away in 1902. He was a civil engineer by profession 
and was well qualified for work of that character, being a graduate of the Michigan 
State University at Ann Arbor. Both he and his wife have now passed away. 

Fred D. Doty jjursued a public school education in Pullman and from early 
manhood was employed by the Pullman Palace Car Company, occupying a position 
in the accounting dei^artment. Later he spent four years upon the road as a con- 
ductor for the Pullman Company and in 1903 he financed the undertaking business 
established by the firm of G. H. Woodward & Company. The following year he 
purchased Mr. Woodward's interest in the business, of which he then assumed the 
management. The vmdertaking parlors were located at No. 2458 Kensington avenue, 
in Kensington, and in 1910 a removal was made to No. 214 East One Hundred and 
Fifteenth street, in a building erected especially for the purpose. It is a structure 
twenty-five by one hundred feet and two stories in height and Mr. Doty occupies 
the second story as a residence, it having been fitted out as a modern and attractive 
apartment. His store contains a chapel with seating capacity for seventy-five. In 
addition to splendid equipment for doing all kinds of undertaking work Mr. Doty 
has his own auto equipment, including a hearse and automobile. 

On the 6th of February, 1902 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Doty and 
Miss Helen M. Johnson, of Lapeer, ^lichigan. They have no children of their 
own but have an adopted son, George, who is twenty-two years of age. He was in 
business with his father until after the outbreak of the present war and is now in 
field hospital work with the United States Army. He attended the St. Cyril Catholic 
school, graduated at St. Louis Academy and attended also St. Ignatius College. 

Mr. Doty is a member of Palace Lodge, No. 765, A. F. & A. M. ; of Pullman 
Chapter, No. 204, R. A. M; and Palace Chapter, No. 265, O. E. S. He likewise 
belongs to Calumet Lodge, No. 94, K. P.: Prosperity Lodge, No. 782, I. O. O. F. ; 
Columbia Encampment, I. O. O. F.; the Knights of The Maccabees; and the Tribe 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 207 

of Ben Hur. He is also connected with the Sons of America and along the lines 
of his profession he is connected with the Chicago Undertakers Association and the 
Chicago Motor Liverymen's Association. In politics he is a democrat and his 
religious faith is that of the Episcopal church. His personal characteristics are 
such as make for popularity. He possesses a pleasant, genial disposition, a kindly 
(manner and unfailing courtesy, and all who know him speak of .him in terms of 
high regard. 



• HON. LYNDEN EVANS. 

Hon. Lynden Evans, attorney at law of Chicago and present member of con- 
gress from the ninth district, was born in La Salle, Illinois, June 28, 1858, a son 
of Judge Daniel and Emma Lynden (Ryder) Evans. The ancestry of the family 
is traced back to the time when William Penn came to America to establish and 
organize the province of Pennsylvania, representatives of the Ryder family also 
coming at that time. When the Revolutionary war was in progress Henry Evans 
was active in the service of the Continental army under Washington and rose to 
the rank of brigadier general. He was mustered out with that rank at the close 
of hostilities and became a member of the Society of the Cincinnati. Lynden Evans 
is numbered among his descendants of the fifth generation. Daniel Evans, for 
many years a prominent and honored resident of La Salle county, Illinois, served 
as probate judge at Ottawa and has had large personal acquaintance with many of 
the distinguished men whose names figure conspicuously on the pages of Illinois 
history. He was a friend of both Lincoln and Douglas and during the progress of 
the Civil war a presidential appointment made him war consul in Spain, his special 
duty being to watch for the departure of vessels which might be in the service of , 
the Confederates. He is still living at the advanced age of eighty-four years. I 

Lynden Evans, a boy at the time of his father's consular service, spent five 
years with him abroad — from 1863 until 1868 — and acquired a knowledge of several I 
foreign languages. Following his return to this country he entered Knox College 
at Galesburg, Illinois, and was there graduated with the class of 1882. Following 
the completion of his college course Lynden Evans engaged in teaching school in 
La Salle and in Evanston, Illinois, from 1882 until 1885, and in the meantime 
entered upon the study of law, his careful preparation enabling him to win admis- 
sion to the bar in 1884. He practiced as a member of the law firm of Barnum, Evans 
& Barnum, from 1888 until 1891, and later was senior partner of the firm of Evans 
& Arnd, but in recent years he has practiced alone. He is systematic and careful 
in the preparation of cases, painstaking and thorough, and his comprehensive knowl- 
edge of the law has been manifest in logical argument and in well prepared briefs. | 
He is the author of Illinois Overruled Cases and also of Cases Distinguished, Lim- 
ited and Expanded. Moreover he is known in the educational field, being a lecturer 
on constitutional law at the John Marshall Law School of Chicago. 

Mr. Evans has brought the same thoroughness to bear in the study of political 
conditions, questions and issues and his clear and forceful discussion of the prob- 
lems now before the country has led to his selection for leadership in political affairs. 
On the 10th of November, 1910, he was elected to congress on the democratic ' 



208 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

ticket. As he expresses it^ he is "an old-fashioned democrat," believing thoroughly 
in the constitution and in the conduct of government affairs for the benefit of the 
marjiy. He also believes in lowering the present tariff, "not with an ax but with 
jackscrews." 

In 1896 at Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, Mr. Evans was united in marriage to Miss 
Bonnie Withrow, a daughter of the late Judge Thomas F. Withrow, who was gen- 
eral counsel for the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad at the time of his 
death in 1893. Mrs. Evans shares in her husband's interest in the vital questions 
of the day, especially those political, economic and sociological problems which are 
of significant interest in the present age. They reside at No. 124-0 Astor street, 
and one of the attractive features of their home is a well selected library, Mr. 
Evans' interests run mainly to history and his interest herein is from the ethical 
point of view. He finds greatest pleasure in such works as Lecky, De Tocqueville 
and Von Hoist, which indicates his preference for a history written from the view- 
point of the people and not from that of the rulers. He is also a collector of "first 
editions," especially of the novels of Sir Walter Scott, of which he possesses a 
complete set. In addition to their Chicago residence Mr. and Mrs. Evans have a 
most attractive summer home, owning a country place at Pelican Lake, not far from 
Rhinelander, Wisconsin. Mr. Evans is much interested in forestry and devotes 
himself to clearing land in the vicinity of his place, performing the work with his 
own hands and thus becoming an adept in wood-chopping after the manner of the 
well known recreative exercises of the great Gladstone. Mr. Evans has had his 
summer residence built principally of heavy logs, its sills being of logs three feet 
in diameter. It is in this home that he spends his summer vacations. He belongs 
to the University Club of Chicago, to the Iroquois Club, the City Club and the Ger- 
mania Maennerchor and to the Chicago Bar Association and the American Bar 
Association, and outside of his home finds his closest companionship with the men 
who feel more than a superficial interest in the great problems of the age. 



ARTHUR E. FECHTER. 

Arthur E. Fechter is proprietor of a large drug store at No. 521 North Clark street 
and is one of the enterprising business men of the trade. He was born in Mani- 
towoc, Wisconsin, on the 11th day of June, 1862, and is a son of George W. and 
Mar}^ Fechter, Avho were pioneer residents of Manitowoc, where the father was 
engaged in general merchandising for many years. 

Arthur E. Fechter acquired a public school education in his native city and 
after his textbooks were put aside started upon his business career as a clerk in 
a drug store there. He afterward went to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where he spent 
eight months as an emploj^e in a wholesale drug house and on the Sd of November, 
1881, he came to Chicago, where he entered the employ of Lewis Mather, with 
whom he continued until July, 1884. He then embarked in business on his own 
account, opening a drug store on Canalport avenue and Jefferson street. This 
business he sold on the 1st of June, 1909, and purchased a store at No. 521 North 
Clark street, it being the old Stoltz & Grady store, one of the landmarks in the 
drug trade in the city. He has a corner store thirty by sixty feet and carries 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 209 

an extensive stocky doing a large prescription and general drug business but having 
no soda fountain. He employs four people and his trade has constantly increased. 

On the 18th of October^ 1893, Mr. Fechter was united in marriage to Miss 
Bertha E. Becherer, of Buffalo, 'New York, and they have one daughter, Sylvia, 
at home. Mr. Fechter belongs to Arcanum Lodge, No. 717, A. F. & A. M., also 
to Wylie M. Egan Chapter, No. 126, R. A. M., Chicago Commandery, No. 19, 
K. T., and to Medinah Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He is also connected with 
the Elks Lodge No. 4 and he belongs to the Wisconsin Society of Chicago and also 
to the Retail Drug Club, the Veteran Druggists Association, the Chicago Retail 
Druggists Association and the Illinois Pharmaceutical Association. He is interested 
in all that has to do with the trade, its development and progress, and his success 
is the merited reward of persistent and earnest effort intelligently directed. His 
political allegiance is given to the republican party where national questions and 
issues are involved, but he casts an independent ballot at local elections, considering 
the capability of the candidate for the office which he seeks. Mr. Fechter owes 
his success entirely to his own efforts and one of the elements of his advancement 
is the fact that he has always continued in the line in which he embarked in starting 
out on his career. He has thus concentrated his efforts along a single field of 
activity and there is no feature of the drug trade with which he is not familiar. 
He holds to high trade standards and has ever been careful to conform his business 
to the most advanced commercial ethics. 



JAMES E. BROWN, 



James E. Brown, who for many years was a well known figure in undertaking 
circles in Chicago, passed away May 15, 1916. He was at that time only in his 
forty- fourth year, his birth having occurred in Chicago, Sej^tember 8, 1872. He 
was a graduate of St. Patrick's parochial school, after which he attended Rush 
Medical College until the death of his father. He was a son of James T. and 
Bridget (Maloney) Brown, the latter a native of Chicago, while the former came 
to this city in young manhood. After completing his education James E. Brown 
accepted the position of clerk of the court under Judge Slund. He afterward went 
to Iowa, where he was employed for several years in his uncle's furniture factory, 
and later he pursued a course in the Barnes School of Embalming and in 1898 en- 
tered the undertaking business at Whiting, Indiana, where he remained for a year. 
On the expiration of that period he removed to South Chicago, establishing business 
at Ninety-fourth street and Commercial avenue. It was about that time that a 
street car hit his service wagon and he was badly injured, his leg bone being splin- 
tered, so that it caused a permanent lameness. He afterward removed to 9037 
Commercial avenue, where he conducted business up to the time of his demise. 

On the 19th of February, 1908, Mr. Brown was united in marriage to Miss Sara 
McLean, of South Deering, Illinois, a daughter of George and Mary (Kelly) 
McLean, who were early settlers of Chicago. Mr. and Mrs. Brown became parents 
of a son, James E., Jr. ]\Ir. Brown adhered to the Catholic faith and was a member 
of the Knights of Columbus, also of the Catholic Order of Foresters, in which he 
was chief ranger at one time. He belonged to the Knights of The Maccabees, 



210 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

the Tribe of Ben Hur^ the Columbian Knights, the Modern Woodmen of America 
and to St. Patrick's Catholic church. His jjolitical allegiance was given to the 
democratic party. Along the line of his jarofession, he was well known and was an 
active member of the Chicago Undertakers Association and the Illinois Undertakers 
Association. 

Since her husband's death Mrs. Brown has carried on the business and on the 
20th of November, 1916, removed to 9500 Commercial avenue, where she has a 
beautiful place with a twenty-five foot frontage. She is a licensed embalmer, having 
taken out a license in 1913, and she continues the work established by her husband. 
Mr. Brown died as the result of an infection in the hands caused by the care of 
a nine-year-old child and the treatment of the hands drove the infection into the 
spine. Mrs. Brown was infected while caring for her husband, but the serum 
treatment was applied and she recovered. Two nurses, eight physicians and two 
specialists were called in to care for her husband but without avail. He was a 
man widely known and loved by all and his death was the occasion of deep regret 
to those who had been associated with him. He had many sterling traits of char- 
acter and his genuine worth gained him the enduring friendship of those with whom 
he came in contact. 



ALBERT DICKINSON, 



With a nature so determined and resourceful as to enable him to retrieve losses 
for which he was entirely unaccountable and then upon the foundation of a good 
name build up a business of mammoth proportions, Albert Dickinson is classed with 
the leading representative business men of Chicago where he is conducting one of 
the largest seed houses in the world as the president of the Albert Dickinson Com- 
pany. The story of his life in its successful achievement, where difficulties and 
obstacles have seemed to serve but as an impetus for renewed effort, is an interesting 
one. He was born at Stockbridge, Massachusetts, October 28, 1841, and his 
parents, Albert F. and Anne Eliza (Anthony) Dickinson, were also natives of west- 
ern Massachusetts. They came to Chicago with their family in 1855, the father 
having established a grain and produce business in this city the previous year. 

Albert Dickinson was at that time a youth of fourteen years and he at once 
entered the public schools, completing the course in 1859, with the first class that was 
graduated from the Chicago high school. He then became his father's associate 
in business but put aside commercial and personal interests at the outbreak of the 
Civil war in order to join the army. The smoke of Fort Sumter's guns had scarcely 
cleared away when, in April, 1861, he became a member of Company B, of the Chi- 
cago Light Artillery, known as Taylor's Battery but afterward as Company B, 
First Regiment, Illinois Light Artillery. His military service covered three years 
and three months, during which time he particijaated in the engagements at Fred- 
erickstown, Missouri, Fort Donelson, Shiloh, the siege of Corinth, Chickasaw Bayou, 
Arkansas Post and Vicksburg. The batterv was then sent to Memphis with Sher- 
man's army and afterward moved up to Chattanooga taking part in the battle of 
INIissionary Ridge and the relief of General Burnside at Knoxville. Mr. Dickinson 
also participated in the Atlanta campaign until honorably discharged in July, 1861<. 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 211 

The military chapter in his life history closed, Albert Dickinson became a resi- 
dent of Durant, Iowa, where he engaged in buying grain for a year, but his father's 
failing health recalled him to Chicago, after which he actively participated in the 
conduct of the business at this point until, with hundreds of others, the firm suffered 
heavy losses in the disastrous fire of 1871. They faced the situation of an indebted- 
ness of several thousand dollars, occasioned by a mortgage which was incurred to 
pay for the new warehouse. They realized nothing from the insurance which they 
had carried on the property, but with resolute and determined spirit Albert Dickin- 
son and his brother Nathan attempted the upbuilding of the business, and following 
the removal to Kinzie street their sister Melissa became their bookkeeper and their 
brother Charles, then but fifteen years of age, joined them in the enterprise, and 
the united efforts of brothers and sister triumphed over the difficulties and obstacles 
which confronted them, met the liabilities of the father which had formerly been 
incurred and placed the business once more upon a pajnng basis. From that time to 
the present the enterprise has grown steadily until the Albert Dickinson Company 
controls one of the largest seed houses in the world. With the growth of the 
business larger quarters were necessary and a removal was made from No. 136 
Kinzie to No. 117 Kinzie street, and soon afterward the adjoining building at No. 
119 was secured. A few years later quarters were secured at No. 113 Kinzie street, 
as well as 104 to 110 Michigan street, and the Empire warehouse on Market between 
Van Buren and Jackson streets was also added to their storage facilities. Still 
later, with the continuous increase of business, another on the railroad tract, at Six- 
teenth and Clark streets was secured, when the Kinzie, Michigan and Market street 
warehouses were given up. For many years they had been using the property of 
the Chicago Dock Company for storage purposes, and in 1889, obtained control of 
the company mentioned. The local plants of the comjoany now occupy six hundred 
and ninety feet on Taylor street, four hundred feet on the river and two hundred 
and sixty-feet front on Clark street (the Clark and Sixteenth street warehouses), 
comprising the most modern office facilities, storage and wharfage accommodations 
and up-to-date mechanisms for the handling of goods. Not only has the business 
so expanded as to necessitate this great increase in the accommodations of the local 
plants, but branches have been established at Minneapolis, Minnesota, and Boston, 
Massachusetts. 

A general commission business was continued by the firm until 1874, when a 
cash basis was adopted as the foundation of their business transactions and they 
began limiting their operations exclusively to seeds. In 1888 the business was 
incorporated as a stock company, capitalized for two hundred thousand dollars, with 
Albert Dickinson as president, Charles Dickinson as vice president and Nathan 
Dickinson as treasurer. There has been no change in the presidency to this writ- 
ing, in 1910, Albert Dickinson remaining as the chief executive officer of a business 
which has grown to mammoth proportions. He has not limited his eftorts, how- 
ever, to this field, for he has become an executive in several other important cor- 
porations in which he holds considerable stock. 

Mr. Dickinson holds stanchly to the principles of the republican party at 
national elections, with independent proclivities when called to exercise his right of 
franchise in local affairs. He holds membership in George H. Thomas Post No. 5, 
G. A. R., and is further identified with the club life of this city as a member of 
the Illinois, Chicago Athletic, Union League and South Shore Country Clubs. He 



212 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

has long been deeply interested in the welfare of the Chicago Academy of Sciences 
and is concerned in many matters relative to the city's progress and improvement 
along educational, social and municipal as well as material lines. As the architect 
of his fortunes he has builded \visely and well upon the sure foundation of unfalter- 
ing enterprise, indomitable perseverance and energy that never flags. 



JUDGE KIRK HAWES. 



Few lawyers have made a more lasting impression upon the bar of the state, 
both for legal ability of a high order and for the individuality of a personal char- 
acter which impresses itself upon a community, than did Judge Kirk Hawes. Of 
a family conspicuous for strong intellects, indomitable courage and energy, he 
entered upon his career as a lawyer and such was his force of character and nat- 
ural qualifications that he overcame all obstacles and wrote his name upon the key- 
stone of the legal arch of Illinois. Moreover, where the general interests of society 
were involved through political movements or public projects, he stood for the rights 
of the whole peojale, for clean government, for fidelity in office and for the adop- 
tion of principles which secure not only temporal welfare but look beyond the 
exigencies of the moment to the possibilities of the future. His mind, extremely 
judicial in character, enabled him to understand, as few have done, both sides of a 
question, and his opinions therefore partook of the nature of a judicial judgment. He 
came to Chicago in the year which chronicled the close of the Civil war — at that time 
a young man of twenty-six years. His birth had occurred at Brookfield, Worcester 
county, Massachusetts, on the 5th of January, 1839, his parents being Preston and 
Fanny (Oles) Hawes. He was descended from one of the old American families, 
his great-grandfather having been a minuteman of the Revolutionary war. His 
father, who devoted his life to farming, was a man of keen intellect whose opinions 
constituted an influencing factor over public thought and action in his community. 
Mrs. Mary Jane Holmes, the well known novelist, was a sister of Judge Hawes, 
and the intimate and affectionate relations that existed between them and the others 
of the family throughout all the years was a strong feature of their lives, each 
rejoicing in the success and prominence of the other. 

Farm life with its experiences and the acquirement of an education in the 
public schools claimed the attention of Judge Hawes until he reached the age of 
fourteen years, when, desiring to see something of the world, he went to sea, his 
first voyage taking him from Boston to Hong Kong. As a member of the crew 
of one of the American clipper ships he visited all of the jirincipal seaports of the 
world, gaining thereby a broad and intimate knowledge of lands and people and 
gathering the experience which enabled liim in later years to correctly judge 
of men and their motives. Three years were devoted to seafaring life, during 
which time there came to him a recognition of the need of a more liberal educa- 
tion and after completing a preparatory course he entered Williams College, therein 
continuing his studies until after the outbreak of the Civil war. He was at that time 
in his junior year. The sjairit of patriotism burned bright witliin him and putting- 
aside his text-books, he raised a company, of which he became first lieutenant. 
Enlistments, however, were slow and, relinquishing his commission, he went to 




KIKK HAWEW 



THE NEW voi;:. 
PUBLIC LIIUIARY 



ASTOR, LEN'OX AND 

TILDKN FOCNUATlu.NS 
L 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 215 

Boston, where he joined the Forty-second Massachusetts Infantry as a private. 
The regiment was assigned to the command of General Banks and participated 
in the Red River campaign and later in the siege of Vicksburg, resulting in the 
surrender of that city on the 4th of July, 1863. 

Judge Hawes was then honorably discharged and, resuming his studies in 
Williams College, completed the classical course in 1861 with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts. In the meantime he had determined upon the practice of law as his life 
work and he pursued his reading for a year under the direction of the firm of 
Baker & Aldrich, leading attorneys of Worcester, Massachusetts. He continued 
his studies in the law office of Waite, Towne & Clark of Chicago, arriving in this 
city in 1865, and the following year, passing the required examination, was admitted 
to the bar. Soon afterward he became a partner in the law firm of Hawes & Helm, 
a relation that was maintained until early in 1871. He then formed a partnership 
with an old classmate and former law student of Worcester under the firm name of 
Hawes & Lawrence, this association being maintained until Mr. Hawes was elected 
judge of the superior court of Cook county in 1880. The morning after the great 
fire of 1871 the law firm of Hawes & Lawrence is said to have had the only law 
library in Chicago — about one thousand volumes which were saved from the flames 
by the large fireproof vault of their Clark street offices. He came to his profession 
with good equipment, bringing to the starting point of his legal career eloquence 
of language and a strong personality, combined with those qualities indispensable 
to the lawyer— a keen, rapid, logical mind, plus business sense, and a ready capacity 
for hard work. The thoroughness with which he prepared his cases, the analytical 
trend of his mind and the readiness with which he grasped the points of an argument 
combined to make him a strong advocate, while his broad legal learning was a 
salient feature in his ability as a counselor. 

He came into the public life of Chicago at a time when practically every citizen 
took a deep interest in political affairs, when the policy of the nation was as yet 
unformulated owing to the exigencies of civil war. He became a student of the 
signs of the times, of the great and grave problems which confronted the people, and 
his keen insight and clear opinions placed him with the leaders of the republican 
party, the princii>les of which he strongly espoused. He continued ever an interested 
student of the vital questions of the day and in the presidential campaign of 1880 
was associated with Robert G. Ingersoll, Leonard Swett, Emery A. Storrs and 
other prominent Illinois republicans, in an organized opposition to the nomination 
of President Grant for a third term, resulting in the seating of the contesting 
Illinois delegates, whereby the final result in the national convention was brought 
about. Tliis led to Judge Hawes receiving the indorsement of Wilbur F. Storey, 
editor of that strong democratic organ, the Chicago Times, M'hen the former became 
a candidate for judicial honors, and the influence of the paper secured to him a 
strong democratic support that combined with the republican vote which was 
naturally given him, gained for him the largest majority of any of the judicial 
candidates, running far ahead of his ticket. Reelection continued him on the bench 
from 1880 until 1892 and he was then defeated in the democratic landslide of the 
latter year. In this connection it has been written of him: "It was as judge of the 
superior court that the strong individuality of Judge Hawes and his exceptional 
abilities as a lawyer and student reached their greatest usefulness, as the records 
of the many important cases he was called upon to try during these twelve years 

VoL IT— 12 



216 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

most conclusively show. In the performance of the exacting judicial duties of that 
high office, at a time when there were fewer judges than we now have, he was, as 
he ever had been, a hard worker. Business in his court was always dispatched with 
promptness and yet -with that care that made for justice, as clearly appears from 
the decisions of the courts of last resort in Illinois when his decisions as a trial judge 
were presented for review. Abrupt in manner, he was ever an attentive listener to 
both sides of controversy and would without the slightest hesitation brush aside the 
mere technicalities of the law, for which he had much less respect than for sub- 
stantial merits. He had strong convictions of what was right and wrong and was 
entirely fearless of criticism and public opinion when he believed he was right. 
These characteristics were frequently the subject of comment, both at the bar and 
in the public prints, from one of which the following is quoted: 'A few more men 
like Judge Kirk Hawes, with intelligent opinions and backbone enough to enforce 
them, are needed on the bench when matters of public import like the election fraud 
cases come to trial.' It is a matter of local history that his prompt and thorough 
investigation of a jury-bribing plot in his court that affected several men in high 
places not only won for him the thanks and respect of the public but effectually 
put a stop to such corruption in Chicago for some twenty years." 

Had Judge Hawes' activities never reached beyond the field of jurisiDrudence 
his great work in that line would entitle him to grateful remembrance and honors. 
In other connections, however, he sought the benefit of the public and his efforts 
were resultant. An interested and active member of the Grand Army of the Republic, 
he was untiring in his efforts to secure for the federal soldiers and Chicago the 
public library site and the Soldiers' Memorial Hall on what was formerly Dearborn 
Park. He accomplished his end after years of hard work and special legislation 
at Washington and Springfield, and there now hangs in the memorial hall a 
splendid painting of Judge Hawes — a fitting tribute to the memory of one through 
whose efforts the building came into existence. He was prominently mentioned as an 
available republican candidate for governor of Illinois but his ambition was not 
in the field of office-holding. He was a prominent member of the Union League, 
Marquette and Twentieth Century Clubs of Chicago and at one time a member of 
the Calumet Club but afterward withdrew. He also belonged to the Les Cheneaux 
Club near Mackinac Island, of which he was president, his summer home being 
on Marquette Island. Lie was a charter member of the Chicago Bar Association 
and his real standing at the bar is perhaps best indicated in the high regard and 
honor entertained for him by his fellow members of the profession. 

On the 26th of June, 1871, Judge Hawes was married to Miss Helen E. Dun- 
ham, a daughter of John H. and Elizabeth (Hills) Dunham, who in 18 hi came 
to Chicago, where Mr. Dunham was long prominent in mercantile circles and as 
the first president of the Merchants Loan & Trust Company. To Judge and Mrs. 
Hawes were born a son and three daughters: John Dunham; Florence, the wife 
of Arthur J. Chivers, of London, England; Levanche D.; and Fanny V. Judge 
Hawes greatly enjoyed outdoor life and after retiring from the bench sojourned 
several months of each year at his summer home on Marquette Island. He was 
an admirer of art and a lover of music and could play almost any instrument. 
Because of the innate refinement of his nature he rejected ever^'thing opposed 
to good taste. The simplicity of his daily life, as seen in his home and family 
relations, constituted an even balance to his splendid intellectual powers, resulting 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 217 

in the attainment of eminence in connection with the practice of law. His mem- 
ory was exceptionally retentive and his conversation was often enriched b}' allusion 
to his experiences as a seaman in early life, and in later years he became an 
authority and ready writer and lecturer on the ancient history of Egypt and 
the Holy Land, to the study of which he devoted much time. He was a prominent 
member of the Second Presbyterian church yet his views on religion were liberal 
and he realized that no one organization contained all the truth but that all were 
seeking to understand and interpret the purposes of life fully and truthfully. He 
died September 8, 1904, only a iew moments after expressing his appreciation of 
the beauty of the autumnal foliage and of the expanse of the waters of Lake Huron. 
His life was rich in its friendships and he held friendship inviolable. While his 
interest centered in his home, he had that breadth of character which enabled him to 
understand and sympathize with humanity and even in his work in the courts he 
would rather stimulate the individual to better efforts than to condemn. In this 
way he often tempered justice with mercy and made the law stand for its highest 
purpose — that of reclaiming and saving the individual. 



MATHEW J. KILL. 



Mathew J. Kill, devoting his attention to the undertaking business, was born 
in Chicago, June 9, 1884, a son of Peter and Mary (Scharf) Kill. The father was 
a native of Germany, while the mother's birth occurred in Chicago, her father hav- 
ing been Joseph Scharf, who was one of the early residents of this city. Peter 
Kill, who was born in 1847, arrived in Chicago in 1853, when a little lad of but 
six years, in company with his mother. For twenty years he was employed at the 
stock yards and was also a member of the fire department at the yards. In 1892 
he entered the undertaking and livery business at No. 3906 Wentworth avenue and in 
1893 he erected a building at No. 3932 Wentworth avenue, a two-story structure 
with a frontage of twenty-four feet. There he conducted his undertaking business 
to the time when death ended his labors in July, 1909. He was well known as a 
member of the Royal Arcanum, the Catholic Knights of America and the Mutual 
Protective Association. His religious faith was indicated by his membership in 
St. George's Catholic church. He belonged to the Chicago Undertakers Associa- 
tion, in the work of which he took an active and helpful part. To him and his 
wife were born three children: INIathew J., of this review; Dora, the wife of J. E. 
Ward, a resident of Chicago; and Fred, who died at the age of fourteen years. 

Mathew J. Kill attended the public and parochial schools of Chicago in the 
acquirement of his education and after his schooldays were over entered his father's 
employ. He also attended business college for a year and later in order to further 
qualify for the profession in which he is now engaged he pursued a course of study 
in the Barnes School of Embalming. After the death of his father he took charge 
of the business and has since conducted it, but has abandoned the livery. His 
activities and interests are well directed and his close application to business, his 
unremitting energy and capability are bringing to him well deserved success. He 
belongs to the Chicago Undertakers Association and also to the Chicago Motor 
Livervmen's Association. 



218 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

Mr. Kill is identified with several social and fraternal organizations. He has 
membership with St. George's Catholic church and "wdth the Young Men's Society 
of the church. He is also identified with the Catholic Knights, the Catholic Order 
of Foresters, the Royal Arcanum and the National Aid Union. He is a member of 
the South Side Business Men's Association, which indicates his interest in well de- 
fined plans and projects for the upbuilding and improvement of that section of 
the city. His political endorsement is given to the democratic party and while 
he does not aspire to office he keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the 
day and gives to the party his earnest and unfaltering support. 



A. STARR BEST. 



A. Starr Best is a Chicago merchant whose business is unique in the commercial 
circles of the city, being the only exclusive establishment for the sale of children's 
and infants' apparel. The store, too, situated at the corner of Madison street and 
Wabash avenue, is one of the most attractive in the city in its tasteful arrangement 
as well as in the line of goods carried and the business management of the house 
assures its continued success. 

Mr. Best is a native of Buffalo, New York, born April 25, 1871, his parents being 
Albert and Estelle (Starr) Best. The father was a native of Pine Plains, New 
York, and was the originator of the Lilliputian Bazaar of New York city, remaining 
its proprietor until his death, which occurred April 21, 1899, when he was fifty- 
three years of age. His wife was a native of Kidders Ferry, New York, and is still 
living in New York city at the age of sixty-five years. 

A. Starr Best was the eldest son and the third child in a family of five children 
and pursued his education in the public schools of the eastern metropolis until 
graduated from the high school, at which time he entered business in connection 
with his father, being then a youth of sixteen years. He remained with his father 
until the latter's death and then came to Chicago, in 1901, and purchased the infants' 
apparel store of Dora Schultz. He then founded his present business under 
the name of A. Starr Best & Company, which was changed three years later to 
A. Starr Best. This is the only exclusive house in children's and infants' apparel 
in the west and a business of large volume is carried on annually, while Mr. Best is 
also associated with business enterprises in the east. 

On the 18th of April, 1896, in New York city, was celebrated the marriage of 
Mr. Best and Miss Marjorie Ayres, a daughter of Marshall Ayres, Jr., of whom 
mention is made elsewhere in this work. Mrs. Best was born in Truro, Cape Cod, 
Massachusetts, August 18, 1874, and attended a private school and Smith College 
of Northampton, Massachusetts. She now holds membership with the Association 
of Collegiate Alumnae, Smith Alumnae Association and the Society of Physical 
Research. She is deeply and sympathetically interested in various movements for the 
upbuilding of humanity and the promotion of such knowledge as will work for bet- 
ter citizenship and higher ideals. She was one of the originators of the Drama Club 
of Evanston and while acting as its president became one of the promoters and 
founders of the Drama League of America, of which she has since been the presi- 
dent. This was organized for the promotion and support of good drama and the 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 219 

discouragement of bad plays, and has gained international popularity, having now a 
membership throughout the country of many thousands. Mrs. Best also belongs to 
the First Congregational church of Evanston, and her activities along the lines 
which touch the general interests of society have been of a most practical, helpful 
nature, resultant at all times of good. For fifteen years she has been active in the 
work of the Young Women's Christian Association and for five years after coming 
to Chicago was a member of the national board, carrying the work for the whole 
country. For the past five years she has been a member of the Illinois state board, 
and in both connections has had charge of the finances of the work. Unto Mr. and 
Mrs. Best have been born four children: Marshall Ayres, whose birth occurred 
November 26, 1901; Albert Leonard, born October iS, 1903; Marjorie Starr, born 
April 5, 1908; and Barbara, born October 25, 1910. 

In 1902 Mr. Best established his home in Evanston, residing at 1936 Orrington 
avenue, and has since taken an active part in its local affairs. He is a member of 
the Evanston and Evanston Golf Clubs and of the Union League. He is of social 
disposition and is a lover of hunting, fishing and all outdoor sports. Both he and 
his wife are ardent golf champions, and have played in many matches and tourna- 
ments. He also has an interesting military chapter in his life history, for during 
ten years prior to leaving New York he was a member of Company D, of the 
Seventh Regiment of the New York National Guard, a famous military organiza- 
tion of that state, in which he served as corporal. He was a crack marksman and 
one of the sharpshooters. Throughout his life he has been keenly alive to the inter- 
ests of the present, and while a progressive and prosperous young business man, he 
never allows the commercial instinct to warp his nature or to crush out an interest 
in those activities which are a source of physical and mental stimulus as well as of 
pleasure. Both he and his wife are people of charming personality and are 
extremely popular in social circles. 



IVER L. QUALES. 



Iver L. Quales, actively engaged in the drug business, was born in Chicago, 
October 8, 1872, a son of Dr. Niles T. and Carrie (Lawson) Quales, who were 
pioneer residents of this city. The father was born in 1832 and departed this life 
in 1915. He was one of the first physicians in the Wicker Park section of the city 
and at the time of the Civil war he put aside all business and personal considerations 
and responded to the country's call for troops, doing active work in defense of the 
Union. He is survived by his widow, who yet makes her home in Chicago. Dr. 
Quales was also a surgeon of the Marine Hospital at the time of the Chicago fire 
of 1871. 

In the attainment of his education Iver L. Quales attended the high school and 
afterward entered the Northwestern University as a pharmacy student, completing 
his course in the pharmaceutical department with the class of 1893. He had previ- 
ously served an apprenticeship in the drug line and engaged in clerking until 1895, 
when he opened a drug store at No. 1-iiO Milwaukee avenue, having the oldest drug 
house in that section of the city. He has built up a business of substantial propor- 
tions, utilizing methods which neither seek nor require disguise. His straightforward 



220 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

dealing, his enterprise and his close application have been the salient features in his 
growing success. 

Mr. Quales has attained high rank in Masonry, belonging to Myrtle Lodge, No. 
795, A. F. & A. M.; Corinthian Chapter, No. 69, R. A. M.; St. Bernard Commandery, 
No. 35, K. T. ; and Medinah Temple of the Mystic Shrine. Along the line of his 
chosen vocation he also has several membership connections. Upon the organization 
of the Chicago Drug Club on the 17th of November, 1901, he was elected the first 
president and continued to fill that position for two years. He also belongs to the 
Chicago Retail Druggists Association and formerly served on its executive board. He 
was at one time a member of the executive board of the Illinois State Pharmaceutical 
Association and he belongs to the National Retail Druggists Association and for 
two years has been a member of its advisory committee. He has likewise been con- 
nected with the Veteran Druggists Association since 1914 and he is interested in 
everything that has to do with the welfare, development and progress of the line of 
business in which he is engaged. His political allegiance has always been given to 
1:he republican party since age conferred upon him the right of franchise and for three 
years he served as a member of the board of the West Chicago park commissioners 
but has never been a politician in the sense of. office seeking, preferring to give his 
time and attention to his business interests. However, he is never remiss in the 
duties of citizenship and heartily supports and cooperates in all movements and plans 
for the general good. 



JAMES W. BROOKS. 



James W. Brooks was a resident of Chicago for sixteen years and throughout 
that entire period engaged in the undertaking business. He was born in Connecticut 
in 1851 and his death occurred in this city, July 19, 1905. During his childhood 
days his parents removed with their family to Watertown, Wisconsin, where he 
acquired a public school education. In young manhood he took up the carpenter's 
trade and later he followed merchandising in Watertown, where he built up a large 
business. Removing to Chicago, he opened up an undertaking business at No. 5360 
Wentworth avenue in the spring of 1889, this being one of the first establishments 
of tlie kind in the neighborhood. There he continued in active business up to the 
time of his death and won a liberal and well deserved patronage. He was a member 
of the Royal League, also of the Catholic Order of Foresters, and was a faithful 
communicant of the Catholic church. 

On the '29th of April, 1889, Mr. Brooks was united in marriage to Miss Delia 
Kevlin, a daughter of James and Mary Kevlin, of Long Grove, Iowa, where her 
father is extensively engaged in farming and stock raising. To Mr. and Mrs. Brooks 
were born five children. James William, a graduate of the Northwestern University 
law department and now engaged in the practice of law, is married and has one son. 
Francis X. was graduated from St. Ignatius School and is a student in De Paul 
Academy. The three other children died in infancy. 

Following the death of her husband Mrs. Brooks took up the business and has 
both a state and city license, which she received in 1905, being accorded a city 
license on the 2d of October of that year. She has become an expert embalmer and 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 221 

does all of her own work^ building up a splendid business in that connection. She 
displays excellent business ability and with notable courage as well as energy took 
up the work which her husband laid down when he was called to his final rest. 
Since that time she has made steady progress and her prosperity has come to her as 
the direct result of close application, indefatigable energy and keen sagacity. In 
1917 she began the erection of a building at Seventy-first street and South Park 
avenue, which was completed in August of that year. The building is a three story 
structure sixty-seven by one hundred feet, of pressed brick and terra cotta, with 
mahogany and oak finishings. It is the best building in the neighborhood and is called 
the Brooks building. The undertaking business occupies a space thirty-three by one 
hundred feet and the establishment is modern throughout. There is a beautiful 
entrance with art glass and Mrs. Brooks has not opened a chapel in which to hold 
funeral services but has fitted up the undertaking parlors with furnishings that give 
one the impression of a quiet, refined home, therefore making the rooms peculiarly 
fitted for funeral service. The remainder of the building aside from that used by 
the undertaking business includes eight apartments and a store, from which she derives 
a substantial annual rental. Mrs. Brooks owns an auto hearse and limousine and has 
everything that one can think of in connection with the undertaking business, including 
a large line of supplies for the care and shrouding of the dead. Mrs. Brooks belongs 
to the Chicago Undertakers Association and also to the Chicago Motor Liverymen's 
Association. Her religious faith is that of the Catholic church, her membership being 
in St. Anne's. She is a lady of many admirable qualities and of splendid business 
ability and she has indeed made for herself a most creditable and enviable position 
in business circles. 



SAMUEL WATERS ALLERTON. 

Eighty-three years of age, and Samuel Waters Allerton is still a vigorous, 
active man, although retired from the control of extensive business operations which 
formerly engaged his attention. In matters of public concern as well as in the 
conduct of private enterprises, he has played a leading role on the stage of action 
in Chicago and yet it is not to cities with their commercial, industrial and profes- 
sional activities that he would direct the attention of young men starting in life, 
but to the farm — "the almost certain source of revenue." George Washington 
declared agriculture is the most useful as well as the most honorable occupation 
of man, and in this occupation and its kindred interests — stock raising — Mr. Aller- 
ton laid the basis of his success. His history through several generations has been 
distinctly American in both direct and collateral lines. The progenitor of the 
family in this covintry was Isaac Allerton, who was born in England between the 
years 1583 and 1585, the exact date being unknown. He resided in London for 
some time prior to his removal to Holland in 1609 and came to the new world 
as one of the Mayflower passengers in 1620. It is generally admitted that he 
was the wealthiest of all of the Pilgrims and was one of the few among them 
to whom Bradford, and contemporaneous writers always gave the prefix "Mr.,"' 
which at that time was used as an index of superior family or respectability. He 
was also one of the three upon whom the privilege of citizenship was conferred 



222 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

by the city of Leyden^ his associates in this honor being William Bradford^ after- 
ward governor of the Plymouth colonj^^ and Degory Priest, his brother-in-law. 
He was married in Leyden, September 4, 1611, to Mary Norris, of Newbury, 
England, and they had four children when they embarked on the Mayflower. His 
wife died February 25, 1621, and in 1626 he married Fear Brewster, daughter 
of Elder William Brewster. Her death occurred in 1634', while Isaac Allerton 
died in 1659. 

Samuel W. Allerton of the ninth generation of the family in America was 
born in Amenia, New York, May 26, 1828, a son of Samuel W. Allerton, whose 
birth occurred at Amenia, December 5, 1775. He was married March 26, 1808, 
to Hannah Hurd, who was born in South Drover, Dutchess county. New York, 
the eldest daughter of Ebenezer and Rebecca (Phillips) Hurd, the former an exten- 
sive farmer and stockraiser of Amenia. Samuel W. Allerton, Sr., studied for 
the medical profession but abandoning his plan for the practice of medicine, 
learned the tailor's trade and became a merchant tailor, at the same time con- 
ducting a general store. In 1828 he joined with others in building and operating 
a woolen mill but the litigation of the sheriff in 1833 caused the loss of nearly 
all his fortune. In 1837 he removed westward to Iowa with the hope of retrieving 
his lost possessions but becoming ill, returned to the east. In 1848 he rented 
a farm in Yates county. New York, and six years later purchased land in Wayne 
county, upon which he spent his remaining days. His religious faith was that 
of the Universalist church and he was one of the respected men of his community, 
although he did not seek to figure in public life. He lived to the venerable age 
of ninety-nine years and eight months. 

The youngest of the nine children in his father's family, Samuel W. Allerton 
of this review, was but seven years of age when his father failed in business and 
was a lad of twelve when he began providing for his own support. He remained 
in Amenia until fourteen years of age and in 1842 went to Yates county with 
his parents, giving them the benefit of his services until they were able to buy 
the Wayne county farm. He then joined his brother Henry in renting a farm 
on which they made fifteen hundred dollars, which they gave in partial payment 
for the farm in Wayne county, assuming an indebtedness of three thousand dollars. 
In the cultivation of a rented farm Mr. Allerton saved thirty-two hundred dollars 
and then went to Newark, where he worked with his brothers on their farm and 
also traded in live stock to some extent. On his return from Albany, New York, 
where he had sold cattle, it was found that he and his brother were the possessors 
of three thousand dollars in cash and a farm clear of all indebtedness. They 
divided their interests, Mr. Allerton taking the cash and starting out for himself, 
his brother advising him: "Make a name and cliaracter for yourself and you 
are sure to win." This advice he has ever followed and it has been the substance 
of his admonition to young men since that time. At the end of his first independent 
venture — the sale of cattle in New York — his sales amounted to seven hundred 
dollars. With characteristic energy and determination, however, he continued in 
business and later when he made a shipment of live stock to New York there 
was such a shortage of cattle on the market there that his sales netted him three 
thousand dollars. 

It was about that time that Mr. Allerton heard and heeded the call of the 
west and for a year thereafter engaged in raising and feeding cattle in Fultou 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 223 

county^ Illinois, but like hundreds of others, he was the victim of the financial 
panic which swept over the country at that time. This and ill health occasioned 
his return to the east and with his brother he engaged in merchandising for a 
short time in Newark, New York, but felt that the limits and possibilities in such 
an undertaking were too narrow. Disposing of his interest in the store and bor- 
rowing five thousand dollars, he returned to Fulton count}', and in March, I860,, 
removed to Chicago, from which point he has since conducted his operations. At 
the same time he made further preparations for having a home in the city by his 
marriage at Peoria, to Miss Paduella M. Thompson, a daughter of Astor C. Thomp- 
son, of Fulton county. They became the parents of a daughter and a son: Kate 
Bennett, who was born June 10, 1863, and on the 14th of October, 1885, became 
the wife of Dr. Francis Sidney Tapin. Following his death she married Hugo 
R. Johnson. The son, Robert Henry, born March 20, 1873, is supervising exten- 
sive property interests. Following the death of his first wife, Mr. Allerton wedded 
her sister, Agnes C. Thompson, on the 15th of March, 1882, and their home on 
Prairie avenue has ever been the center of a cultured society circle. 

Mr. Allerton has always pinned his faith to farming and live-stock dealing 
as the surest source of success although he has operated extensively in other fields. 
Fie bought his first cattle shipment in the old Merrick yards on Cottage Grove 
avenue and as the city had no bank he had to depend upon express shipments of 
money from New York. It is well remembered by old time traders that in May, 
1860, upon sharp decline in prices he cornered the market by buj^ing every hog in 
Chicago. He was at that time alone in the city and it was difficult for him to 
obtain; money. Three telegrams, one from his own bank and two from New 
York, however, were regarded as sufficient security on the part of Aiken & Morgan, 
bankers, to secure him a loan at one per cent interest and the profits which accrued 
from that deal constituted the foundation of his fortune. Moreover, the experi- 
ence brought to him a recognition of the need and value of union stock yards and 
better banking facilities in Chicago and he set to work to accomplish both. In 
the '60s there were three stock yards in Chicago. In 1865 he joined with John 
B. Sherman in the agitation of a proposition to combine the interests and that 
their labors were resultant is indicated in the fact that the Union Stock Yards 
were organized in 1866. The wisdom of his judgment being attested in this enter- 
prise and success resulting therefrom, he also became interested in the stock 
yards at Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Jersey City (New York yards), 
St. Joseph and Omaha. For many years he was president of the Allerton Pack- 
ing Company. His early experience with the banks led to his efforts for the estab- 
lishment of the first Chicago bank under the national banking law and he became 
one of the original directors of the First National Bank, in which he still holds 
large interests. There are two things which he saj's he never offers for sale — 
stock in this bank and his Illinois farm lands. His experience bears out the state- 
ment of one who has long given close study to the economic conditions of the 
natural resources of the country and declares that "Illinois farm lands are the 
safest investment in all America." The holdings of Mr. Allerton comprise eleven 
thousand .acres in the Mississippi valley, including farm property in this state, 
Ohio, Iowa, Nebraska and Wyoming. He formerly owned nine thousand acres 
near Monticello, Illinois, known as "The Farms," which is one of the model live- 
stock farms of the world now the property of his son. The home thereon is modeled 



224 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

after the typical residence of the English country gentleman and although every 
acre is tilled to perfection, fine horses, cattle and hogs are the chief sources of 
revenue. Another Allerton property which is ever a source of delight to the 
owner is his summer home at Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, standing in the center of 
two beautiful farms of eighty acres each. In California he maintains his winter 
residence, an old Spanish mission building have been converted into a quaint yet 
elegant home. The business relations of Mr. Allerton in Chicago have been of 
vast benefit to the city. After watching the workings of the cable street car com- 
pany in San Francisco in 1880 he used his influence as a stockholder in the South 
Side Traction System, inducing Sujierintendent Holmes to investigate the cable 
with the result that it was adopted by the street railway companies of the city. 
He is still a director of the Chicago City Railway Company. In addition to act- 
ing as a director of the First National Bank through all these years since its incep- 
tion in 1863, he is a director in the First Trust & Savings Bank, National Safe 
Deposit Company, the Weaver Coal & Coke Company and the North Waukegan 
Harbor & Dock Company, and vice president of the Art Marble Company. He 
has at times made generous division of his wealth for the benefit of mankind, 
one of his chief benevolences being the establishment in conjunction with the late 
Henry E. Weaver of the St. Charles Home for Boys. He was at one time nomi- 
nated by his friends for the mayoralty on the republican ticket but the entire ticket 
suffered defeat in that year. He is a strong protectionist and an advocate of all 
which advances the condition of American labor. He gave efficient aid to the 
World's Columbian Exposition as one of its directors, and has been a cooperant 
factor in much that has worked for the uj^building and benefit of the city along 
various progressive lines. His name is on the membership rolls of the Calumet, 
Union League, Washington Park, Chicago Golf and Marquette Clubs, and he is, 
moreover a member of the Illinois Society of the Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion and the Society of Mayflower Descendants. He is of unemotional nature, yet 
of well balanced character who early learned to correctly judge of life and its 
contacts, of his own capacities and powers and of those things which make up 
life's contacts and experiences. He has ever held to the principle which he has 
again and again enunciated in this fashion "no boy can suceed unless he build 
up a character." He has never theorized much concerning life but has been a 
central actor on the stage. Never an extremist, he belongs to that class who main- 
tain an even balance, never carried away by the chimerical illusions of the opti- 
mist nor moved from a stable center by the dark and depressing views of the 
pessimist. He recognizes the advancement of the world and the obligation of 
the individual to put forth intelligent effort if he would keep pace with universal 
progress. Among his strongly marked characteristics is a democratic manner, a 
manner that always commands respect, preserves dignity and yet never forces 
! onto one the knowledge of his success or prominence. Notwithstanding his pros- 
l perity he is a most approachable gentleman and nothing in his manner or speech 
would ever suggest his wealth. He is today the only Chicago business man who 
1 was contemporaneous with the founders of Chicago's great industries, the Armours, 
"". I Morris, Pullmans, Swifts, Palmers and Fields, with all of whom he had close 
personal acquaintance. No living citizen of Illinois today has done more toward 
the advancement of her agricultural, financial, industrial and general business inter- 
ests than Samuel Waters Allerton. Inheriting a naturally robust constitution. 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 225 

observing the laws of nature throughout a most busy, active life, his reward, in 
addition to magnificent success, is a remarkable preservation of the physical man 
and mental faculties whose keenness is unimpaired. 



JOHN P. BURKE. 



John P. Burke is engaged in the undertaking business, which he is conducting 
under the style of Clifford & Burke. He was born in Ireland in 1864 and was a 
young man of twenty-two years when he came to the United States in 1886. He 
made Chicago his objective point and after reaching this city was engaged in 
railway work, becoming general foreman. He served for fifteen years on the 
Santa Fe Railroad and on the 30th of April, 1902, he was united in marriage to 
Mrs. Clifford, at which time he took over the undertaking business which he has 
since carried on. The firm of Clifford & Burke was established in 1902, succeeding 
to the business of W. E. Clifford, which had been founded about 1892 and which 
was located first at No. 5448 Wentworth avenue. In 1897 a removal was made 
to Nos. 5533 to 5537 Wentworth avenue and in 1911 a new building was erected, 
with a twenty-seven foot frontage, adjoining the old building. Mr. Burke now con- 
ducts a florist store in the old building. He has fifty-four feet frontage in all, with 
a depth of one hundred and twenty-five feet, and the building is two stories in 
height. Mr. Clifford died in the year 1900, at the comparatively early age of 
thirty-two, and his interest in the business was continued by his wife and his father 
until 1902, when Mr. Burke purchased an interest. Mr. Clifford was born in 
Chicago and was a son of Daniel Clifford, a veteran of the Civil war and one of 
the pioneer settlers of Chicago, where he took an active part in public affairs, 
serving at one time as collector of the town of Lake. 

Mrs. Burke is a daughter of David Lillis and Delia O'Connell, the former a 
native of Ireland, while the latter was born in New York. Her father came to 
Chicago in young manhood and was an associate of the father of Governor Dunne, 
a warm friendship existing between them. The family lived in Peoria for some time 
and later settled in Evanston, where her father was married. In 1880 he removed 
to Sixty-third street and Wentworth avenue in Englewood, taking up his abode there 
before the street car line was extended into that neighborhood. He worked for 
the Rock Island Railway Company. In 1888 he removed with his family to 
Fifty-fifth street and Wentworth avenue, where the family home has since been main- 
tained. After a time the original cottage was converted into a store for the under- 
taking business of W. E. Clifford and now the same property is occupied by Mr. 
Burke in the conduct of the business. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Burke have been born two children: John C, fourteen years 
of age; and Helen, aged nine. Mr. Burke belongs to the Ancient Order of Hiber- 
nians, the Knights of Columbus, the Catholic Order of Foresters, the Knights of The 
Maccabees, the Royal League, the Royal Arcanum, the National Union, the North 
American Union, the American Insurance Union and other societies. He is also con- 
nected with the Chicago Undertakers Association and the Chicago Motor Liverymen's 
Association. He belongs to St. Ann's Catholic church and is identified with several 
church societies. In politics he is a democrat. The foregoing will indicate that his 



226 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

interests are broad and varied, and it is well known to all with whom he is acquainted 
that he stands for progress, improvement and advancement along all those lines 
to which he directs his interest. 



CLYDE MITCHELL CARR. 

Clyde Mitchell Carr, well known in connection with the iron and steel business 
in Chicago since 1888, was born in Illinois in 1869, a son of Richard Baxter and 
Margaret Mitchell Carr. The father's people were Virginians, while the Mitchell 
family originally came from Scotland. 

Mr. Carr prepared for Princeton University at the Lake Forest Academy, and 
during the years 1887 and 1888 he attended Northwestern University. After leaving 
college he engaged in the iron and steel business, to which he has since devoted 
his attention, becoming a prominent representative of the iron, steel and machinery 
trade of the country. In 1901 he was admitted to the firm of Joseph T. Ryerson & 
Son, and in 1911 was elected president of the corporation. Mr. Carr is president 
of the Lennox Machine Company, a director in the American Glyco Metal, and other 
manufacturing companies ; director of the Corn Exchange National Bank of Chi- 
t.ago; and of the Chicago Great Western Railroad. 

Mr. Carr was married in Evanston, Illinois, to Miss Lillian Van Alstyne, in 
1894-; in 1897 they lost their only child, Dorothy. Their city residence is on the 
Lake Shore Drive, and their country home in Lake Forest, Illinois. 

Mr. Carr is particularly interested in the educational and artistic development 
in Chicago, and in this connection is a trustee of the Art Institute, of the Thomas 
Orchestra Association and of the Chicago Plan Commission; he is also trustee of 
the Lake Forest University and of the Chicago Bureau of Public Efficiency. His 
name is on the membership rolls of the Commercial, Chicago, Mid-Day, University^ 
Saddle and Cycle, Princeton, Cliff Dwellers and Onwentsia Clubs. 



JOHN H. KRUSE. 



John H. Kruse is well known in connection with the undertaking business in 
Chicago, being located at No. 5143 South Ashland avenue. He was born in Ger- 
many, October 1, 1868, and is a son of Louis and Minnie Kruse, who came to 
Chicago in November, 1871, when their son John was a little lad of but three 
summers. The father engaged in the teaming business and continued his residence 
in Chicago until his death, which occurred in June, 1913. He is still survived by his 
widow. - 

John H. Kruse acquired a public school education and started out in the business 
world as clerk in a grocery store, being thus employed for six years by one man, a 
fact which indicates his faithfulness, capability and efficiency. He was afterward 
with the firm of Moody & Waters for eleven years, but, ambitious to engage in busi- 
ness on his own account, he turned his attention to undertaking in 1905, entering 
into partnership with his cousin, Louis M. Kruse, at 4943 South Ashland avenue. 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 227 

This cousin afterward went to South Dakota and Mr. Kruse purchased his interest 
in the business on the 1st of March, 1911. In August, 1913, occurred the death of 
A. Kroning, an undertaker doing business at No. 5143 South Ashland avenue. In 
March of the following year Mr. Kruse purchased the business of the widow and 
now occupies well equipped quarters, having a building with a frontage of twenty- 
five feet, with a chapel having a seating capacity of sixty. He is a member of the 
Chicago Undertakers Association and the Chicago ^lotor Liverymen's Association. 

On the 1st of September, 1901, Mr. Kruse was united in marriage to Miss 
Fredericke Buerkle, of Chicago, a daughter of Mrs. Catherine Buerkle. To them 
have been born two children, Alice M. and Raymond Charles, aged respectively 
fifteen and thirteen years. 

Mr. Kruse is a member of South Gate Lodge, No. 968, A. F. & A. M., and his 
wife is connected with Douglas Chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star. He also 
belongs to the Cosmopolitan Sick Benefit Society and both are members of the 
Reformed church, the teachings of which guide them in all of life's relations. In 
politics Mr. Kruse is a republican but has never been an aspirant for office, preferring 
to concentrate his efforts and attention upon his business affairs. He has lived in 
the home neighborhood for over forty-two years. When his father moved into the 
district there were no street cars or improvements and Mr. Kruse had to walk to 
Twenty-sixth street and Archer avenue to attend school. He has witnessed a 
marvelous growth and transformation in the section of the city in which he makes 
his home and has ever rejoiced in the progress that has been accomplished. He 
has a wide acquaintance in his ward and surrounding sections of the city and genuine 
worth on his part has gained for him the esteem and confidence of his fellowmen in 
high degree. 



JOHN C. KRIETENSTEIN. 

Prominent among those who are operating actively in the field of building in 
Chicago is the firm of Krietenstein Brothers, of which John C. Krietenstein is a 
representative. He was born April 6, 1872, in the city which is yet his home, his 
parents being Frederick and Dorothea (Krogman) Krietenstein. The father was a 
native of Lippe, Germany, and came to the United States in 1857. He took up the 
business of brick manufacturing, which he followed successfully until 1872, when 
he retired from active life, spending his remaining days in the enjoyment of well 
earned rest. He passed away in 1911, at the advanced age of eighty-seven years. 
His wife is a native of Mecklenburg, Germany, and they were married in Chicago, 
where Mrs. Krietenstein still makes her home at the age of eighty-eight years. In 
their family were six children, five of whom are yet living, namely: Frederick F. ; 
Minnie, the wife of Simon Stockmeyer; Louise, the wife of Daniel Baker; William 
S. ; and John C. 

The last named acquired his education in parochial and public schools of Chicago 
and also pursued a course in the Chicago Law School. He afterward engaged in 
mill work and in the lumber business, pertaining to buildings, until twentj'-five years 
ago, when he took up the task of speculative building, erecting apartments for sale 
and for rental. He thus developed considerable south side property. He has erected 



228 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

numerous apartment houses^ aggregating in all about one thousand flats. He still 
owns several of these buildings located in the better districts of the south side. His 
i^roperty holdings include the Vincennes Court on Vincennes avenue, extending from 
Forty-eighth place to Forty-ninth street. This is one of the finest and most modern 
apartment buildings in Chicago, containing sixty-six apartments of from three to 
six rooms each, and from his iDroperty holdings he derives a very substantial and 
gratifying annual rental. 

Mr. Krietenstein was married in Pasadena, California, on the 27th of December, 
1910, to Miss Ella M. Eseman, a daughter of Charles Eseman, of that place, and 
they have become parents of two daughters and a son, Dorothy, Elizabeth and John 
W. The family reside at No. 5139 Woodlawn avenue. Mr. Krietenstein is a member 
of the English Lutheran church, in which he has been very active, serving as its 
secretary and in other ofiicial connections. His political endorsement is given to 
the republican party. Along the line of his chosen life work he has become a member 
of the Carpenters & Builders Association, also of the Building Construction 
Employers Association and of the Chicago Real Estate Board. Watchful of all indi- 
cations pointing to success, he has made judicious investments and has wisely directed 
his interest and activities until success in substantial measure has crowned his labors 
and placed him with the foremost builders of the middle west. 



WILLIAM G. SCHARF. 



The multiplicity of business enterprises in Chicago and the variety of occupations 
here followed make it unnecessary for the native sons of the city to seek employ- 
ment elsewhere. Every avenue of business is open to them here, and although com- 
petition is great, merit wins its advancement, as is proven in the life records of 
thousands of Chicago's citizens. 

William G. Scharf was born in this city September 28, 1882, and is a son of 
George and Catherine (Rehling) Scharf. The mother is also a native of Chicago and 
a daughter of Henry Rehling, who was one of the pioneer residents of the city. He 
took up his abode in Grand Rapids, Michigan, in 1832 and removed to Chicago in 
1838, arriving the year after the city was incorporated. It contained then only a 
very small population and the most farsighted could not have dreamed of the changes 
which were to occur and make it the second city in the United States. Mr. Rehling 
established a dairy on the northwest side and developed a business of large propor- 
tions. Mr. Scharf came to Chicago about 1860 and was engaged in the wood carving 
business until his establishment was destroyed by the great fire of 1871. Later he 
removed to southern Illinois, establishing his home near Springfield, and entered 
the undertaking business at Braceville, Illinois, in 1875. While he was there located 
a mine was flooded and thirteen hundred men were drowned. Mr. Scharf was given 
charge of the Herculean task of taking care of and burying this entire number and 
it required two weeks before all of the bodies were exhumed. It also required all 
the caskets that could be obtained from Chicago. Mr. Scharf gained wide reputation 
by the able manner in which he did this work. In 1882 he removed to Chicago and 
established an undertaking business at No. 5010 Ashland avenue, being the first in 
that line of business in the section of the city in which he opened his store. He 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 229 

purchased property and afterward added fifty feet more^ making a total of seventy- 
five feet frontage. His business block is two stories in height. He conducted a 
large livery business as well as the undertaking business and continued active along 
those lines until 1910, when he retired to enjoy a rest which he had truly earned 
and richly deserved. He is a member of the Knights of Columbus and of the Catholic 
Order of Foresters and he holds membership in St. Augustine's Catholic church, 
being one of the most generous contributors to the building of its house of worship. 
In jDolitics he was an active republican but never held public office. At length he 
removed from Chicago and now makes his home in Crown Point, Indiana. To him 
and his wife were born five children: Sophia, who has departed this life; Joseph, 
who died at the age of thirty years, leaving a wife but no children, his death having 
occurred in 1898, his surviving widow being Mrs. Sarah Scharf; Lillian, the wife 
of Henry Bohlig, a resident of Crown Point, Indiana ; William G., of this review ; 
and Raymond, a building contractor on the north side of Chicago, who married Mary 
Richards. 

William G. Scharf is indebted to the parochial and public schools of Chicago for 
the educational opportunities which he enjoyed in youth and later he had the 
advantage of a course in a business college. Early he began assisting his father 
in undertaking and ultimately entered the business with his father after his school 
days were over. He has conducted the business since his father's retirement and is 
a worthy successor of George Scharf, who ranked as a leading undertaker of the 
city. Mr. Scharf belongs to the Chicago Undertakers Association and the Chicago 
Motor Liverymen's Association. 

In 1906 Mr. Scharf was united in marriage to Miss Ellen Margaret Druetzler, of 
Chicago, and their children are Ellen, Georgiana and Geraldine, but the second named 
has passed away. Mr. Scharf and his family are communicants of St. Augustine's 
Catholic church and he is identified with several fraternal organizations, including the 
Knights of Columbus, the Catholic Order of Foresters, the Catholic Knights of 
America, the Knights of The Maccabees and the United Order of Foresters. In 
politics he is a democrat and is a firm believer in the party but has never been an 
aspirant for public office. He is identified with the Southwest Business Men's 
Association and cooperates in all well defined plans and measures for the develop- 
ment of the interests of that section of the city. He stands loyally for the public 
welfare in everything and is now serving on the exemption board of Division No. 
67, which is the second largest in the United States, having over ten thousand 
registrants. 



HOMER E. TINSMAN. 



Homer E. Tinsman, a representative of the Chicago bar, was born in Romeo, 
Michigan, October 21, 1860, a son of William H. and Mary J. Tinsman. The 
father was born upon a farm near Romeo, August 21, 1837, representing one of 
the old families of that section of the country. He carried on general agricultural 
pursuits throughout his entire life and for a period also engaged in the conduct of 
a general mercantile store but retired from that field of business in 1892. Fifteen 
years passed and he then again entered upon active business life, in which he 



230 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

still continues^, for indolence and idleness are utterly foreign to his nature and he 
could not be content without some occupation. 

Homer E. Tinsman was a pupil in the public schools of Romeo, pursuing his 
course through consecutive grades until graduated from the high school in 1878. 
He spent a year thereafter at home and then resumed his education, becoming a 
pupil in the University of Michigan, from which he was graduated in 1883 with 
the Bachelor of Arts degree. In August of that year he came to Chicago and 
entered the law office of Grant & Brady as a student and clerk, continuing in that 
connection for three years. Admitted to the bar, he practiced law alone for a year 
and in 1887 became a partner in the firm of Burke, Hollett & Tinsman, this asso- 
ciation being maintained until 1893, when Mr. Burke was elected judge of the 
circuit court. The two remaining partners continued in practice under the firm 
style of Hollett & Tinsman until 1898, when they were joined by Mr. Sauter, and 
under the style of Hollett, Tinsman & Sauter they continued in practice until 1905. 
At that time Mr. Tinsman became the senior partner in the firm of Tinsman, Rankin 
& Neltnor. He is an able lawyer, well versed in the principles of jurisprudence, 
and his energy prompts him to the careful preparation of every case, while his pre- 
sentation of his cause is marked by logical reasoning and sound deduction. He filled 
the office of assistant county attorney from 1888 until 1890 but has not been a 
politician in the usually accepted sense of the term. In the spring of 1908, how- 
ever, he was elected alderman from the thirty-second ward but resigned on the 1st 
of March, 1909. 

Mr. Tinsman was married in Chicago to Miss Christina P. Dale on the 24th of 
October, 1894. Aside from the enjoyment which his home offers him in his leisure 
hours he spends some time in golf, holding membership in the Beverly Golf Club, 
and he also takes pleasure in walking and driving. He is also an amateur 
photographer and has done some creditable work with the kodak. His political 
allegiance is given to the republican party and his religious faith is that of the 
Episcopal church. He is well known in the membership of the Hamilton Club, is a 
member of the City Club of Chicago, and is identified with various fraternal 
organizations, holding membership in Englewood Lodge, No. 690, A. F. & A. M.; 
Englewood Chapter, No. 176, R. A. M. ; Englewood Commandery, No. 59, K. T.; 
Imperial Council, R. & S. M.; Oriental Consistory, S. P. R. S.; and Medinah Temple 
of the Mystic Shrine. He likewise holds membershijD with the Odd Fellows, the 
Royal League and the Modern Woodmen. He has a very ^vide acquaintance and 
his strongly marked and commendable characteristics have gained him wide popu- 
larity. 



JAMES A. METZ. 



Whatever success James A. ]Metz has achieved during the course of his business 
career is due entirely to his persistent effort, capable management and thoroughness 
in his work, for he started out in life empty-handed, being first employed as a steam- 
boat pilot. He was born at Apple River, Illinois, on the 23d of July, 1858, a son of 
John and Lucy (Carr) Metz. The father followed the occupation of mining and 
later turned his attention to farming, but both he and his wife have now passed away. 

James A. Metz acquired a public school education and started in business life as 




JAMES A. METZ 



I'ilE SEW VOHK 



ASTOi{, LE.\()X A.VO 
TILJJEN KOU.NU.-ITJOXS 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 233 

a steamboat jjilot on the Mississippi river. He secured his second papers but ran 
the boat into the bank and quit. Later he turned his attention to the nursery business, 
selling apple trees^ and subsequently he pursued a course of embalming in St. Louis 
under Renard. In June, 1880, he arrived in Chicago, where he entered the employ 
of George Rhodes on Milwaukee avenue, who was there conducting an undertaking 
and livery business and who was also a Board of Trade man. Mr. Metz afterward 
sjDent three years in the employ of Herman Seigman and later was with the firm of 
Wold & Wold for seven years. On the expiration of that period he started in business 
on his own account on Grand avenue in 1893. After remaining there for a brief 
period his wife died and he sold out his business, going upon the road as a traveling 
salesman. He was one of the first to take up the arterial method of embalming, 
doing his first work along that line in 1879. He prepared his own fluid, which he 
sold to other undertakers. In 1902 he located in Grand Crossing, where he entered 
the employ of the W. C. Vail Undertaking Company, Mr. Vail died in 1903 and Mr. 
Metz then established business on his own account at No. 1231 Seventy-fifth street, 
where he continued for three years. Later he purchased a two-story building at No. 
1020 East Seventy-fifth street, where he has since conducted business and with the 
passing years his patronage has steadily increased. 

In 1879 Mr. Metz was united in marriage to Miss Viola Bailey, of Hardin, 
Illinois, who passed away in 1894, leaving two children: Edith, the wife of Amos E. 
Watson, of Hardin, Illinois, by whom she has five children; and Gertrude, the wife 
of C. C. Campbell, who is editor of the Hardin Herald, and they have two children. 
Having lost his first wife, Mr. Metz was again married on the 22d of April, 1903, his 
second union being with Mattie Brenner, of Cissna Park, Illinois, a daughter of John 
and Elizabeth Brenner. Her father died in the year 1913, but her mother is still 
living at the age of seventy-eight years. Mrs. Metz actively assists her husband in 
the business, laying out women who have been called from this life, and her work is of 
great benefit to Mr. Metz in his business. 

Fraternally Mr. Metz is connected with Aaron Lodge, No. 913, A. F. & A. M., 
and with Grand Crossing Chapter, No. 219, R. A. M. His wife is a member of 
America Chapter No. 454, O. E. S. He likewise belongs to Amigo Lodge, No. 484, 
K. P., and Colfax Lodge, No. 198, I. O. O. F. ; and both are members of The Macca- 
bees, while Mr. Metz is also connected with the Columbian Knights. His political 
allegiance is given to the republican party, and while not an office seeker, he keeps 
well informed on the questions and issues of the day and is thus able to support his 
position by intelligent argument. He belongs to the Grand Crossing Business Men's 
Club and is identified with the movement which is bringing careful organization into 
the upbuilding of business interests and the development of trade relations. 



FRANK WALDO SMITH. 



There is perhaps no man in all Chicago who has done more to keep alive civic 
pride than Frank Waldo Smith, in business circles occupying the position of 
cashier of "the Corn Exchange National Bank since 1885 and enjoying throughout 
all the intervening years the high regard of his colleagues. He is more widely 
known in the city at large because of the active part which he has taken in pre- 

Vol. IV— 13 



234 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

serving records relative to Chicago's history and in disseminating among the younger 
generation a knowledge of past glories and events which have constituted the foun- 
dation upon which Chicago's present greatness and permanent prosperity rests. 

Although Mr. Smith has not yet passed the prime of life^ he is one of Chi- 
cago's pioneers and his memory forms a connecting link between the primitive 
past and the progressive present. He was born in this city. May 19, 1849, only 
twelve years after its incorporation. In fact, it was at that time only a town — 
a growing town to be sure — upon a western j^rairie and had comparatively little 
commercial or industrial importance. His parents were Mr. and Mrs. Waldo 
Wait Smith, who at the time of his birth resided at the northeast corner of Frank- 
lin and Madison streets. His mother in her maidenhood was Jane Elizabeth Fogg, 
a daughter of Ebenezer Fogg and was born at Cambridgeport, Massachusetts and 
came to Chicago in 1847. Mr. Waldo W. Smith came to Chicago from Pawlett, 
Vermont in 1836, settling here at the time when the city probably boasted of two 
brick buildings. The father's eldest brother, who had arrived in 1835, established 
the Union Ridge Hotel at the corner of Higgins street and Sixty-fourth avenue, 
and in all the years which have since been added to the cycle of the centuries 
the members of this family have taken active and helpful part in the work of gen- 
eral progress and municipal improvement. 

In the acquirement of his education Frank Waldo Smith attended successively 
the Mosely school, in 1857, the Haven school, in 1862, and the old Chicago high 
school, Monroe and Halsted streets in 1863. Four years later he entered the 
employ of his father, who was a wholesale grocer at 43 South Water street as a 
partner of the firm of Smith Brothers, successors of Smith, Pollard & Company. 
In the great fire of October, 1871, their business was destroyed with a total loss, 
and Mr. Smith therefore, turned his attention to other lines. Paralyzed for a 
brief moment by the awful calamity with which it had been visited, the city began 
its rebuilding with renewed activity, accepting its losses as an impetus for increased 
development and progress. Mr. Smith, on the 11th of April, 1872, secured a 
position as clearing house clerk in the employ of the Third National Bank, where 
he remained until the failure of that institution in 1875. For ten years there- 
after he was chief clerk with the Merchants Loan & Trust Company and on Octo- 
ber 31, 1885, was elected to the position of cashier of the Corn Exchange National 
Bank, with which he has thus been connected to tlie present time, covering a 
period of a quarter of a century. He is one of the oldest bank cashiers in j'ears 
of continued service in Chicago and his long incumbency in the position stands, 
in incontrovertible evidence of his ability and the high place which he occupies in 
the regard of his colleagues in banking circles. 

On the 9th of April, 1873, ^Nlr. Smith was married to Miss Dora A. Hadden 
and unto them have been born three children: Fannie B., Osborn F. and Ethel 
H., who reside with their parents at No. 5539 Cornell avenue with the exception 
of Osborn F. Smith, who is now married and lias established a home of liis own. 
Mr. Smith is a prominent and popular member of the Press Club and for two 
years was its treasurer. Those who know him have been better for his friend- 
ship. Loyalty is one of his marked characteristics and it is manifest in all of liis 
relations with his fellowmen. 

During the past ten years Mr. Smith has given much time to researcli concern- 
ing the early history of Chicago and has lectured to and entertained manv audiences 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 235 

with his illustrated scenes and stories of the early days. His devotion to local 
interests has been like the loyalty of a dutiful son to a father. He stands today 
among the honored band of pioneer settlers, but, unlike many of them, he has not 
only been associated with the city during its formative period but has continued 
an active factor in its later day progress and improvement. While an honored 
representative of the past, he is doing for the present generation that which keeps 
fresh and causes to be cherished the memory of the old Chicago which was builded 
upon a strong and broad foundation of lofty purpose. No citizen possesses more 
valuable records concerning the early days nor has a mind more greatly enriched 
by reminiscences of men and events of an earlier generation. His lectures have 
at times constituted the force that has called to life the memories of the earlier 
settlers, while the yoimger Chicago has listened spellbound to his stories of the 
early days. His efforts in this direction have been put forth all because of his 
devotion to the city which he loves so well, and both the older and younger genera- 
tion owe to him a debt of gratitude that can never be paid for what he has accom- 
plished in perpetuating not only for the present but for all future time the history 
of the Queen city by the lake. 



DANIEL F. CURLEY. 



The undertaking firm of D. F. Curley's Sons is well known. It was established 
in November, 1916, taking over the business formerly conducted imder the name 
of D. F. Curley & Son. The business had been organized under that firm style 
on the 1st of January, 1916, and was successor to D. F. Curley, who had become 
proprietor of the undertaking establishment that had been opened by the firm of 
Mullin & Curley in September, 1897. In 1901, Mr. Curley had purchased the 
interest of his partner, ]\Ir. Mullin, and continued the business alone until he 
admitted his son to a partnershijj. His first location was at No. 4503 Wentworth 
avenue and later a removal was made to 1523 Wentworth avenue, where the business 
was carried on until 1909, when he secured new quarters at No. 4517 Wentworth 
avenue. There he erected a new building, twenty-five by one hundred and twenty- 
five feet and two stories in height. The family resides above the store. The under- 
taking establishment is splendidly equipped and the chapel has a seating capacity 
of fifty. 

Daniel F. Curley, who for many years carried on the business, was born in 
Boston, Massachusetts, on the 1st of January, 1860, and was a son of Patrick and 
Mary Curley. The father died in Boston and the mother afterward came to 
Chicago in 1866, bringing with her her family. Daniel F. Curley of this review 
was at that time only six years of age, so that he was reared in Chicago and in 
Wisconsin. For a time he was connected with the firm of Reid, Murdoch & Fisher 
and afterward was associated with the Armour interests. At a later period he 
filled the office of bailiff and subsequently occupied the position of United States 
ganger. Higher and more prominent political offices were given him, for he was 
chosen to represent his district in the state legislature, in which he served for two 
years and was then elected to the state senate, of which he was a member for four 



236 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

years. He next entered the undertaking business, in which he continued to the time 
of his death on the 1st of November^ 1916. 

Daniel F. Curley Was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Dunn, a daughter of 
Daniel and Margaret Dunn. The father was one of the pioneer residents of Chicago 
and engaged in horseshoeing here at an early day, but his j^lace of business was 
destroyed by fire during the great conflagration which swept over the city in 
October, 1871. To Mr. and Mrs. Curley were born the following named. Daniel 
F., the eldest son, was graduated from the public schools and a business college and 
also from Worsham's School of Embalming. From 1905 until 1912 he was in old 
Mexico, where he was engaged in the mining business, and then he returned to 
Chicago and entered the undertaking business with his father in July, 1912. On 
the 12th of September, 1916, he married Josephine Duffy, of Chicago, and they 
have one child, Daniel (III). Daniel F. Curley (II,) is a member of the Knights 
of Columbus and also of the Knights and Ladies of Security and has membership 
relations as well with the Catholic Men's Benevolent Association and the Loyal 
Order of Moose. Mary Curley, the second member of the family, is the wife of 
Raymond Mahoney, of Chicago, and they have two children. Catherine, the third 
of the family, is deceased. Peter J. is a newsj^aper man. Edward J. is a graduate 
of St.- Cecelia's and St. Viateur's College of Bourbonnais, Illinois. He is likewise a 
graduate of Worsham's School of Embalming and entered business with his father in 
May, 1913. He is a member of the Knights of Columbus and the Catholic Order of 
Foresters. Margaret, the next of the family, is at home. Nellie is deceased. Anna and 
Frances, the two youngest children, are attending high school. The sons of the family 
maintain an independent course in politics. They are well known and substantial 
business men of the city, conducting their interests along lines that neither seek nor 
require disguise. They are straightforward, active and energetic and their success is 
the merited reward of persistent and earnest labor. They attend St. Cecelia's 
Catholic church and are identified with various church societies. 



GUSTAF H. CARLSON, 



Gustaf H. Carlson is perhaps the most prominent survej'or in America of 
Swedish descent and such is his standing in his profession that he has been retained 
for expert work in many important connections, his word coming to be widely 
accepted as authority. He was born in Malmo, Sweden, April 16, 1848, and at 
the age of twelve years went to Germany, pursuing his education in the schools 
of Schleswig until graduated from the technical institute at Christianfeld. In 
1869 he returned to Sweden and the following j^ear sailed for America, making his 
wa}' first to Kansas, where he remained until 1873. 

In that year he came to Chicago and his name has since been closely associated 
with the most important surveys made in this city and vicinity. From 1874 until 
1877 he was engaged as village engineer of Hyde Park, surveying the village and 
compiling an official atlas for said village. The thoroughness and exactness of his 
work in this connection brought him at once into such prominence that the follow- 
ing year the democratic nomination was tendered him unsolicited. Later Mr. Carlson 
compiled atlases of the city of Chicago, the city of Lake View and the town of Lake. 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 237 

He had previously formed a partnership with Samuel S. Greely for the publica- 
tion of these atlases under the firm name of Greely, Carlson & Company, which 
in 1887 was incorporated under the name of the Greely-Carlson Company. For 
ten years afterward Mr. Carlson continued as manager of the company and all 
of the work, including the planning of town sites, subdivisions and cemeteries, was 
thus under his personal supervision. These atlases are regarded as authority and 
are used by the various departments of the city government and in the offices of 
attorneys and real-estate firms. The towns of Hegewisch, Pullman, Normal Park, 
Auburn Park, Chicago Heights and Edgewater are among those laid out by Mr. 
Carlson. He is frequently consulted as an eminent authority in cases of disputed 
boundaries in the city of Chicago and also in this state and in other states when 
a high degree of accuracy is required. 

In 1898 Mr. Carlson sold his interest in the Greely-Carlson Company and opened 
an independent office at what is now No. 25 North Dearborn street, where he is 
still located. Among other important surveys made for the city of Chicago Mr. 
Carlson undertook on the 10th of January, 1903, a survey from Madison street to 
Van Buren street for the depot grounds of the Pennsylvania Railroad. This survey 
was made with the ultimate purpose of widening the Chicago river, the survey being 
to determine the accuracy of previous surveys and the right to some of the property 
held by the Pennsylvania Railroad which contested the right of the city for endeavor- 
ing to encroach on what they termed was their rightful property. The sanitary 
board employed Mr. Matheson, who originally laid out the Illinois and Michigan 
canal and whose authority on such questions had previously never been questioned. 
Mr. Matheson's survey showed that the railroad company's property encroached 
on the Chicago river and on the strength of this survey they brought a suit of eject- 
ment against the railroad company. Mr. Carlson's expert testimony was called 
into the case of the people of the state of Illinois against the Illinois Steel Com- 
pany in regard to the property occupied by the south works of the Illinois Steel 
Company along the shore of Lake ]\Iichigan at South Chicago, that in pursuance 
of such employment he made such survey and examined the records of the United 
States engineering department, showing the location of the lake shore in that 
vicinity from time to time, and that from such survey and examination of such 
records he found that land had been made along the shore line from Seventy-ninth 
street to Calumet river to the extent of one hundred and eighty-seven and a fraction 
acres. Furthermore as the result of his survey it was ascertained that other land, 
together with the extent of two hundred and thirty-four and thirty-five hundredths 
acres was reclaimed by the Illinois Steel Company and that this was worth twenty- 
three thousand, four hundred and thirty-five dollars. 

On the 8th of November, 1878, Mr. Carlson was married to Miss Julie Vodoz, 
of Vevey, Switzerland, and unto them have been born a son and a daughter, Gustaf 
and Julie Vodoz, named respectively for the father and mother. The son who is 
in business with his father is thoroughly proficient in that line and is now general 
office manager. 

In religious faith Mr. Carlson is a Christian Scientist and in politics is a demo- 
crat of the old school but is not so bound by party ties that he does not feel that he 
can vote independently. In fact, he did cast a presidential ballot for William 
McKinley. He is an associate member of the Chicago Real Estate Board but is not 
prominent as a club man. He makes his home at Glen Ellvn and is interested in the 



238 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

progress and welfare of that attractive suburb. Thorough technical training quali- 
fied him for the work to which he has devoted his life and in which he has made con- 
tinuous progress until he stands as one of the foremost surveyors of the country. 



JOHX W. RIDDLE. 



John W. Biddle, engaged in the undertaking business, is also well known in 
Masonic circles and throughout his entire life has been a loyal follower of the craft. 
He was born in England, May 17, 1872, a son of John and Julia (Cooper) Riddle, 
who on coming to the United States in 1880 made their way westward to Illinois, 
settling in Joliet, where they remained until 1886 and then came to Chicago. The 
father was engaged in the steel business and is now living retired, making his home in 
Pontiac, Illinois. 

John W. Riddle acquired a public school education and afterward entered into 
the coal trade, eventually engaging in the wholesale coal business on his own account 
in Chicago. His identification with the undertaking business dates from 1905, at 
which time he opened undertaking j^arlors at No. 1754 West Thirty-fifth street. In 
1909 a new building was erected expressly for him at No. 1750 West Thirty-fifth 
street. It is twenty-five by sixty-five feet and two stories in height. There is a 
large show room and chapel which will seat one hundred people. In 1914 Mr. Riddle 
bought out the business of T. H. Schwier at No. 1449 East Sixty-third street and 
which had been established about 1893. Mr. Riddle fitted up a new place there wuth 
a fine show room and chapel that also has a seating capacity for one hundred and 
he is now conducting both establishments. He owns an auto hearse and three 
limousine cars of the Pierce- Arrow make. In 1918 he purchased a new Pierce- Arrow 
hearse. He had used his first one for ten years, during which time it had covered 
three hundred thousand miles. Mr. Riddle is a well known and prominent member 
of the Chicago Undertakers Association, of which he has served as treasurer, and 
he also served on the executive committee for several years. He is likewise a member 
of the Chicago Motor Liverymen's Association. 

On the 18th of August, 1892, ]Mr. Riddle was united in marriage to Miss ^Margaret 
Jones, of Irondale, Ohio, and to them have been born four children: Arthur, twenty- 
four years of age, who was graduated from the Chicago high school and attended 
Armour Institute and the Lewis Institute, pursuing a mechanical engineering course, 
since which time he has engaged in the railway supply business; Margaret, at home; 
Melville, who was associated with his father in business and is now in the One 
Hundred and Thirtj^-first Infantry, U. S. A., at Houston, Texas; and Edith, who is 
a high school pupil. 

As previously stated, Mr. Riddle is well known in Masonic circles. He has 
membership in Dearborn Lodge, No. 310, A. F. & A. M.; Chicago Chapter, No. 127, 
R. A. M.; Palestine Council, No. 66, R. & S. !M. ; Chevalier Rayard Commandery, 
No. 52, K. T.; and Frances Willard Chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star. He 
is likewise connected with McKinley Park Lodge, No. 319, I. O. O. F., and in the 
present year, 1918, he is serving as master of the Masonic lodge. He is also 
connected with Rrighton Tent of the Modern Woodmen of America and with Emery 
A. Storrs Council of the Royal Arcanum, of which he is serving as regent. He belongs 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 239 

to Amity Council, No. 13, of the Royal League, and to Freedom Lodge, No. 14, 
L. O. L. He is likewise a member of the Woodlawn Business Men's Association 
and of Wentworth Lodge of the Columbian Circle. He attends the Methodist church 
and he gives his jjolitical allegiance to the republican party, being an active' worker 
in its ranks. He is interested in all that has to do with general progress and improve- 
ment, not only in the section of the city in which he resides, but throughout Chicago 
as well, and his aid and supjjort are always found on the side of advancement and 
upbuilding. 



E. H. LADISH. 



E. H. Ladish, known in business circles of Chicago as a capable and progressive 
druggist and also identified with industrial activity as vice president of the Ladish 
Drop Forge Company, operating at Cudahy, Wisconsin, was born in the city of Mil- 
waukee on the 31st of March, 1873, a son of Herman C. and Augusta Ladish, both 
of whom became residents of jNIilwaukee when quite young. The father engaged 
in the lumber business throughout his entire life. 

The son pursued his education in parochial and public schools of his native city 
and entered upon an ,ap2Drenticeship to the drug business in the employ of W. A. 
Kropp on Sixth avenue and Greenfield street in Milwaukee. There he remained for 
two years, after which he became connected with the firm of Blankenhorn & Com- 
pany. He was next assistant to William T. Lochemes and in August, 1893, he left 
his native city to become a resident of Chicago, since which time he has been closely 
identified with commercial interests here. He became a registered pharmacist in 
November, 1893, and for a time engaged in clerking for Charles H. Spiehr. Later he 
entered the employ of Otto J. Hartwig and in April, 189i, became connected with 
Herman Fry, with whom he remained until November, 1899. He then purchased the 
store of which he had formerly been manager and conducted it until the 20th of 
September, 1910, when he sold the business. He also purchased a store at No. 122 
Seminary avenue, of which he became proprietor about 1904, and this he conducted 
until 1907, when he sold out to J. A. Topf, who had been acting as his manager. In 
September, 1910, Mr. Ladish became the president and manager of the Chicago 
Chocolate Company, having a candy factory at No. 3233 West Lake street. They 
engaged in the general manufacture of candies and Mr. Ladish continued active in 
the business until February, 1912, when the business was closed out. On the 11th 
of March of the same year Mr. Ladish became manager of a drug store for George 
Fry at No. 172 West North avenue and in November, 1913, purchased the store, which 
he has since successfully conducted, making it one of the leading drug establishments 
in that section of the city. He is also the vice president of the Ladish Drop Forge 
Company, which operates the most modern and best equipped establishment of the 
kind in the middle west. It is located at Cudahy, Wisconsin, with main office at 
Milwaukee, and its employes number more than two hundred, while its output is 
shipped to various sections of the country. Mr. Ladish is a member of the Chicago 
Drug Club and of the Chicago Retail Druggists Association, in which he served for 
many years as a member of the executive committee. He also belongs to the National 
Association of Detail Druggists and was on the executive board for two years. He is 



240 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

likewise connected with the American Pharmaceutical Association and was formerly 
secretary of its section on commercial interests and past secretary of the section on 
practical pharmacy and dispensing. He was one of the original members of the non- 
official standards committee. He has served as chairman of the committee of trade 
interests of the Illinois Pharmaceutical Association and in 1916 he was elected a 
member of the Veteran Druggists Association. He is thus well known to the trade 
and enjoys the highest respect, goodwill and confidence of his colleagues and con- 
temporaries. 

Fraternally Mr. Ladish is well known in ISIasonic circles, belonging to Cleveland 
Lodge, No. 211, A. F. & A. M.; Lincoln Park Chapter, No. 177, R. A. M.; Chicago 
Council, No. 4, R. & S. M.; Chicago Commandery, No. 19, K. T.; and Medinah 
Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S. In the year 1906 he served as master of his lodge. 
He is likewise a member of. the National Union, of the Independent Order of 
Foresters and is a past president of the Columbian Circle, having been its chief 
executive officer in 1901. His political endorsement has ever been given to the 
republican party, in the work and success of which he is greatly interested, and he is 
well known as a speaker in ward politics. 'Mr. Ladish deserves much credit for 
what he has accomplished in life and has truly won the proud American title of a 
self-made man, for he started out to provide for his own supjDort when a lad of thirteen 
years and has since depended entirely upon his own efforts and resources. He has 
never allowed obstacles or difficulties to bar his path but has otercome these by per- 
sistent purpose and step by step has advanced in his business career, each forward 
step bringing him a broader outlook and wider opportunities which he has eagerly 
utilized. His record is indeed commendable and should inspire and encourage others, 
showing what may be accomplished through persistent individual effort. 



ALBERT G. CHURAN. 



It is seldom that early boyhood gives indication of the trend of man's activity. 
In the period of youth most boys feel that they will enter upon a life work that 
demands physical strength, which sums up their idea of courage and capacity. In 
his youthful days, however, Albert G. Churan manifested an interest in burial services 
and frequently was found burying insects and animals. As he advanced in years 
his interest in the business developed and since making his initial step in the business 
world he has been identified with the undertaker's profession. He was born in 
Chicago, October 15, 1883, a son of Albert and Sophia (Churan) Churan. The 
father was a son of Peter Churan, one of the pioneer residents of Chicago, and thus 
four generations of the family have been represented in this city. The father, 
Albert Churan, was a baker and long continued in business of that character. He 
died in 1912 but is still survived by his widow. 

Reared under the parental roof, Albert G. Churan pursued a public school edu- 
cation and was graduated from the Lakeview high school. At the age of twenty-one 
years he began work for Fred Westfall, an undertaker, with whom he remained lantil 
the death of his employer in 1912. Mr. Churan then established business on his 
own account at No. 2712 North Lincoln avenue, where he occupies a building Avith 
a frontage of twenty-five feet and where he has a well equipped undertaking 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 241 

establishment, carrying an extensive and carefully selected line of undertakers' 
merchandise and supplies. He has a chapel seating one hundred people and he has 
his own auto equipment for the conduct of funerals. Since starting in business he 
has been a member of the Undertakers Association and he is in thorough sympathy 
with its purpose to maintain the business at the highest possible standard. 

Mr. Churan is well known in fraternal connections, holding membership with 
Integrity Lodge, No. 997, A. F. & A. M. ; the Knights of Pythias ; the Columbian 
Knights ; the Fraternal Aid Union ; the Knights of The Maccabees and several other 
fraternal and insurance organizations, numbering twenty-two in all. He is likewise 
a member of the Bethlehem Lutheran church and its teachings guide him in all of his 
life's relations. In politics he has maintained an independent course, voting accord- 
ing to the dictates of his judgment without regard to party ties. That his has been 
a well spent and useful life is indicated in the fact that many of his stanchest friends 
are those who have known him from his boyhood to the present time. 



HENRY DIBBLEE. 



Henry Dibblee to the time of his death was numbered among those resourceful 
men whose activity has constituted the substantial and enduring qualities that have 
given Chicago her commercial greatness. He figured prominently in real-estate 
circles for many years as the senior partner of the firm of Dibblee & Manierre 
and also had voice in the management and control of important corporate interests 
of the city. Here he resided from 1872 until his demise on the 19th of December, 
1907. He was born in New York city, August 20, 1840, a son of E. R. and 
Frances M. (Hayes) Dibblee. His father was recognized as one of the leading 
importers of dry goods in the metropolis until his later years, when he retired from 
business. 

Henry Dibblee was a pupil in private and boarding schools of the eastern 
metropolis until eighteen years of age, when he entered his father's establishment 
as a clerk and bent his energy toward the mastery of the various phases of the 
business until his knowledge, experience and ability had qualified him to take up 
the responsibilities of a partnership and he was admitted to the firm, so contin- 
uing until 1872. Thinking that the growing western city of Chicago offered still 
broader opportunities, Mr. Dibblee came to Illinois and in January, 1873, joined 
William R. and John S. Gould in the foundry and iron business, which was con- 
ducted under the firm style of Gould & Dibblee until 1878. After the dissolution 
of the partnership Mr. Dibblee continued in the field as a dealer in ornamental 
iron work and afterward extended the scope of his trade by handling mantels and 
tiles, becoming an importer of many of the finest English encaustic tiles and also 
western agent for the leading American manufacturers. For eight years he con- 
ducted an extensive and growing business in those lines and then retired from 
the commercial field in 1886 to enter real-estate circles as a partner of George 
Manierre, operating under the firm style of Dibblee & Manierre up to the time 
of his demise. They soon became recognized as one of the leading real-estate 
firms in the city, negotiating many important transfers and managing deals which 
have left their impress upon the real-estate history of the city. Embracing favor- 



242 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

able opportunity for the extension of his interests in other lines, Mr. Dibblee became 
I^resident of the Chicago Auditorium Association and an influential director of the 
Calumet and Chicago Canal & Dock Company. The leading business men of the 
city regarded his judgment as sound, his enterprise unfaltering and his business 
integrity unassailable. 

On the 26th of November, 1873, Mr. Dibblee was married to Miss Laura Field, 
a daughter of John Field, of Conway, Massachusetts, a sister of Marshall Field and 
a representative of a family whose ancestral connection with the old Bay state 
dates back to 1650. Mr. and Mrs. Dibblee became the parents of two daughters. 
Bertha and Frances F. The former is the wife of John O. King and the latter 
is the wife of A. A. Spragiie, 2d. TJie children of this marriage are A. A. Sprague, 
3d, and Laura Sprague. 

The death of Mr. Dibblee occurred December 19, 1907, and took from Chi- 
cago one of her prominent men and citizens. He attended the Episcopal church and 
gave his political support to the democracy. He held membership in the Saddle 
and Cycle and Mid-Day Clubs and was honored with the presidency of the latter. 
He greatly enjoyed social life and outdoor sports, anything in the line of athletics 
making strong appeal to him. He was also a lover of art, music and travel but 
more than all liis interest centered- in his home, where his friends foimd him a 
social, genial host whose cordiality was unfeigned, while his family knew him as 
a devoted, considerate and loving husband and father. It is these personal traits 
of character, even more than business success, that serve to keep alive the memory 
of a man among his fellowmen, and such were Mr. Dibblee's excellencies of char- 
acter that many years will pass ere his memory will cease to be a cherished posses- 
sion to those who knew him. 



THOMAS P. KERRIGAN. 

Thomas P. Kerrigan devoted his time and energies to the undertaking business 
in Chicago for a number of years but death claimed him on the 26th of January, 1917, 
and in his passing he left behind him many warm friends who esteemed him most 
highly. He was born in Chicago, November 25, 1865, and was a son of Patrick and 
Catherine (^IcKague) Kerrigan, who in the '50s removed from BrookHne, Massa- 
chusetts, to tlie middle west, becoming residents of Chicago. 

Their son, Thomas P. Kerrigan, acquired a parochial school education and was 
graduated from St. Ignatius College. After his textbooks were put aside he became 
connected with the Chicago postoflice and occupied a position there for twenty-three 
years. He was advanced to the position of superintendent of Station U at Canal and 
Adams streets, but eventually he left the postoffice service, in which he had continued 
so long and faithfully, and in 1905 entered the undertaking business at No. 5512 
Ashland avenue, occupying a building twenty-five by seventy-five feet and containing 
a cliapel with a seating capacity for fifty. 

On the 15th of October, 1890, Mr. Kerrigan was imited in marriage to Miss 
Lucy L. Phelan, a daughter of Patrick and Elizabeth (Devine) Phelan, who came 
to Chicago in the '50s, when the city bore little resemblance to the metropolitan center 
that it is today. To Mr. and Mrs. Kerrigan were born nine children: Marybelle, 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 243 

who is the wife of I. Gilshey, of Montana, by whom she has one child, Leo; Joseph 
C, who is a graduate of the Worsham School of Embalming and who was his father's 
assistant in business and is now carrying on the business since his father's death ; 
Catherine, a kindergarten teacher ; Lucy, who is an elementary school teacher ; 
Walter, who is in business with his mother; Vincent, Elizabeth and Clement, all at 
home; and Thomas, who was the third in order of birth and has departed this life. 

The family are communicants of St. Basil's church, to which Mr. Kerrigan 
belonged, being a loyal communicant of that faith. He held membership in several 
church societies and belonged to the Knights of Columbus and the Catholic Order 
of Foresters. He was also a member of the Royal Arcanum and his political 
allegiance was given to the democratic party, of which he was a stanch adherent- 
He always stood loyally for what he believed to be for the best interests of the 
community and his cooperation could be counted upon to promote measures for the 
general good. 



GEORGE PECK MERRICK. 

As man leaves the elemental and approaches a higher civilization, using in mul- 
tiple forms the varied natural resources of the country, and from the results achieved 
therein evolves still more intricate interests wherein the rights and privileges of 
an increasing number of individuals are involved, the complexities of the law have 
become greater and legal problems more difficult of solution. Gradually, therefore, 
law has resolved itself into departments and specialization in the field of practice 
is therefore the outcome. George Peck Merrick, choosing the profession of the 
law as a life work, has concentrated his efforts more and more largely upon corpora- 
tion law and is today recognized as the legal representative of many important inter- 
ests of this character in Chicago. iNIoreover his entire life has been actuated by the 
spirit of undaunted enterprise which has ever dominated the middle west. 

A native son of Illinois, he was born October 4, 1862, of the marriage of Dr. 
George C. and Mary (Peck) ^lerrick. His more specifically literarj' education 
was acquired in the Northwestern University, from which he was graduated in 
ISS-i. His early professional reading was done under the direction of Judge Hanecy 
and in May, 1886, he passed the required examination which admitted him to prac- 
tice in the Illinois courts. Early in his career he became identified with corporation 
law, being made assistant attorney for the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad 
Company with headquarters in Chicago. He was thus identified with the rail- 
road until 1889, when he became a partner of his former preceptor, Judge Hanecy. 
This relation was maintained until the election of Mr. Hanecy to the circuit bench 
in 1893, after which INIr. Merrick continued alone in practice until he beame senior 
partner of the firm of Merrick, Evatis & Whitney. 

While advancement at the bar is proverbially slow, Mr. Merrick early displayed 
the possession of those qualities whereby he has gradually won his way to a fore- 
most jDosition in the field of corporation law. Many important cases have tested 
liis metal and have found him qualified for the demands made upon him. He was 
one of the leading practitioners in the lake shore litigation, in which he secured 
the decision of the supreme court establishing the 'lake shore as a park. The field 



244 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

of his activity^ howeverj is not confined to his work as an advocate and counselor, 
but reaches out Into public affairs, particularly in connection with Evanston, where 
he maintains his home. He has served as alderman and as civil service commis- 
sioner there and in the discussion of questions of moment his opinions have been 
an influencing and beneficial factor. 

In 1885 Mr. ^Merrick was married to Miss Grace Thompson, of Galesburg, 
Illinois, and unto them have been born two sons and a daughter, Clinton, Grace 
W. and Thompson. The family are prominent in the social circles of Evanston 
and Mr. Merrick belongs to the Evanston, Glen View, Chicago and University 
Clubs, and to the Sigma Chi fraternity. He has been president of the Evanston 
board of education, is a trustee of the Northwestern University and has been hon- 
ored with the presidency of its alumni association. Interested in all manly outdoor 
sports and athletics, his training permits that well developed physical manhood 
which must constitute the basis of all strong intellectual effort. No matter how 
varied or extensive his interests, however, his attention is chiefly centered upon 
the law and his devotion to his clients' interests is proverbial. He has close fra- 
ternal and professional association with the members of the city bar through his 
identification with the Chicago Law Club, the. Chicago Law Institute and the Chicago 
Bar Association, and still wider interests as a member of the Illinois Bar Association 
and the American Bar Association. 



WILLIAM DEUBEL. 



William Deubel was born in Germany on the 20th of March, 1855, but from the 
age of twenty-five years has been a resident of the United States. His parents were 
Daniel and Eva Marie (Voelker) Deubel, who spent their entire lives in Germany. 
William Deubel was there reared and educated and at length, thinking to find better 
business opportunities on this side of the Atlantic, he severed home ties and crossed 
the briny deep to the new world in 1 880. He made his way first to Pittsburgh, where 
he resided until 1883 and then again started upon a westward journey with Chicago 
as his destination. In early life he had learned the butcher's trade and followed it for 
a long period. After reaching Chicago he entered the employ of Swift & Company, 
with whom he remained for nineteen years — a fact which stands in incontrovertible 
evidence of his ability and fidelity and trustworthiness. At length, however, he 
determined to engage in business on his own account that his efforts might more 
directly benefit himself, and in 1903 he entered the undertaking business at No. 
5119 South Ashland avenue, where he rented a two-story building with twenty-five 
feet frontage. There he has since remained and in the intervening years he has 
built up a business of large proportions, being accorded a liberal patronage which 
he well deserves. He belongs to the Chicago Undertakers Association and also to 
the Chicago Motor Liverymen's Association and is interested in all that has to do 
with the progress of the profession and its thorough efficiency. 

In September, 1878, ]\Ir. Deubel was united in marriage to Miss Ottilie Hose, 
a native of Germany, and to them were born twelve children but six of the number 
died in infancy. Those who are living are: Hedwig, the wife of George Grimm, a 
resident of Chicago, by whom she has four children; William, who is a butcher with 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 245 

the Chicago Packing Company and is married and has four children; Elsie, the 
wife of Otto Landeck, of Chicago, by whom she has two children ; Ben, who is with 
the Yellow Cab Company of Chicago and is married and has one son; Clara, the wife 
of William Mackoitch, of Chicago; and Fritz, who is employed by the Western Elec- 
tric ComjJany of this city. The religious faith of the family is that of the Lutheran 
church, while in politics Mr. Deubel maintains an independent course, considering 
the capability of the candidates for office rather than their part}^ ties. He has never 
had occasion to regret his determination to come to the new world, for here he has 
found the opportunities which he sought and in their utilization has worked his way 
steadily upward. 



JOY MORTON. 



Joy Morton, for over thirty years one of Chicago's busiest men of affairs, was 
born at Detroit, Michigan, September 27, 1855. He is a son of Hon. J. Sterling 
Morton, who was secretary of agriculture during President Cleveland's second 
administration and who had the distinction of being the originator of Arbor Day. 
His mother, Caroline (Joy) Morton, departed this life in 1881. The early repre- 
sentatives of the Morton family came to the United States in the year 1620 from 
England and settled in Plymouth, Massachusetts, and were subsequently prominent 
in the early struggle for American independence. The maternal side (Thomas Joy) 
came also from England, settling in Boston in 1632. He was a contractor and 
built the first town house of Boston in 1650. 

The family of Morton moved to Nebraska in 1851, where Joy Morton spent his 
youth on the frontier, together with his brothers, Paul and Mark, freighting and 
roughing it on the plains. It was at a little Episcopal boarding school called Talbot 
Hall, located near Nebraska City, that their primary education was attained. At 
the age of fifteen, Joy ISIorton entered the employ of the Merchants National Bank 
at Nebraska City, where he remained for six years, passing through the various 
grades to the position of teller and ultimately acquiring an interest in the institution, 
of which he is still a director. 

His railroad experience was with the Burlington & Missouri River Railroad as 
a clerk in the treasurer's office at Omaha. After two years' service he was trans- 
ferred to Aurora, Illinois, as supply agent of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy 
Railroad, which position he retained but a short while, having determined to engage 
in the salt business in Chicago, as a member of the firm of E. I. Wheeler & Com- 
pany. In 1885 control of the business was secured and together with Mark Morton, 
the style of the firm was changed to Joy Morton & Company, agents for The Michi- 
gan Salt Association and some years later also for the Retsof Salt Mining Company 
of New York. For over twenty-five years this business has progressed and today 
the Morton Salt Company is the largest salt merchant and manufacturing concern 
in the United States. 

Besides his salt interests Mr. Morton is actively and officially identified witli 
many other important industrial, financial and commercial enterprises, in all of 
which he has been successful and a factor in their upbuilding. He is president and 
a director in The Great Western Cereal Comjoany ; president and a director in The 



246 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

Morton-Gregson Company (pork packers) ; director in The Western Cold Storage 
Com2Jany; director in the American Hominy Company; president and director of 
The Hutchinson-Kansas Salt Company; director in The Equitable Life Assurance 
Society of New York ; director in the Chicago & Alton Railroad ; director in The 
Continental & Commercial National Bank (the largest in Chicago) ; president and 
director of the Standard Office Company; owner of the Railway Exchange building; 
vice president and director of the Railway Exchange Bank. 

Mr. Morton is a member of the Chicago Historical Society, the Commercial, 
Chicago and Caxton Clubs of Chicago, and the Lawyers Club of New York city. 
He was married in 1880 to Miss Carie Lake, a daughter of Hon. George Lake, of 
Omaha, chief justice of the supreme court of Nebraska, and to them two children 
have been born, Jean Morton in 1883 and Sterling Morton in 1885. The latter is 
now connected with the Morton Salt Company and is secretary of the corporation. 



GEORGE A. V. HICKEY. 

There was no more popular resident of his section of the city than George A. V. 
Hickey, of Archer avenue, who numbered his friends from all classes, rich and poor, 
humble and great. A native of Wisconsin, he was born in the city of Madison on 
the 8th of June, 1858, and was a son of John and Ann Hickey. The mother died 
during the early boyhood of her son and the father afterward removed with his 
family to Chicago in the year 1865. George A. V. Hickey acquired a {public school 
education and after his textbooks were put aside entered the employ of M. W. Bon- 
field, his brother-in-law, thus receiving his initial business training. In 1890 he 
established a livery business on his own account at No. 2911 Archer avenue and in 
1891 he broadened the scope of his activities to include the undertaking business. 
About 1903 he purchased the projDerty which he occupied, and the livery business is 
still being continued. He was one of the first members of the Chicago Undertakers 
Association and also of the Chicago Motor Liverymen's Association. In the conduct 
of his business he built up a patronage that was extensive and well merited, for 
he was straightforward and reliable in all of his dealings and he put forth the most 
earnest and effective effort to conduct funerals in a manner that would be thoroughly 
satisfactory to the bereaved. He possessed kindliness, tact and uniform courtesy and 
his helpfulness Avon the gratitude of many who employed him. His wife also assisted 
him in the business for many years^ designing all of the caskets and doing all of 
the buying. 

It was on the 10th of June, 1877, that Mr. Hickey was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary N. Cannon, of Chicago, a daughter of Thomas A. and Bridget Cannon, who 
were early settlers of the city. Their children are: William F., who is assisting in 
the conduct of the business left bv his father and who is married and has two children ; 
George E., who is now conducting the business for their mother and who is married 
and has two children; and James J., who is engaged in the undertaking business at 
No. 1610 West ThirtA^-fifth street and has a wdfe and three sons. 

The death of Mr. Hickey occurred March 11, 1916, and was very sudden, his 
illness lasting but twenty-four hours. The esteem in which he was held is indicated 
by the fact that he had one of the largest funerals ever held on Archer avenue. The 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 247 

solemn requiem high mass was celebrated by his pastor, the Rev. M. O'Sullivan, 
assisted by the Rev. James Grace and Rev. Thomas Hogan, Many other priests of- 
ficiated and his remains were followed to the place of interment by one hundred and 
twenty auto cars and six priests at Calvary cemetery assisted in the last solemn rites. 
Mr. Hickey was a member of the Catholic Order of Foresters, the Ancient Order of 
Hibernians, the Knights of The Maccabees, the Columbian Knights, the Knights and 
Ladies of Security and of other societies. He was a communicant of St. Bridget's 
Catholic church and his political support was given to the democratic party, which 
found in him a stalwart champion. He was ever a generous supporter of the church 
and the work of the parish and he stood at all times for civic improvement and 
progress. He was very benevolent and charitable and was continualh^ extending a 
helping hand where aid was needed. Although never in Ireland, he was also a 
generous contributor to every movement for the relief of that country. In a word 
he stood stanchly on the side of righteousness, progress and improvement and for 
every activity that tended to ameliorate the hard conditions of life for the unfor- 
tunate. 



ANDREW SCHERER. 



Andrew Scherer, whose high professional standing is indicated in the fact that 
he has been honored with the vice presidency of the Illinois Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation, has been identified with the drug trade since 1870, or for a period of 
about forty-eight years. He was born in Brooklyn, New York, November 18, 1855, 
and is a son of George and Mary Scherer, who came to Chicago in 1856. The father 
was a barber and both he and his wife have now passed away. 

Andrew Scherer acquired his education in public and private schools and also 
pursued a course in a business college. He then entered upon an apprenticeship with 
Ludwig Fernow, a druggist, and after the death of Mr. Fernow the store was sold 
to the firm of Weber & Luckhardt, whose establishment, situated at the corner of 
Polk and State streets, was burned in the second Chicago fire. Mr. Scherer entered 
upon his aj^prenticeship when a youth of fifteen years and was employed in the 
P'ernow establishment until the death of Mr. Fernow in 1873, covering a period of 
three and a half years, while later he spent six months with his successors. In 1875 
Mr. Scherer was graduated from the Chicago College of Pharmacy and thus added 
broad theoretical and scientific training to his practical experience. He spent five 
years as a clerk in the employ of C. M. Weinberger and in 1881 he opened a drug 
store on his own account at No. 381 East Division street. This he conducted until 
1887, when he removed to No. 1201 North State street, where he has since been 
located. He purchased grovuid here and erected a building and has the oldest drug 
store in his part of the city. It has always been a well appointed establishment, car- 
rying an extensive line of goods, and from the beginning the business has prospered, 
while his courteous treatment of his patrons, his honorable dealing and his enterprise 
have secured to him a continuance of the trade. 

Mr. Scherer married Miss Agnes- Mary Dieden, of Chicago, and after her death 
he was married to Cordelia ^laher, who passed away in 1914. His son, Andrew C, 
born of the first marriage, is now a civil engineer in the ordnance department of the 



248 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

United States army with the rank of first lieutenant. He was graduated from the 
University of Wisconsin with the class of 1910, pursuing the civil engineering course, 
after which he spent two and a half years in Mexico with Robert Hunt & Company, 
and he has gained distinguished honors in steel engineering. 

Mr. Scherer is a member of the Chicago Drug Club, of the Chicago Retail 
Druggists Association, in which he served as treasurer at an early day, the Illinois 
Pharmaceutical Association, of which he was at one time vice president, the Chicago 
College of Pharmacy, of which he has been treasurer, and the Chicago Veteran 
Druggists Association. He joined the last named organization in 1901, being the 
first i^erson to be selected for membership therein after the organization was effected. 
He has been honored with its presidency and he is prominently known in trade 
circles. In politics he has always maintained an independent course, preferring to 
vote for men and measures rather than party. He is never remiss in the duties of 
citizenship, however, but stands loyally for those interests which he believes most 
Avtjrth while to the community and ever attempts to uphold high standards of manhood 
and citizenship. 



HENRY MARISON BYLLESBY. 

Henry Marison BvHesby, president of the firm of H. M. Byllesby & Company, 
is probably one of the best known electrical engineers of the day. Becoming asso- 
ciated with Thomas A. Edison at the beginning of his career Mr. Byllesby has 
for over a quarter of a century played a iDrominent part in the development of 
electric lighting and power systems, both as an inventor and a promoter, and has 
been identified with many of the large hydro-electric enterprises throughout the 
country. 

His birth occurred in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, February 16, 1859, his parents 
being the Rev. DeWitt Clinton and Sarah (Matthews) Byllesby. The family is 
of English lineage. Laughlin Byllesby, the grandfather, came from Lincolnshire 
at an early day and settled at Eaton, Pennsylvania. The Rev. DeWitt C. Byllesby, 
a native of the Keystone state, devoted his life to the ministry of the Protestant 
Episcopal church in Pennsylvania and had two brothers, Marison and Faver, who 
were also prominent clergymen of that faith. He married Sarali Matthews, a daugh- 
ter of Simeon Matthews, of Orange, New Jersey, who belonged to one of the 
earliest families of that place. Three children were born unto the Rev. Byllesby 
and his wife: Henry M., of this review; Mary L., living in Chicago, Illinois; and 
Mrs. James S. Cummins, of Chicago. The mother died in 187G and the father 
passed away in 1891, having reached the age of sixty-five years. 

Henry M. Byllesby acquired his education in private circles, finishing with a 
course in mechanical engineering in the Lehigh University of South Bethlehem, 
Pennsylvania. LTpon leaving school he became an apprentice of the Corliss Engine 
Works of Robert Wetherill & Company of Chester, Pennsylvania, and in 1881 
entered the employ of Thomas A. Edison as draftsman of the Edison Electric 
Light Company. After about a year in that department he was promoted to 
the engineering department where he continued until November, 1885, and in tliat 
connection was identified with the earlv work of the concern. He made all of 




HENRY M. BYLLESBY 



THE ^^I^^^■ ''"■^^ 



ASTOK. 
B 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 251 

the drawings and many of the designs for the first central station of the Edison 
Electric Light Company in New York city and during the last two years had entire 
charge of the company's operations in Canada. In 1885 he and others organized 
and incorporated the Westinghouse Electric Company of which he was the first 
vice president and general manager for the first five years of its existence. He 
was also one of the organizers and managing directors of the Westinghouse Electric 
Company of London, England, until 1890. Since that time he has been continuously 
connected with the development of electric lighting, electric street railway, electric 
water power and gas companies and lias been identified with the promotion and 
upbuilding of a vast number of enterprises in various parts of the country. He is 
large!}' responsible for the development of the alternating current system of electric 
lighting and has taken out over forty patents on various distribution systems and 
electrical apparatus. 

Mr. Byllesby has occupied the office of first vice president of the Electric Vehicle 
Company of New York city ; vice president of the Washington Traction & Elec- 
tric Company of Washington, D. C. ; and vice president of the Portland General 
Electric Company of Portland, Oregon. The last named company he organized 
and was largely instrumental in financing and constructing its plant, its water 
power development being one of the first large enterprises of the kind in the 
country. He was likewise jsresident of the Northwest General Electric Company. 
In January, 1901, he organized the firm of H. ^I. Byllesby & Company, Inc., of 
Chicago, consulting, designing and construction engineers, later adding to the busi- 
ness a general banking department. He has since devoted his attention principally 
to the management of the affairs of this concern, which has become one of the 
largest of its kind in the world. At the present day he holds the following important 
offices: president of H. M. Byllesby & Company, Inc., of Chicago; president or 
vice president of the San Diego Consolidated Gas & Electric Company, of San 
Diego, California ; Northern Idaho & Montana Power ComjDany ; Oklahoma Gas 
& Electric Company of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; Appalachian Power Company 
operating in Virginia and West Virginia; Mobile Electric Company of INIobile, 
Alabama; Fort Smith Light & Traction Company of Fort Smith, Arkansas; Tacoma 
Gas Company of Tacoma, Washington ; Pueblo and Suburban Light & Traction 
Company of Pueblo, Colorado; Everett Gas Company of Everett, Washington; 
Muskogee Gas & Electric Company of Muskogee, Oklahoma ; Southwestern Gen- 
eral Gas Company of Fort Smith, Arkansas; Standard Gas & Electric Company; 
Interstate Power Comj^any, operating in northern Illinois and in southern Wis- 
consin; Northern States Power Company of St. Paul, Minnesota; Western States 
Gas & Electric Company of California; Ottumwa Railway & Light Company of 
Ottumwa, Iowa; Enid Electric & Gas Company of Enid, Oklahoma; and the 
Utilities Investment Company of Delaware. He is a director in all the foregoing 
corporations ; also the Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound Railway ; the Public 
Securities Company of Chicago; the Public Utilities Company of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts ; and the United Utilities Company of London, England. He is a member 
of the American Society of Civil Engineers, the American Society of Mechanical 
Engineers, the American Institute of Electrical Engineers and is one of the execu- 
tive committee of the National Electric Light Association. 

Mr. Byllesby was married, in 1882, to Miss Margaret Stearns Baldwin, a 
daughter of the late H. P. Baldwin, of the New Jersey Central Railroad, and they 



Vol. IV— 14 



252 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

reside at No. 4358 Drexel boulevard. His social affiliations are with the Union 
League, Chicago, Mid-Day, South Shore Country and Glen View Clubs of Chicago ; 
the Minnesota Club, of St. Paul; the Arlington Club, of Portland, Oregon; and 
the Lawyers, Railroad and Metropolitan Clubs of New York city. He is also a 
member of the Chicago Art Institute and is president of the Chicago Civic Federa- 
tion. These alone indicate something of the breadth of his interests and activities 
and yet a man of more limited powers and activities would feel that his time was 
fully occupied with the extensive and important business affairs which claim the 
attention of Mr. Byllesby and which have prospered and progressed through the 
stimulus of his activity and his capable direction resulting from his keen insight 
into every situation and his power of coordinating forces into a harmonious and 
unified whole. The initiative spirit is strong within him and it has been one of 
the delights of his life to advance into new fields and bring to successful solution 
the problems therein found. 



WALTER W. MORRIS. 



Walter W. Morris, actively engaged in the undertaking business in Chicago, was 
born in Clinton, Illinois, July 9, 1885, a son of Christopher C. and Alice (Cline) 
Morris. The father was a farmer by occupation and devoted his life to that pursuit. 

Walter W. Morris spent his youthful days in his parents' home and supplemented 
his early educational privileges by a high school course, while later he attended 
Brown's Business College at Decatur, Illinois. He worked as assistant secretary in 
the college for a year and a half and in 1906 came to Chicago, where he has since 
carried on business. He became connected with undertaking as an employe of C. H. 
Jordan & Company and continued with that house until the fall of 1908. In the 
sirring of 1909 he entered the employ of the Western Casket & Undertaking Com- 
pany, opening their branch store at No. 6359 South Halsted street. This he has 
since managed and has made of it a profitable undertaking by reason of his thorough 
understanding of the business, his efficiency, his close application and liis indefati- 
gable industry. While engaged in the undertaking business he also pursued a course 
in law, being a graduate of the Chicago Kent College of Law. in which he com- 
pleted his course by graduation with the class of 1915. He passed the required bar 
examination in July of that year and thus qualified for active practice, but his 
purpose in studying law was simj^ly to have a knowledge thereof, recognizing how 
valuable this is to any business man. 

In 1908 Mr. Morris was united in marriage to Miss Georgia L. Hilt, who was 
born in Aurora, Illinois. She is a daughter of George L. and Mary Hilt, who at the 
time of their marriage were residents of Chicago. Mr. and Mrs. Morris have become 
the parents of a son, Weldon H., who was born March 30, 1913. 

Mr. Morris is a member of Jackson Park Lodge, No. 915, A. F. & A. M., and 
also of Normal Park Chapter, No. 710, R. A. M., and both he and his wife have 
membership in Rainbow Chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star. He is also 
connected with the Modern Woodmen of America and he gives his political allegiance 
to the republican party. He was reared in that faith, to which his family have 
adhered since the organization of the party. His uncle. Judge Lawrence Weldon, 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 253 

"was a law partner of Abraham Lincoln. Mr. Morris is a very active and earnest 
member of the Englewood Christian church and he also belongs to the Englewood 
Fellowship Club, being intensely interested in everything that tends to uplift the 
individual and advance the welfare of the community. 



FREDERICK MORGAN STEELE. 

The ancestry of the Steele family of which Frederick iSIorgan Steele is a rep- 
resentative can be traced back not only through various generations in this countrj' 
to an early period in the colonization of the new world, but also to England. Two 
brothers, John and George Steele, arrived in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1632^ 
and as the years have run their course to the present time their descendants have 
taken active and prominent part in shaping the history of the various localities in 
which they have resided. Among the ancestors of Frederick M. Steele was Governor 
William Bradford who made the voyage on the Mayflower in 1620, Governor John 
Webster, Governor Peter Schuyler, of New York, Governor Rip Van Dam of New 
York, Captain Roger Clap, the historian of Massachusetts Bay colony, and from both 
progenitors of the Livingston family of New York. 

Fortunate is a man who has back of him an ancestry honorable and distinguished, 
and hapjjy is he if his lines of life have been cast in harmony therewith. In person, 
in talents and in character Frederick Morgan Steele is a worthy scion of his race. 
His father, John F. Steele, was a young hardware merchant in the city of Albany, 
New York, recognized not only as a man of great promise but of most attractive 
nature, and so deep was the regard he inspired that he was frequently called the 
"beloved John" by his numerous friends and associates. He died of pneumonia at 
the comparatively early age of thirty-three years. His wife, Mrs. Frances Mary 
(Steele) Steele, was a lady of marked literary talent and was among the first to use 
her powers in that direction for the advancement of women. In her early woman- 
hood she had much to do with establishment of circulating libraries. After her 
removal to Chicago she became a prominent member of the Chicago Woman's Club 
and as such was a leading spirit in the establishment of the Women's Protective 
Agency, being known as the "mother" of the organization. Throughout her entire 
life she was a frequent contributor to magazines and newspapers and her writings, 
widely read, were of marked influence. She died on Easter morning, the 1 ith of 
April, 1895. 

Frederick Morgan Steele was born in Albany, New York, November 27, 1851, 
and acquired his education in the public schools of New England. He came to 
Chicago in 1879 when a young man of about twenty-seven years, and here became 
connected with railway manufacturing enterpries, establishing and promoting the 
Chicago Forge & Bolt Company and the American Bridge Works, two of the lead- 
ing corporations in their line in this city. Possessing an initiative spirit and the 
power of coordinating forces, he was active in the management of large industrial 
enterprises. .At the present writing he is the president and treasurer of the 
Standard Forgings Company which succeeded the Chicago Forge & Bolt Company 
^ and is one of the most extensive producers of car axles in the United States. At 



254 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

one time he was the president of three railroads which have since been merged into 
larger systems. He is now the vice president of the Salt Lake Southern Railway 
Company and vice president of the Highland Park State Bank. He has never 
hesitated to advance where favoring opportunity has led the way and in his business 
career progressiveness and conservatism are well balanced forces. 

Mr. Steele M-as married in Chicago on the 6th of Xovember, 1883, to Miss Ella 
A. Pratt, a daughter of William H. H. and Roxanna (Roe) Pratt. She is descended 
from Governor Thomas Welles, one of the early colonial governors of Connecticut. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Steele were born a son and a daughter: Frederick P., who died 
in early childhood; and Elizabeth Livingston, who on the 18th of June, 1908, at 
Highland Park, Illinois, became the wife of George Washington Childs. 

Mr. Steele has always been deeply interested in historic and genealogical research. 
He is now serving as deputy governor general of the Society of the Mayflower 
Descendants, was former governor of the Illinois organization, and was numbered 
among those who assisted in its formation and establishment. He is not unknown as 
a writer of merit and in 1909 published a little volume of his poems under the title 
of "After Hour Idyls." which in sentiment and literary construction will stand close 
criticism. His wife possesses notable artistic talent as manifest in ceramic work 
which appeared at the Paris Exposition in 1900 and the World's Columbian Expo- 
sition in 1893. She has been for many years an officer in the Daughters of the 
American Revolution, occupying various positions from secretary to regent. She 
was president of the iVtlan Club of Chicago and has been a prominent worker in the 
Gads Hill settlement on the North Shore. She is now president of the colony of 
New England Women of Illinois. In 1901 Mr. and Mrs. Steele and their daughter 
sailed from America on a two years' world's tour for pleasure and education. Their 
keen delight in antiquities and in all that is rare and artistic, prompted them to 
secure a most attractive collection of old and interesting curios and art treasures 
on their trip. ^Ir. Steele, who for thirty-six years has been gathering historical data 
and autograph manuscripts, probably possesses one of the largest collections of this 
kind in the United States and has the largest collection of manuscript hymns in 
the world. He is himself a writer and has written the song of Illinois, which has 
already won wide approval and is given below. He travels to a considerable extent 
and much of the time spent on railway trains has been employed in his compositions. 
He is an active member of the Sons of the American Revolution, belongs to the 
Highland Park Club, of which he was formerly vice president, and to the Union 
League Club. His political allegiance is given to tlie republican party and he is an 
officer in the Presbyterian denomination. While a man of marked commercial spirit, 
with ability to formulate and execute plans resulting in mammoth undertakings, his 
success has allowed him leisure to cultivate graces of character and the higher 
interests of life until companionship with Frederick Morgan Steele has come to 
mean expansion and elevation. Both Mr. and Mrs. Steele are prominent and influen- 
tial factors in the social circles of this city where intelligence is regarded as an essen- 
tial attribute to agreeableness. Travel, study and research have gained for them 
prominence in various fields of knowledge, while recognition of the responsibilities 
of wealth and a sincere interest in their fellowmen have prompted them to put forth 
effective effort for the amelioration of the hard conditions of life for tlie unfortunate. 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 



255 



Illinois! 

(Meaning: "We are men!") 

Air:— "Baby Mine." 



O'er thy rivers, gently flowing, 

Illinois, Illinois, 
Where thy stately corn is growing, 

Illinois, Illinois, 
Hark! that word to us, so dear. 
With its message bold and clear, 
'Tis the name we love to hear, 

Illinois, Illinois, — 
"Tis the name we love to hear, 

Illinois ! 



Thou hast heard thy Country calling, 

Illinois, Illinois, 
Mid the din of War appalling, 

Illinois, Illinois, 
Then thy courage and thy will 
Rose each heart to fire and thrill ! 
Brave and loyal thou art still 

Illinois, Illinois, — 
Brave and loyal thou art still 

Illinois ! 



See ! 'mid flow'rs in mighty measure, 

Illinois, Illinois, 
Golden Rod, thy yellow treasure, 

Illinois, Illinois, 
'Tis the emblem of thy host 
Gathered here from ev'ry coast — 
Stalwart hearts, thy pride and boast, 

Illinois, Illinois, — 
Stalwart hearts, thy. pride and boast, 

Illinois ! 



While thy Lincoln's fame is cherished, 

Illinois, Illinois, 
Till thy Logan's name has perished, 

Illinois, Illinois, 
While thy Grant shall honored be 
Thro' our Nation grand and free. 
We shall love and honor thee, 

Illinois, Illinois, — 
We shall love and honor thee, 

Illinois ! 



Pride of all thy sons and daughters, 

Illinois, Illinois, 
By thy peopled inland waters, 

Illinois, Illinois, 
Fair Cliicago, great and grand. 
Wealth and progress on each hand, 
Welcome gives to ev'ry land, 

Illinois, Illinois, — 
Welcome gives to ev'ry land, 

Illinois ! 



W^hile thy glory we are singing, 

Illinois, Illinois, 
Loyal homage to thee bringing, 

Illinois, Illinois, 
Let us praise His holy Name 
Thro' Whose might all good we claim, 
Who has wrought thy wondrous fame, 

Illinois. Illinois, — 
Who has wrought thy wondrous fame, 

Illinois ! 

Frederick M. Steele. 



DENNIS STEPHEN SATTLER. 



There are few men more prominently or widely known in the undertaking business 
in the middle west than Dennis Stephen Sattler, who is the president of the Western 
Casket and Undertaking Company. He was born in Buena Vista, Ohio, in 1868, a 
son of Dennis and Catherine (Haines) Sattler. The father was a farmer by occupa- 
tion in early life. Both he and his wife reached an advanced age, Mr. Sattler passing 
away at the age of eighty-three, while his wife traveled to the eighty-ninth milestone 



256 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

on life's journey ere called to the home beyond. In 1874 they removed from Ohio to 
Illinois^ settling at Morris. 

Dennis Stephen Sattler spent his youthful days in Morris, Illinois; acquired a 
public school education there and in 1886 he removed to Chicago where he took up 
the study of pharmacy in the Chicago College of Pharmacy. He then entered the 
drug business on his own account in 1891, establishing a store at Adams street and 
Center avenue, Chicago, where he continued for a decade or until 1901, when he 
became president of the Western Casket Company. Gradually he took over more and 
more responsibility in this connection and in 1911 was elected to the presidency of 
the Western Casket and Undertaking Company. This company is one of the best 
known in the undertaking business. 

In 1901 Mr. Sattler was united in marriage to Miss Mary Hines of Chicago, and 
to them have been born three children: Kathryn, Mary and Rose. The religious faith 
of the family is indicated by their connection with Our Lady of Lourdes' Catholic 
church. Mr. Sattler has membership with the Knights of Columbus and for two 
years served as lecturer of the Chicago Council. He is also a member of the Modern 
Woodmen of America, the Royal League, the Lions Club of Illinois, the Manu- 
facturing Association, and of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. In political 
belief he is a democrat, yet he does not hesitate to cast an independent ballot if his 
judgment dictates the wisdom of such a course. 

The name of the Western Casket and Undertaking Company has become a 
synonym for efficient service, honor and ability in that line of business. The com- 
pany was established in 1910, the first officers being: Dennis Stephen Sattler, 
president and treasurer; J. H. Tischart, secretary; and W^. E. Gerry, vice jiresident 
and general manager. The business is located at the corner of Michigan avenue and 
Randolph street, the company leasing the entire building occupying space of forty by 
eighty feet. In this building are offices, display rooms, chapels, morgue, etc. 

Mr. Tischart, secretary of the company, passed away in 1912, and was succeeded 
by P'rederick M. McCuen who remains as the secretary of the company. The com- 
pany maintains several branches located throughout the city for the convenience of 
its patrons. 



CHARLES ALBERT COMISKEY. 

Charles Albert Comiskey, sole owner of the White Sox Baseball Club as well 
as their home, Comiskey Park, Chicago, stands at the top among the financial kings 
of baseball and is one of the foremost and most successful men connected with the 
national pastime in its entire history. A native of Chicago, born August 15, 1859, 
son of John and Mary Ann (Kearns) Comiskey, he was reared in his native city 
where he received his education, graduating from Ignatius College. His identi- 
fication with baseball as a player, and like all who attain prominence, began when 
but a youngster. He was a natural-born ball player. His first knowledge of the game 
was secured on the lots of Chicago while his professional identification began in 1876, 
In that year, and before he was seventeen years old, he played third base position 
for Milwaukee. The following year he played at Elgin, Illinois, as a pitcher, in. 
which capacity he displayed great jiromise. From the latter club he went to 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 257 

Dubuque, Iowa, in 1878, and remained there during that season and those of 1879, 
1880 and 1881. Young Comiskey's work with the Dubuque team brought him to the 
attention of the owners of the St. Louis Browns, then in the American Association. 
Joining this club in 1882 he became captain and played first base. In 1883 he 
became manager of the St. Louis Browns, a capacity in which he continued to act 
until 1892. It was while a member of this club that he achieved his great reputation 
not only as a player but as a captain and manager. Under his direction the St. 
Louis Browns became one of the greatest teams in the history of the game. With 
them during this period originated many new styles of play, not a few of which yet 
remain distinct features of up-to-date inside baseball. It was Mr. Comiskey who 
originated and successfully demonstrated the advantage of deep first base play, 
depending on the pitcher to cover the base. With a personality and force of 
character that naturally made him a leader he combined a superior practical 
knowledge of the game, an equipment that no doubt had much to do with the success 
of the team he directed. While their head, the St. Louis Browns won the champion- 
ship of the American Association in 1885, 1886, 1887 and the world's championship 
in 1885 and 1886. The four successive pennants won by this club in the American 
Association is a record in the major leagues that has never been equaled. In 1892 
Mr. Comiskey became captain and manager of the Cincinnati National League team 
and remained there in a managerial capacity during 1892, 1893 and 1894. In 1895 
he became the owner of the St. Paul Club in the Western League, retaining that 
connection during 1895, 1896, 1897, 1898 and 1899. As an owner at St. Paul Mr. 
Comiskev had been successful and at the oraranizalion of the American League in 
1900 he became the owner of the Chicago franchise in that organization. 

Up to this time Chicago had never been a member of any major league but the 
National and while one of the best ball cities in the country, it seemed a foolhardy 
move to attempt to successfully operate a club in opposition to the old organiza- 
tin. Mr. Comiskey thouglit differently, an opinion, which, if wrong, meant his 
financial ruin. The American League was attempting to do what a number of 
times previously had proven a failure — establish a second major organization. Its 
franchise did not carry the absolute protection given bj^ the National League, with 
its wealth and prestige. Consequently an American League franchise at that time 
did not represent much, if any value, except to men like Charles A. Comiskey, who 
had implicit confidence in the success of the plan of the new organization. At that 
time a franchise was a long ways from a ball club meriting patronage and a home 
for its exhibitions, but Mr. Comiskey backed his judgment with every dollar at his 
command and subsequent results have shown the wisdom of his course. Grounds 
were secured at Thirty-ninth and Wentworth and his club became known as the 
White Sox. The great popularity of the team and its owner was in evidence from 
the first and a patronage surpassing the most sanguine expectations soon came to 
them. In 1910 Mr. Comiskey transferred his club to Comiskey Park, Thirty-fifth 
and Shields avenue, where he erected one of the finest baseball plants in the country 
at an outlay of probably more than the combined cost of all the American League 
plants at the inception of the organization. The White Sox were pennant-winners 
in 1900, 1906; world's championship winners in 1906; and winners of the city cham- 
pionship -in 1911. Mr. Comiskey's success is but that of a business man who studies 
closely the requirements of his patrons and never break faitli with them. He has 
made baseball his business. When a player he took his vocation seriously and made 



258 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

it his business, not a pastime, tried to do his best and never forgot that he owed his 
employer his best efforts. No greater advocate of clean sport can be found in any 
walk of life. He has played the part of a clean, high-class sportsman, and has 
stanchly stood for the betterment of the game through the elimination of pool 
selling, liquor and the bad element generally. When a few years ago a majority 
of the officials contended that it was impossible to make the game pay without these 
accessories, he stoutly maintained that the game would become greater and more 
successful financially without them. Results have proved the wisdom of his con- 
tention. When the ticket speculators tried to jDrofit by the popularity of his team, 
he hired his own detectives and landed them in jail. In the management of his ball 
park and team he has always kept faith with his patrons and looked for his profits 
at the gate. Mr. Comiskey pays strict attention to business and is always in touch 
with his team whether at home or on the road. He is popular with his men but 
any man playing for him would rather tackle a sawmill than be called into the office 
for a lecture by "the old Roman." He does not swear at nor upbraid offenders, but 
says things based on his perfect knowledge of the game and the men's weaknesses, 
that are more effective than any torrent of abuse could possibly be. He mav be 
said to be an optimist, never yielding to discouragement and always confident of 
success. It has been said of him that he never went into a game he did not expect 
to win and he felt it in his heart as truly as his spoken word indicated. Take one 
illustration: In 1886 when the St. Louis Browns won the pennant in the American 
Association and Chicago had won the National League pennant, A. G. Spalding, 
who had the Chicago team in charge gave out, as the condition to meeting the Browns 
for the world's championship, a Avinner-take-all clause. Mr. Comiskey replied "You're 
on," and if he could have thought of a shorter affirmative, he would have used it. 
The Chicago National Club at that time was a formidable aggregation of ball players 
yet the club under Mr. Comiskey drew the big purse. 

The personal popularity of Mr. Comiskey is truly remarkable and has been no 
small factor in his success. A true friend, whose manifestation of sympathy is not 
confined to a mere jDrotestation but invariably in a more helpful and substantial 
manner he never forgets a favor or declines an opportunity to return one. He is 
systematic and painstaking in whatever he undertakes and whatever he does, he 
does in the best possible manner. Mr. Comiskey has not lived solely to accumulate. 
He is able to consult his wishes and satisfy his desires for the luxuries and comforts 
of life as well as to give liberally to charity and benevolent projects. He belongs to 
the South Shore, Chicago Yacht, Illinois Athletic and Chicago Automobile Clubs. 

Mr. Comiskey married Miss Nancy Kelly, of Dubuque, Iowa, and has one son^ 
John L., who is closelv identified with the business interests of his father. 



JAMES HICKEY. 



James Hickey is engaged in the undertaking business in Chicago as the successor 
of his father, George A. V. Hickey, who was a well known business man of the city 
and equally well known by reason of his activity in Catholic circles and his charity 
and benevolence. James Hickey was born in Chicago, July 28, 1881, and acquired 
his education in the parochial schools. He qualified for his professional career as a 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 259 

student in the Barnes Sohpol of Embalming and obtained his state license and city 
license in 1902. He then entered the undertaking business with his father, under 
whom he had already had practical experience along the line of his chosen profession. 
In lOOi he established business on his own account at Sixty- fourth street and Cottage 
Grove avenue and in 1906 removed to No. 1602 West Thirty-fifth street. In 1914 he 
erected the building at No. 1610 West Thirty-fifth street, which he remodeled, 
thoroughly equipping it for the purpose for which it is used. This building is twenty- 
five by one hundred and twenty-five feet and two stories in height and is a brick 
structure. He maintains his home also on the first floor, while above there is a six- 
room apartment from which he derives a good rental. In the rear of the building is 
a garage and he is the owner of two limousine cars and one touring car, which he 
uses in funeral service. 

On the 7th of September, 1904, Mr. Hickey was united in marriage to Miss Grace 
Keating, of Chicago, a daughter of James Keating. They have become parents of 
four children: Armand, twelve years of age; James, aged seven; Ralph, aged five; 
and Joseph, who was the second child and died in infancy. 

Mr. Hickey is a member of the Chicago Undertakers Association and also of the 
Chicago Motor Liverymen's Association. He belongs to Our Lady of Good Counsel 
Catholic church and is identified with several fraternal societies, including the 
Knights of Columbus, the Catholic Order of Foresters, the Knights of The Macca- 
bees and the Knights and Ladies of Security. 



JOHN WILLIAM ALLEN. 

John William Allen has long been well known in business circles of Chicago as 
the head of the firm conducting business under the name of J. W. Allen & Company, 
at Nos. 110-118 North Peoria street, dealers in bakers' and confectioners' supplies. 
His birth occurred near Ann Arbor, Washtenaw county, Michigan, on the 4th of 
September, 1848, his parents being Almond A. and Lucy (Powell) Allen, both of 
whom were born near Rochester, New York. They passed away in Michigan. 
Almond A. Allen participated in the Civil war. He was sent west to assist in quelling 
the Indian disturbances and lost his health, which never was entirely restored. 

John W. Allen began attending the country schools of Calhoun county, Michigan, 
when a little lad of seven years and for five years his big Newfoundland dog drew 
him to and from school on a sled, as he was a cripple and almost helpless for five 
years. When a youth of seventeen he began learning the milling business at Battle 
Creek and Ann Arbor, Michigan, and on attaining his majority came to Chicago, 
here securing a clerkship with the firm of Lyman & Silliman, tea and coffee mer- 
chants, in whose employ he remained for twelve years. On the expiration of that 
period he had accumulated sufficient capital to enable him to embark in business on 
his own account, but lost his earnings through the failure of the Fidelity Savings 
Bank. Later he was offered and accepted five hundred dollars for his bank book and 
again went to work to increase his financial resources. At the end of two years he 
began business at No. 80 Van Buren street, remaining at that location for eighteen 
years. He then removed to No. 208 Washington boulevard, where he occupied a five- 
story building for nine years. At the expiration of that period he built a modern 



260 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

reinforced concrete and brick structure of four stories and basement at Nos. 110-118 
North Peoria street, where he is now conducting business. He is now at the head of 
an extensive and jorofitable corporation, dealing in bakers' and confectioners' 
supplies under the name of J. W. Allen & Company. Some idea of the growth of the 
concern may be gained from the fact that when he started out in business he did all 
of the work himself and at present requires the assistance of a large force of 
employes. He is likewise the owner of the old Windiate farm in Calhoun county, 
Michigan. His life record is one which merits both admiration and emulation. 
Though in early life handicapped both physically and financially, he has worked his 
way steadily upward to a position of prominence and influence in ±he community. 

On the 30th of December, 1872, Mr. Allen was united in marriage to Miss Emma 
M. Windiate, a daughter of William and Almira (Mead,) Windiate, of Calhoun 
county, Michigan. Unto them was born one son, Harry W., who is now the secretary 
and treasurer of the firm of J. W. Allen & Company. Harry W. Allen is married 
and has a son, Frank W., who is now eleven years of age. 

In politics Mr. Allen is a republican, loyally supporting the men and measures 
of that party. He belongs to the Chicago Association of Commerce and the Illinois 
Manufacturers' Association, also the National Master Bakers' Association and is a 
worthy exemplar of the Masonic fraternity. Motoring and fishing afford him 
pleasure and recreation. His record is an illustration of the fact that opportunity is 
oi^en to all. With a nature that could not be content with mediocrity, his laudable 
ambition has prompted him to put forth untiring and practical effort until he has 
long since left the ranks of the many and stands among the successful few. 



MARTIN M. COONEY. 



Martin M. Cooney, engaged in the undertaking business, was born in Spring- 
field, Illinois, August 20, 1871, a son of Thomas and Bridget (Finan) Cooney, both 
of whom were natives of Ireland. The father came to the United States in 1869 and 
was married in this country to Miss Finan. He was a farmer by occupation and 
also engaged in coal mining, but is now living retired, enjoying a well earned rest 
at his Chicago home. 

After acquiring his education in parochial and public schools ^lartin M. Cooney 
began work in an overall factory and later was employed in connection with the 
rolling mill business from 1889 until 1907. Gradually in that connection he worked 
his way upward, added responsibilities being accompanied by increased wages, but 
desirous of engaging in business on his own account, he left his position in 1907 to 
open an undertaking establishment in the Arcade building in Pullman. In 1913 he 
removed to his present location at No. 11508 Michigan avenue, where he occupies 
a room twenty-five by seventy feet containing a chapel with a seating capacity of 
sixty. He has two limousines and a service car and splendid equipment for the 
conduct of the undertaking business in a most progressive and modern manner. He 
belongs to the Chicago Undertakers Association and also to the Chicago Motor Livery- 
men's Association. 

On the 21st of February, 1900, i\Ir. Cooney was united in marriage to Miss 
Brigid F. Duffy, a native of Ireland, who came to Pullman in her childhood with her 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 261 

parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Duffy. To Mr. and Mrs. Cooney have been born 
four children, Veronica C, Martin M., Bernice B. and Mary, but the last named 
died in infancy. 

Mr. Cooney is a member of San Salvador Council, No. 1262, of the Knights of 
Columbus and was its financial secretary, serving for ten years. He also belongs to 
Holy Rosary Court, No. 131, C. O. F., and to Division Lodge, No. 29, A. O. H., 
Wilmington Tent, No. 233, K. O. T. M., Roseland Camp, No. 11602, M. W. A., 
and the Loyal Order of Moose. His religious faith is indicated by his membership 
in the Holy Rosary Catholic church. His political endorsement is given to the 
democratic parfy and he keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day 
although he does not seek nor desire office as a reward for party fealty. He is truly 
a self-made man in the best sense of the term. He has gradually worked his way 
upward through persistent effort and energy and, advancing step by step, is now in 
control of a substantial business which is bringing to him well deserved success. 



GEORGE JAMES PHILLIPS. 

In industrial circles in Chicago the name of George James Phillips is well known. 
He is the president of the Phillips-Getschow Company, heating, ventilating and 
power contractors, and possesses a scientific and practical knowledge of the business 
that has placed him in prominent trade relations. He was born in Quebec, Canada, 
January 31, 1860, a son of George T. and Jane (Brown) Phillips. The father was 
also a native of Quebec and was a brass founder and power engineer who spent his 
entire life in his native country, there passing away in 1903. His wife is also 
deceased. He was of Welsh descent, while Mrs. Phillips was of Scotch-Irish lineage. 
George James Phillips acquired his education in private schools of Quebec and 
in the Levis College, pursuing a technical course. For nine years he was associated 
with his father in business and received most thorough practical training in that con- 
nection. For three years he was identified with the firm of Robert Mitchell & 
Company of Montreal, thus engaged in steam heating, manufacturing and power 
work. His broadening experience constantly developed his ability and promoted his 
efficiency. In December, 1891, he came to Chicago and went upon the road for the 
Boynton Furniture Company, for which he traveled for four years. In January, 
1896, he engaged in business on his own account, entering into partnership with 
William Creed under the firm style of Phillips & Creed. That association was 
maintained for a year, after which Mr. Phillips conducted business under his own 
name for three years or until 1900, when he organized the Phillips-Getschow Com- 
pany, of which he has since been the president. They are large contractors in the 
installation of steam heating, ventilating and power plants and have done the work 
in many of the largest and finest buildings of the city, including the following: 
Majestic theatre. Consumers building, Kesner building, Medinah Temple, the 
industrial plants of the Miehle Printing Press Company, the Chicago Mill & Lumber 
Company, the American Chicle Company, the Fuller-Morrisson Company, A. B. Dick 
& Company, twenty-eight buildings for Joseph Downey and many fine north shore 
' residences and now have the contract for the new Field Museum. Important and 
extensive as are Mr. Phillips' interests in this connection, he also has extended his 



262 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

efforts into other fields and is now interested in the Sloan Valve Manufacturing Com- 
pany^ the Ideal Fuel & Lumber Company and in other corporations. 

Mr. Phillips was married in Quebec on the 17th of Sei^tember, 1888, to Miss 
Edith H. Hatch, a daughter of Thomas Hatch, of Quebec, who was a building con- 
tractor. They maintain a residence in Wilmette. In jjolitics Mr. Phillips pursues 
an independent course. He belongs to St. Augustine's Eiiiscojjal church of Wilmette, 
of which he is a vestryman, and he is identified with the Illinois Athletic Club and 
other social organizations of the city. He is likewise a thirty-second degree Mason 
and member of the Mystic Shrine, while along business lines he has become well 
known and in 1899 and 1900 served as treasurer of the Master Steamfitters and is 
likewise connected with the Building Construction Employers Association. The 
interests of his life are evenly balanced, making his a well rounded character. With- 
out any phenomenal characteristics, he is a man of mature judgment, eminently a 
man of business sense, easily avoiding the mistakes and disasters that come to those 
who, though possessing remarkable faculties in some respects, are liable to erratic 
movements that result in unwarranted risk and failure. He has ever been possessed 
of sufficient courage to venture where favoring opportunity is presented and his 
judgment and even-paced energy have carried him forward to the goal of prosperity. 
Anyone meeting him face to face would know at once that he is an individual embody- 
ing all the elements of what in this country we term a "square" man — one in whom 
to have confidence, — a deiDendable man in any relation and any emergency. 



CHARLES E. LACKORE. 

Close apiolication and indefatigable energy- have won for Charles E. Lackore the 
success which he is now enjoying as one of the successful undertakers of Chicago. He 
was born on the 17th of Februarv, 1862, in the citv in which he vet makes his home, 
his parents being T. W. and Mary (Frisbie) Lackore, the former a native of New 
York, Avhile the latter was born in Ohio. The father came to Chicago in 1851 and 
was married in this city, the marriage being celebrated in a residence at the corner of 
Monroe and La Salle streets, which was then the residential district of the city, in 
the home of Augustus Frisbie, a brother of the bride. In 1849 Mr. Lackore crossed 
the plains to California, attracted by the discovery of gold on the Pacific coast, and it 
was subsequent to his return to Chicago that he was married. He afterward engaged 
in the hay and ice business, and in 1872 removed to Morgan Park, becoming one of 
the first settlers of that attractive suburb. In 1878 he removed to western Kansas, 
where he continued to make his home until called to his final rest in 1893. His 
widow still survives and is now living in Seattle, Washington, at the age of eighty- 
three years. 

Charles E. Lackore acquired his public school education in Kansas and in Chicago 
and afterward had the advantag-e of a business course in the Brvant & Stratton 
Commercial College. He entered the livery business in Morgan Park in 1888 and in 
1890 extended the scope of his activities to include the undertaking business, of which 
he has made a close study. He successfully passed the state examination and was 
among the first to secure a state license, his number being 143. He continued to 
engage in both the livery business and undertaking until 1914, when he disposed of 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 263 

his interests along the former line and is now concentrating his efforts upon the care, 
management and development of the undertaking business. In 1909 he erected a 
building for his purpose that is twenty-nine by eighty feet and two stories and base- 
ment. It has a chapel with a seating capacity of one hundred and fifty, with a morgufe 
and operating room in the basement, and in connection with the business he maintains 
two private cars. 

In 1902 Mr. Lackore was married to Miss Helen Nichols, of Morgan Park, a 
daughter of David and Maria Nichols. Fraternally he is connected with Tracy 
Lodge, No. 510, A. F. & A. M., also with the Royal League, the Royal Arcanum 
and the Modern Woodmen of America. His political allegiance is given to the 
republican party and he is an active worker in its local ranks, believing firmly in 
party principles and doing everything possible to advance the success of the organiza- 
tion. He stands stanchly for those things which have to do with civic virtue and 
civic pride and as the years have gone by he has aided largely in many activities 
which have had to do with the upbuilding of the city. Along the line of his chosen 
profession he is connected with the Chicago L^ndertakers Association. His has been 
a busy and useful life and his genuine worth is recognized by all with whom he has 
come in contact, for as the years have passed the circle of his friends has constantly 
increased. 



FERNANDO JONES. 



The days of chivalry and knighthood in Europe cannot furnish more interesting 
or romantic tales than our own western history. Into the unexplored west went 
brave men who even disregarded the possibility of encounters with hostile savages 
in order that they might profit by the rich natural resources offered by the country 
and aid in founding the western empire. A life remote from the older civilization 
of the east often meant sacrifices and hardships and at all events meant deprivation 
of those things which in the older sections of the country were regarded as indis- 
pensable comforts. Chicago, the city marvelous, whose growth deserves to be men- 
tioned with the seven wonders of the world, was for seventy-five years the home of 
him whose name introduces this revicAV. No name is spoken of with a feeling of 
greater veneration and respect than that of Fernando Jones. Were it not for the 
unmistakable proofs of history, the youth of the present generation could hardly 
believe it possible that a recent resident of Chicago had as his associates in trade 
relations here the Indians who occupied this section of the country, making Cook 
and surrounding counties their hunting-ground and place of habitation. Yet before 
the city was incorporated, when in fact it was little more than a collection of villages 
bordering the bank of the river near its outlet into the lake, Fernando Jones came 
here to reside and here he lived until his death in November, 1911, being at that 
time the oldest of all of Chicago's pioneers. A student of Chicago history cannot 
but be thrilled by his life record. He arrived here on the fifteenth anniversary of 
his birth, which occurred May 26, 1820, in Forestville, Chautauqua county. New 
York. 

His parents were William and Anna (Gregory) Jones. The father was for 
many years a prominent actor on the stage of pioneer development in Chicago. He 



264 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

was born in Massachusetts in 1789 and became a resident of Hanover, Chautauqua 
county. New York, at the age of nineteen years, there engaging in farming for five 
years and also participating in the local government. While there he married and 
in 1824' removed with his family to Buffalo, New York, where he established a 
grocer}^ store. That his fellow townsmen there placed value upon his abilities is 
indicated in the fact that he was soon active in municipal politics, held a number 
of city offices and was finally appointed collector of the court. He was also dejDuty 
superintendent of harbor construction when the work was begun there. It was 
while occupying that office that there came to his hands a map of the Great Lakes 
and his study of this awakened his interest in Chicago. He realized its advantageous 
geographical location at the foot of Lake Michigan, directly in the course of the 
great routes of overland travel toward the west. Noting the westward trend 
of emigration, he believed that the city was destined for greatness and in the 
summer of 1831 he boarded a westward bound steamer, from which he landed at 
Detroit, proceeding by stage and wagon to Ann Arbor and Kalamazoo and thence by 
skiff and horseback, as occasion necessitated, to his destination, arriving on the 1st 
of August. There was little encouraging in the prospect but his prescience foresaw 
the possibilities for development and after spending the winter in Elkhart, Indiana, 
he returned in February, 1832, and purchased two lots on South Water and Lake 
streets between Clark and Dearborn. These were eighty by one hundred and fifty 
feet each and the purchase price was two hundred dollars. 

William Jones returned to Buffalo but in the spring of 1834 again came to 
Chicago, built a store, established a hardware business and from time to time 
invested in real estate. He was the first who came to this city for the jirimary 
purpose of purchasing property with a view to later selling at an advanced figure. 
Although he lost heavily in the financial panic of 1837, he soon was again in affluent 
circumstances, the growth of the city augmenting the value of his real estate. He 
continued in the hardware business on South Water street as senior partner of the 
firm of Jones, King & Company for many years and he also laid out the William 
Jones addition to the city, whereon the home of Fernando Jones stood. He was 
also prominent in the public life and interests of Chicago in early days, serving for 
several years as one of tlie first justices of the peace and for one term as a member 
of the first board of school insjDectors, established in 1810. He was a member of 
the city council from the third ward and president of the board of education from 
1840-3, 1845-8 and 1851-2. He was a leading member of tlie volunteer fire depart- 
ment and only his fearless expression of his temperance principles kept him from 
the mayor's chair. His vote was cast with the democratic party. He stood always 
as an advocate of higlier education and his labors were of far reaching benefit in 
that field. ^Moreover, he was instrumental as member of the school board in origin- 
ating the book fund for children of poor parents and was one of the founders of the 
old Chicago University, subscribing forty thousand dollars toward its establishment. 
In recognition of his generosity and practical assistance the trustees named the 
south wing of the university Jones Hall, and one of the early school buildings of 
the city, Jones school on Harrison street, was named in his honor. He served 
on the university board of trustees until his death and for many years was president 
of its executive committee. That in his character was the leaven of deep sympathy 
and charity is indicated in the fact that he aided in founding the Chicago Orphan 
Asylum and acted as president of its board of trustees for a number of years. He 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 265 

died January 18, 1865, leaving his impress for good upon the substantial develop- 
ment and public progress of Chicago. His wife passed away February 15, 1854. 

While pursuing his early education in Buffalo, Fernando Jones was a pupil of 
Millard Fillmore, afterward president of the United States, and in Fredonia 
Academy he was a fellow student of Reuben E. Fenton, afterward governor of New 
York. While a student in Canandaigua he became a warm personal friend of 
Stephen A. Douglas, then studying law there — a friendship that was terminated 
only in the death of "the little giant." His studies were not pursued continuously, 
however, for in the meantime he had accompanied his parents to Chicago and 
assisted his father in the conduct of the hardware store from 1835 until 1837, when 
he returned to the east to complete his education. The Indians were frequent 
visitors in the embryo city and Fernando Jones soon picked up their language, 
learning to converse with both the Pottawottomies and Chippewas. Frequently his 
services as interpreter were sought and his knowledge of the Indian tongues later 
secured him a clerkship with the United States disbursing officer. He was but 
sixteen years of age when he was occupying clerkships in the United States land 
office and in the office of the Illinois and Michigan canal trustees. From his return 
to Chicago in 1839 until his retirement from business life he was associated with 
one phase or another of real-estate interests. He joined his father, who had already 
become a heavy investor in property, the son giving his attention largely to examin- 
ing of titles and furnishing abstracts. Impaired health caused him to spend several 
3'^ears in the south and also three years in Jackson, Michigan, during which time he 
engaged in literary work, editing monthly publications devoted to temperance, educa- 
tion and agriculture. These were published by Wilbur F. Storey, afterward editor 
of the Chicago Times and a lifelong friend of Mr. Jones. 

Returning to Chicago, Mr. Jones remained but a short time and then went to 
Rock Island, Illinois, his attention being given to the management of the real-estate 
interests which he had there acquired until 1853. Again he became a factor in the 
business circles of Chicago, taking up the task of completing a set of abstract books 
founded on the system of tract indexes. In this he was associated with John D. 
Brown, who on withdrawing from the business was succeeded by Robert A. Smith 
and in 1862 Alfred H. Sellers, who had for some time occupied a clerkship in the 
business, was admitted to share in the profits. In 186i he became a partner and 
the firm of Jones & Sellers operated until the great fire of 1871, when their set of 
records was one . of the three plants relied upon by experts to maintain the titles 
to real estate in Chicago. Thus ^Ir. Jones became one of the originators of the 
real-estate abstract system, which has been generally adopted throughout this coun- 
try and introduced into many foreign countries. Following the fire the three abstract 
firms of Chase Brothers, Shortall & Hoard and Jones & Sellers consolidated, the 
business being continued under the style of Handy, Simmons & Company and after 
intermediate changes became a portion of the consolidated plant of the Chicago 
Title & Trust Company. Mr. Jones at that time retired from business and yet 
his counsel and opinions were frequently sought as that of one of the highest experts 
on real-estate titles and values in the city. 

The attractive home life of Fernando Jones had its inception in his marriage, 
July 7, 1853, to Miss Jane Grahame, of Henry county, Illinois, who died in 1906. 
Their only daughter, Genevieve, became the wife of George R. Grant, a lawyer, 
and both are now deceased. Their son, Grahame, a graduate of the Chicago Law 



266 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

School, is a successful practitioner at the Chicago bar. Mr. and Mrs. Jones were 
closely associated in many activities resulting beneficially to the city and to the 
individual as factors in the community life. Mrs. Jones believed firmly in higher 
and more liberal education for women and was prominently connected with the man- 
agement of the Chicago Medical College for Women, while with associates and the 
assistance of her husband and other jDublic-spirited men she secured the adoption 
of the i^olicy that made the Chicago University a coeducational institution. After 
his retirement from business Mr. and Mrs. Jones and their children traveled largely 
abroad, the son and daughter being, educated in Florence,^ Paris, Venice, Rome and 
Mentone, their combined residence in these different cities covering eight years. 
Their sojourn abroad brought to ]\Ir. and Mrs. Jones that broad, liberal culture 
which is only gained from travel and they embraced their oi^portunity of securing 
for their own home man}^ valuable pictures and art treasures, which still adorn the 
Jones home on Prairie avenue. 

A complete account of the life work of Fernando Jones must touch upon his 
public activities, for from the beginning of his residence in Chicago, when as a 
boy he filled positions in the early public offices, he was closely associated with move- 
ments and projects which were directly beneficial to the city and especialh^ pro- 
moted its intellectual and moral progress and its charitable work. Like his father, 
he represented tlie third ward in the city council when to fill such an office was an 
honor rather than a reflection upon jDolitical integrity. He acted as supervisor of 
the town of South Chicago during the period of the Civil war and was one of the 
founders of Camp Douglas. Later he became one of the founders of the old Chicago 
University, established on the site of the camp, and his influence and efforts were a 
potent factor in the erection of the Douglas monument. He was ever deeply 
interested in the work of the Chicago Historical Society and the Chicago Pioneer 
Society and was president of the latter. His name was enrolled among the honored 
members of the Calumet and Press Clubs and from early manhood he was a gener- 
ous supporter and a loyal member of the Methodist church. His beneficent sj^irit 
sought activity in the field of charity and he served as a trustee of the Chicago 
Or2:)han Asylum and of the State Asylum for the Insane at Jacksonville. At the time 
of his death Fernando Jones was a nonagenarian and stood in the front rank of the 
columns which have advanced the civilization of the west, leading the way to the 
substantial development, progress and upbuilding of what is today the second 
American city. The story of his life and work will perhaps never be adequately 
told, yet no name stood more truly as a synonym of honor in the western metropolis 
than that of Fernando Jones. 



HIPOLIT PYTEREK. 



Hipolit Pyterek, engaged in the undertaking business, Avas born in South Chicago 
on the 2d of August, 1886, a son of Alexander and Helen Pyterek, who became 
residents of Chicago in 187-2. They were born in Posen, Germany, and were of 
Polish nativity. After coming to the new world the father engaged in the express 
business, to which he devoted the remaining years of his life, passing away on the 




HIPOLIT PYTEREK 



TilE NEW YOMK 

PUBLIC LIBHAKY 

ASTOR, LENOX ANP 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AXD ITS BUILDERS 269 

9th of July, 1910. He is still survived by his widoWj who is now sixty-five years of 
age. 

Hipolit Pyterek acquired a parochial school education, attending the Immaculate 
Conception school and also spending some time as a public school pupil. He made 
his initial step in the business world as an office boy when thirteen years of age and 
afterward secured a clerkship in a dry goods store. At a later period he turned his 
attention to the livery business, which he carried on in South Chicago, and in May, 
1912, he established an undertaking business, which he has since conducted. He 
qualified for the profession by a course of study in the Barnes School of Embalming, 
from which he was graduated, and he is thus well qualified to do all embalming Avcrk. 
He began business at Xo. 8256 South Shore drive and purchased the building there 
in 1911. He has a lot fifty by one hundred and twenty-five feet, on which are three 
buildings, all two stories in height. His store is twenty-five by one hundred and 
twenty-five feet and contains a chapel capable of seating fifty people. He has his 
own private cars for funeral use and he conducts funerals in a most systematic and 
satisfactory manner, with a sympathetic appreciation of the circumstances, while 
the work which he does in the care of the dead and in embalming shows his thorough 
understanding of the scientific processes which underlie the profession. 

In 1910 Mr. Pyterek was married to Miss Agnes Poleski, of South Chicago, and 
to them have been born three children, but Alexander, the second of the family, is 
now deceased. The two children at home are Esther and Arthur. ^Ir. Pyterek is a 
member of the Polish Roman Catholic Union and is also identified with the Catholic 
Order of Foresters, with the National Alliance and with several Polish organizations. 
His political support is given to the democratic party. He also has membership with 
the Chicago Undertakers Association and the Chicago Motor Liverymen's Associa- 
tion. Aside from his business he secures a good revenue from the rental of his 
property. He rents the corner store, which is used as a drug store, and several 
apartments and thus his annual income is materially increased. He is a devout 
communicant of St. Michael's Catholic church. 



ALVIX HOWARD CULVER. 

Alvin Howard Culver, an attorney of the Chicago bar, was born in this city, 
March 9, 1873, the son of Morton and Eugenia M. (Taylor) Culver. Among his 
ancestors were those who served in the Revolutionary war, his great-great-grand- 
father, John Breese, aiding the colonies in their struggle for independence. His 
grandson, John B. Culver, was a native of Ithaca, and took up the profession of 
surveying. He came to the middle west in 18.^1 and settled at Dutchman's Point in 
the town of Xiles, Cook county, Illinois, where he resided until he removed to 
Chicago in 1849. He was the father of ^Morton Culver, who was born in Dutch- 
man's Point and came to Chicago when but eight years of age and, wishing to 
secure an education, entered the Chicago high school, but on the call for troops by 
President Lincoln he joined the One Hundred and Thirty-fourth Illinois Volunteers 
and at the close of the war entered the X'ortlnvestern University, working his way 
through college and completing the four years' course in three years. He then took 
up the profession of teaching, serving as principal of the Jones school. Afterward ■ 

Vol. rv— 15 



270 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

he entered the Union College of Law and on his admittance to the har engaged in the 
I^ractice of law in Chicago up to the time of his death. He also operated extensively 
in real estate for many years, laying out subdivisions in GlencoC;, Evanston, Ravens- 
wood and other suburbs, and the creation and development of the town of Summer- 
dale are due to his efforts. He died February 27, 1900, at the age of fifty-eight 
years, and is survived by his widow, who is now living at Glencoe at the age of 
seventy years, the family home having been lo&ated there since 1873. Mrs. Culver 
is a daughter of John Taylor, of Broome county. New York, and her mother was a 
descendant of Israel Williams, of Revolutionary fame. To them were born eight 
children, all of whom are yet living: Harry N., an attorney of Chicago; Eugenia 
M., who is a practicing physician at Glencoe; Morton T., an attorney of Chicago; 
Alvin H., of this review; Delphia M., superintendent of the Juvenile school of 
Chicago; John R., a traveling salesman; Arthur E., who is with the Standard Oil 
Company in the Philippines ; and Roger S., a salesman in Chicago. This family 
was well represented in the Spanish-American war, Harry N. having been an officer 
in the First Illinois Regiment, while Arthur E. was a private in that regiment and 
rose to the rank of captain in the Philippines. 

In the public school of Glencoe Alvin H. Culver pursued his education, and at 
the age of thirteen years, entered the Northwestern Academy, while at the age of 
sixteen years he became a student of the Northwestern University. He was gradu- 
ated when twenty years of age, winning the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1893. 
Throughout his college days he was prominent in his class, and not only made a 
good record in scholarship but was also very active in athletics, serving as captain of 
the track team, and represented the school in intercollegiate track events. He also 
played on the football team and with the team of the Chicago Athletic Association 
and he held he pole-vaulting record for six or seven years, and also made many 
records in track work. 

Mr. Culver's choice of profession fell upon the law and in 1893 he entered the 
law department of the Northwestern University, working his way through school 
by teaching at night in 1894-5. He was graduated with the Bachelor of Law degree 
in the latter year, and soon afterward entered the office of Joseph E. Paden and 
Judge Martin M. Gridley, well known Chicago attorneys, with whom he continued 
until 1900. In 1895 he coached the Northwestern University football team, which 
under his instructions produced the best record the team ever made. 

In 1900, when the firm with whom he began practice was dissolved, Mr. Culver 
became a member of the new firm of Gridley, Culver & King, which continued until 
December 1, 1910, when the senior partner, ]\Ir. Martin M. Gridley, was elected 
a judge of the Superior Court. The two remaining partners continued in business, 
together, and have recently been joined by C. S. Andrews, under the firm name of 
Culver, Andrews & King. They engage in general practice and have been connected 
with considerable important litigation. 

Mr. Culver is recognized as a capable adviser and wise counselor and his analy- 
tical ability and sound reasoning enable him to correctly apply legal principles to 
the point in controversy. He is a member of the Chicago Bar Association, the Illi- 
nois State Bar Association and the Chicago Law Institute. 

On the 15th of August, 1907, Mr. Culver was married in Chicago to Miss Jean 
Gehan of this city, and they have two children, Alvin Sager, born June 11, 1908,. 
and Jean born August 11, 1911. Mr. Culver votes with the republican party, but is. 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 271 

not an active worker in the ranks. He holds membership with the Hamilton and 
Skokie Country Clubs, with the Royal League and Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation, and his membership relations indicate the nature of his recreation and the 
motives which govern his conduct. In the years of his work he has made continued 
progress in the law, gaining a clientele which in extent and importance is indicative 
of his high standing at the bar. He early displayed the elemental strength of his 
character in providing for his ovvti education and from that time forward in all the 
relations of life he has commanded the confidence and good-will of those with 
whom he has been associated. 



FRANK McKEON. 



Frank McKeon, deceased, was born in Ireland in ISi? and came to Chicago in 
young manhood, being about sixteen years of age at the time. He worked as coach- 
man in the employ of a Mr. Tucker and afterward turned his attention to the lumber 
business. In the early '80s he entered the undertaking business at Thirty-seventh 
and Wallace streets and there remained to the time of his death, which occurred 
more than a third of a century later, on May 10, 1917. He purchased property 
there in 1905 and was the owner thereof until he passed away. 

In 1877 Mr. McKeon was united in marriage to Miss Ellen Cornyn, a native 
of Ireland, who in her girlhood came to the United States and who met death in 
a railway accident in October, 1895. They had a family of four children, but the 
first born, Frank, died in November, 1915. The second, E. Loretta, has conducted 
the business since her father's death. She had previously studied embalming at 
Haller's School of Embalming and had practically taken charge of the business 
before her father's demise. She has both a city and state license. She is a grad- 
uate of the public schools of Chicago and of the Metropolitan Business College and 
thus by liberal education was well qualified for business responsibilities. Mary, the 
next of the family, is the wife of John Heavey, of Chicago, and has two children. 
John is a police officer of Chicago. E. Loretta, the daughter, is a member of the 
Chicago Undertakers Association and of the Chicago Motor Liverymen's Association. 

Frank McKeon, the father, was widely known. He, too, had membership in the 
Chicago Undertakers Association and was highly esteemed by representatives of the 
profession. He belonged to Leo Council of the Knights of Columbus, also had 
membership with the Catholic Order of Foresters and with the Knights and Ladies 
of Honor. He was a communicant of the Nativity Catholic church and he gave his 
I^olitical allegiance to the democratic party, of which he was a stanch advocate, but 
was never an aspirant for office. He was a well posted man and possessed a remark- 
able memory. He was very jovial and genial and was popular wherever he was 
known. His friends delighted to gather at his place of business in the evening and 
among them he was called "the school-master" because of his broad general informa- 
tion, enabling him to speak intelligently upon almost any question that was intro- 
duced. When death called him, therefore, his demise was the occasion of deep and 
widespread regret among those who had been his associates. 

Miss E. Loretta McKeon, who has become her father's successor in the business, 
belongs to the Nativity Catholic church, in the work of which she is very active and 



272 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

helpful. She also belongs to the Women's Catholic Order of Foresters and to the 
Roval Neighbors of America^ in which she is filling the position of oracle. She is 
likewise secretary of the Foresters and at one time was secretary of the Royal 
Neighbors. She is greatly interested in the work of these organizations and is a 
woman of marked efficiency, carrying forward to successful completion whatever 
she midertakes. 

Miss McKeon has never married, but following the mother instinct, she reared two 
children, one of these being her cousin, whom she brought from Ireland and whose 
mother had died. His name is Owen Brady and he is now also in the undertaking 
business. The other, an orphan whom she reared, was Marie Purtell, who is now 
Mrs. Joe McLaughlin, and she has a son, Joe, who was born May 10, 1917. 



ROBERT J. BENNETT. 



Robert J. Bennett was born at Pulaski, Oswego county, New York, February 
9, 1839. His father, Reuben J. Bennett, came of a Scotch-Irish family which settled 
in Connecticut between the years 1650 and 1660, as nearly as known. On his 
mother's side he was removed but three generations from Ireland. The mother, 
Alta (Haskins) Bennett, was a direct descendant and the sixth in line from Captain 
Miles Standish of Pilgrim fame. Vermont was her native state. These parents 
were intelligent, earnest and honest people, of the middle ranks, ready to do their 
part in the world's work and content with what they earned of worldly goods and 
honors. Any one might well be proud of such ancestry. In the winter and spring 
of 1844- they came west the second time, having settled at Roscoe near Rockford, 
Illinois, in 1836. However, as no titles to land could then be obtained, the land 
being not yet in market, they returned east. In 1844 Reuben J. Bennett again 
journeyed westward, being accompanied by his wife, three sons and two daughters. 
For a short time they lived in the light keeper's house which stood on the site of the 
"Borge office" at the south end of Rush street bridge. Soon afterward the family 
removed to Lake county, obtaining two hundred and forty acres (mostly of the 
.government) near Diamond Lake, where our subject grew in age and strength for 
sixteen years. These were years of hard work and constant industry. Schools were 
few, often held in a vacant chamber or granary before harvest time. Of such advan- 
tages Robert J. Bennett availed himself to the utmost. At the age of eight he 
began to do a man's work, caring for a span of horses, harnessing them and plowing 
two acres or harrowing ten per day, besides milking cows, feeding pigs and calves. 
His father often made the declaration: "Robert is as good as a hired man." His 
school privileges were meager. At seventeen he began to teach country schools, fol- 
lowing that profession during the wanter seasons and later in the summer also. He 
was thus identified with educational interests until twenty-four years of age, earning 
a good name among teachers of that period. His last school was at Wheeling, Cook 
county. ' 

On the 9th of April, 1862, ]\Ir. Bennett married Electa M. Hoy-t and a year 
later came to Chicago as bookkeeper and cashier for W. M. Hoyt, then a dealer in 
fruits and fancy groceries at 15 Dearborn street. Two years later, in February, 
1865, A. M. Fuller, a former pupil at Deerfield, joined ]Mr. Bennett in buying Mr. 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 273 

Hoyt's business, going into heavy groceries on a wholesale scale. They began the 
business with practically no capital but worked strenuously and untiringly and pros- 
pered in a moderate way. In the great fire on the 9th of October^ 1871;, they lost 
their entire stock of goods. Available country accounts were equal to about seventy 
per cent of their liabilities. Mr. Bennett asked for time, promising to pay in full 
— some time. Creditors said the firm could not do it and voluntarily agreed to take 
fifty per cent on the same terms asked. By 1875 they had paid one hundred cents 
on each dollar and six per cent interest for all the time creditors waited beyond the 
time named at purchase. This gave them credit far beyond that warranted by their 
means and again proved the value of a good name. On the 1st of August, 1874', 
the firms of Bennett & Fuller and W. M. Hoyt & Company united under the name 
of the latter and have occupied the building at the corner of Michigan avenue and 
River street to the present date. Mr. Bennett took the financial management of 
the business, others attending to buying and selling. Through all the years of war 
and inflation, of later contractions, of panics and fire, the company and its mem- 
bers have not failed to pay one hundred cents on the dollar. Surely the Lord has 
been good, to them and prospered them. 

Two sons, Arthur G. and William Hoyt, and one daughter, now Mrs. Maude B. 
Vail, of Dixon, Illinois, came to Mr. and Mrs. Bennett. The parents have been 
active in the work of the Congregational church. Mr. Bennett has been a directoi 
in two banks and vice president in one. He is a trustee of Wheaton College and 
also one of the trustees of the Young Men's Christian Association, being interested 
in the promotion of the Wilson avenue branch. To the interests of the Illinois Chil' 
dren's Home and Aid Society and the Chicago City Missionary Society a helping 
hand has been extended. In person Mr. Bennett is five feet nine inches in height, 
weighing about one hundred and seventy pounds. He is a gentleman of light com- 
plexion and is now white haired. His habits are simple and regular and he is a 
plain liver. He does not know the taste of beer or any kind of liquor and has never 
used tobacco, also abstaining from tea. and coffee. Through a simple life he has 
passed three score years and ten in good health and cheer, answering well the prayer 
of Hagar: "Give me neither poverty nor riches"; and illustrating this, if anything, 
that of an honest walk along the middle lines of life one need not be ashamed. 



DANIEL HUDSON BURNHAM. 

Daniel Hudson Burnham, who without invidious distinction may be termed 
Chicago's foremost architect, who was architect in chief and director of warks 
of the World's Columbian Exposition and is at the head of the Chicago Plan, an 
organized movement for the adornment of the city, is a native of Henderson, Jeffer- 
son county. New York. His natal day was September 4, 1846. His parents, Edwin 
and Elizabeth Burnham, were both natives of Vermont but were married in New 
York about 1841. One of the great-grandfathers of Daniel H. Burnham served as 
an officer in. the Revolutionary war and in the maternal line through various genera- 
tions the family was represented by clergymen. His mother was a cousin of the 
late Mark Hopkins, of California. It was about the year 1855 that Edwin Burnham 
came with his family to Chicago, where he engaged in business as a wholesale mer- 



274 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

chant until his death in 1874. His general activity contributed much to the busi- 
ness development of the citj^ and he was honored by the presidency of the old 
Merchants Exchange. 

In his boyhood days Daniel H. Burnham pursued his education in a private 
school conducted bj^ Professor Snow on the present site of The Fair, at Adams and 
State streets, and later continued his studies in the old Jones school and the Chicago 
high school. He was likewise for two years under ^Jrivate instruction at Waltham, 
Massachusetts, and for one year was the sole pupil at Bridgewater, Massachusetts, 
of Professor T. B. Hayward, previously at Harvard University. 

In the fall of 1867 Mr. Burnham returned to Chicago and spent a year and a 
half in the office of Loring & Jenney, architects. He was afterward engaged in 
mining for a year in Nevada and then again came to Chicago, spending a year and 
a half in the office of L. G. Laurean, an architect. Immediateh^ after the disastrous 
fire of October, 1871, he entered the office of Messrs. Carter, Drake & Wight and 
while there formed the acquaintance of John W. Root, with whom he entered into 
partnership in the spring of 1873. The firm of Root & Burnham was maintained 
until the death of the former in January, 1891, and since that time the business 
has been conducted under the style of D. H. Burnham & Company, of which he is 
still the active head. Investigation into the history of building operations in the 
business center of Chicago at once establishes Mr. Burnham's position as a foremost 
architect of this city. He planned and constructed The Rookery, the Masonic 
Temple, the Railway Exchange, The Temple, the Illinois Trust Bank, the Great 
Northern Hotel, the First National Bank, the Continental & Commercial National 
Bank, Marshall Field's retail store, the Field Museum and many other buildings in 
Chicago and elsewhere, including the Mills building, of San Francisco; Elliott's 
Square, at Buffalo ; Society for Savings and the First National Bank buildings of 
Cleveland; the Third and Fourth National Banks, of Cincinnati; the Land Title 
building, of Philadelphia ; the new Wanamaker stores, of Philadelphia and New 
York; the Flatiron or Fisher building, of New York; and the Union Station, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

In October, 1890, Mr. Burnham was appointed by the directory of the world's 
Columbian ExjDosition architect in chief. He made all of the drawings and contracts, 
supervised the artistic and working construction and also made the disbursements 
for the buildings, which surpassed anything heretofore attempted in the magnifi- 
cence of their designs and equipment. He had charge of and managed the exposi- 
tion from start to finish. In 1901 he was appointed chairman of the national com- 
mission for beautifying the city of Washington and also of a like commission at 
Cleveland, Ohio. He has made comjDrehensive plans for the future development 
of the cities of Manila, Bagnio. San Francisco and Chicago. In 1910 he was 
appointed by President Taft chairman of the government commission of fine arts, 
created by congress on the 17th of May. of that year. Recently he has seen the 
first decisive and tangible step toward the execution of his Chicago Plan, which 
includes the extension of its park and boulevard system and the grouping of its 
buildings into a harmonious Avhole. He was a director of the Bankers National 
Bank until its consolidation with the Commercial National Bank, and is now a 
director of the Continental & Commercial National Bank and many other companies. 

On the 20th of January. 1876, Mr. Burnham was united in marriage to ]\Iiss 
Margaret S. Sherman, daughter of J. B. Sherman, one of the prominent pioneers 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 275 

of this city. They have five children: Ethel, now the wife of A. B. Wells, of 
Southbridge, Massachusetts; Margaret, the wife of George T. Kelly, a Chicago 
lawyer ; John, president of the firm of John Burnham & Company, dealers in stocks 
and bonds in Chicago; Hubert, an architect associated with his father; and Daniel. 
Mr. Burnham has for many years been a resident of Evanston where he takes an 
active interest in local affairs. In recognition of his advancement in the science of 
his profession various degrees have been conferred upon him by the leading institu- 
tions of the country. He received the honorary degi'ee of Master of Arts from 
Harvard and from Yale on the same day, in 1893; that of Doctor of Science from 
Northwestern University, in 1895; and that of Doctor of Laws from the University 
of Illinois, in 1905. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Architects, of 
which he was president in 1894' and 1895 and is a member of the Chicago Union 
League, University, Chicago Literary, Cliff Dwellers, Caxton, Little Room, Glen 
View and Evanston Country Clubs; the Century and Lawyers Clubs, of New York; 
the Duquesne Club, of Pittsburgh ; the Pacific Union Club, of San Francisco ; and 
others. In all of his life he has been actuated by high ideals whether in profes- 
sional lines or in social relations. He has ever recognized the duties and obliga- 
tions as well as the privileges of citizenship and has given much time and thought 
to public service in his efforts to benefit, beautify and adorn the city which through- 
out the greater part of his life has been his home. 



MARTIN GLEASON. 



Among the substantial citizens that the little Emerald isle has furnished to 
the new world is Martin Gleason, who is successfully engaged in the undertaking 
business in Chicago. He was born in Ireland on the 15th of August, 1872, and is 
a son of Martin and Margaret Gleason. He remained a resident of his native 
land through the first sixteen years of his life and then determined to try his 
fortune in the new world. Accordingly he crossed the Atlantic in 1888 and made 
his way at once to the interior of the country, settling in Chicago. He was engaged 
in the wholesale liquor business until 1906, when he turned his attention to the 
undertaking business, opening his establishment at No. 3718 South Halsted street, 
where he occupies a space of twenty-six by one hundred and fifty feet. In fact 
he has two floors in this building and a chapel with a seating capacity of eighty. 
His is a well appointed establishment, in which he carries a large line of under- 
taking goods and supplies, conducting the business under his own name. 

On the 10th of June, 1887, Mr. Gleason was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
C. Crowley, a daughter of John J. and Nellie Crowley, who were early settlers 
of Chicago. The three children of this marriage are: Martin J., who is now in 
business with his father; and Nellie and Margaret, both at home. The religious 
faith of the family is that of the Catholic church and they are communicants 
of the Nativity church. Mr. Gleason is identified with the Catholic Order of 
Foresters, the Royal Arcanum, the Knights of The Maccabees, the Catholic Knights 
and Ladies of America and with Leo Council of the Knights of Columbus. His 
political endorsement is given to the democratic party, but while he keeps well 
informed on the questions and issues of the day, he does not seek office as a reward 



276 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

for party fealty. He prefers to concentrate his efforts and attention upon his 
business affairs and he is a member of the Chicago Undertakers Association and also 
of the Chicago Motor Liverymen's Association. Mr. Gleason is a self-made man 
and steadily has worked his way upward. He has never had occasion to regret 
his determination to come to the new world, for here he has found the business 
opportunities which he sought and in their utilization has made steady advance, 
being now at the head of a profitable and growing business. 



JAMES SHEDDEN. 



James Shedden is president of the firm of James Shedden & Company, building 
contractors, specializing in the construction of factories, warehouses, mercantile and 
industrial buildings and in mill, steel and reinforced concrete construction, Mr. 
Shedden comes to the new world from Scotland. He was born in Dairy, Ayrshire, 
June 13, 1863, a son of John Shedden, who was a builder and died in Scotland three 
or four years ago. The mother bore the maiden name of Jane Grey ISIcKinley and 
has also departed this life. 

James Shedden acquired a public and private school education in his native town, 
pursuing his studies until he was about seventeen years of age, when he became an 
active assistant to his father, under whom he learned the building trade and with 
whom he was connected until 1886. He then crossed the Atlantic to the new world 
as a young man of twenty-three years and made his way to Chicago but after two 
years returned to Scotland, where he was married. He then again made the voyage 
across the briny deep to New York and spent one year with the Lorrilard Refrigerat- 
ing Company. He afterward again came to Chicago subsequent to a second visit 
paid to his native country, and on again reaching this city he entered the employ of 
John Anderson & Company, general contractors, with whom he remained until 1892, 
when he started in business on his own account. In that year he entered into a part- 
nership relation with William Kirk, under the firm style of Kirk & Shedden. This 
connection was maintained for twelve years or until 1904, when the business was 
reorganized under the name of James Shedden & Company. Mr. Shedden has con- 
ducted a general contracting business through all these years and among the buildings 
which he has more recently erected are the Three Arch Club, the Madison Terminal 
building at Madison and Clinton streets, the Baker-Austin building, the Central For- 
warding building, the American theatre at Ashland avenue and Madison street, the 
Great Lakes building on Market street for the University of Chicago and others. In 
earlier years his efforts were concentrated largely upon the erection of residences 
but he now gives his attention mostly to factory, warehouse and mercantile buildings. 
He has recently completed the latest addition to the plant of the Western Electric 
Company, a building containing three hundred and sixty-five thousand square feet 
of floor space. In later years he has specialized in mill, steel and reinforced concrete 
construction and he maintains an office at No. 106 North La Salle street, from which 
point he directs his extensive building operations. 

Mr. Shedden was married in Dairy, Scotland, June 13, 1888, to Miss Mary 
Campbell, a daughter of Duncan Stevenson Campbell, of Argyle, Scotland. To them 
have been born four children : John Bruce, formerly a student of architecture in 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 277 

the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Boston and now at Camp Grant; James 
William^ who is a sergeant at Camp Grant near Rockford; Duncan Campbell, who 
died at the age of six years ; and Catherine Elizabeth, the wife of Allan Cunningham, 
of Chicago. Mr. and Mrs. Shedden make their home in Edgewater. He is a member 
of the Carpenters and Builders, also the Builders Association and the Building 
Construction Employers Association. He has become a thirty-second degree Mason 
and member of the Mystic Shrine and the nature of his interests is further indicated 
in the fact that he has a membership in the Chicago Art Institute, the Chicago Motor 
Club, is a life member of the Press Club, the British Empire Association and the 
Chicago Historical Society. In politics he is an independent republican. His reli- 
gious faith is that of the Presbyterian church and he is serving as an elder in the 
Edgewater Presbyterian church, a position which he has occupied for a quarter of a 
century. He was one of the organizers of the Eleventh Presbyterian church, which 
was established as a mission in the rear of a saloon and was known as Hope Mission. 
This was in 1886. It was organized as a church about twenty-five years ago and has 
enjoyed substantial and continuous growth since that time, Mr. Shedden taking a 
most active and helpful part in its work. He is a man of unusually fine physique and 
prepossessing appearance, dignified and courteous yet plain and sincere in manner, 
displaying attractive social qualities combined with the highest ideals of Christian 
manhood and citizenship. 



ANDREW MAGUIRE. 



One of the most attractive business houses on that beautiful thoroughfare known 
as Sheridan road is the drug store of Andrew Maguire, located at No. 6543. He 
has conducted business there since 1911 and has won a most liberal patronage. 
Mr. Maguire is a native of Ireland. He was born in 1865, a son of Daniel and 
Bridget Maguire, who came to the United States in later life. The son acquired 
a public school education in England and was a youth of sixteen years when in 
1881 he crossed the Atlantic and made his way to Philadelphia, where he served 
an apprenticeship to the drug trade there in the employ of William C. Bakes. He 
also engaged in clerking in Philadelphia for Alonzo Bobbins for a year and a half 
and then pursued a course in the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, from which 
he was graduated with the class of 1884. He afterward went to New York, where 
he remained for six months, and was with Joseph Fitzgerald at Broadway and 
Forty-first street. In 1885 he came to Chicago and engaged in clerking for Albert 
E. Ebert, with whom he continued for about three years. He was afterward with 
Dr. Wernicke and later with the firm of J. J. Smith & Company, after which 
he entered the employ of the well known drug firm of Gale & Blocki. Subsequently 
he was connected with E. L. Caron and in 1895 he embarked in business on his 
own account, purchasing a drug store at Twelfth street and Blue Island avenue, 
where he remained for eight years, or until 1903. He then opened a drug store 
at Twelfth, and Loomis streets, where he continued until 1911, when he removed 
to No. 6543 Sheridan road. Here he erected a building on a lot which he had 
purchased in 1908 and in the new building he opened a drug store which he has 
since conducted. The store has a tiled floor, is finished throughout in birch mahogany 



278 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

and is most tasteful and attractive in its appointments. He does a very large pre- 
scription business and his patronage has steadily increased, for he opened the 
first drug store in the district, and his methods have ever commended him to the 
continued and increasing patronage of the public. Besides running a retail drug 
store Mr. Maguire is also the proprietor of the well known trademarked article, 
Maguire's Irish Corn Plaster, which commands a large and growing sale in this 
part of the country. Practically every drug store in Chicago and surrounding 
towns carry it as a staple. It is sold only through the regular jobbing trade. 

On the 25th of June, 1898, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Maguire and 
Miss Theresa ^Mullins, a native of Chicago. They became the parents of eight 
children but two of the number have passed away. Edward C, eighteen years 
of age, is now studying for the priesthood. John S., who was an exceptionally 
bright boy and assisted in the store almost as a partner, died on the 3rd of July, 
1917, at the age of sixteen and a half years. Henry died at the age of six months. 
The others are: Andrew, aged thirteen; Joseph Wernicke, ten years of age; Francis 
X., aged eight; Mary Theresa, five; and Agnes D., a little maiden of three summers. 

Mr. ]\Iaguire belongs to St. Ignatius Catholic church and is identified with the 
Knights of Columbus, the Ancient Order of Hibernians, the Catholic Order of 
Foresters and the Knights of The Maccabees. In politics he maintains an inde- 
pendent course. Along the line of his chosen vocation he is identified with the 
Chicago Retail Druggists Association and the Illinois Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion. Those who know him, and he has many friends in various sections of the 
city, esteem him as a man of genuine worth and entertain for him the warmest 
regard. Coming to the new world practically emptyhanded when a youth of sixteen, 
he has steadily worked his way upward and has never had occasion to regret his 
determination to try his fortune on this side of the Atlantic. Here he found good 
opportunities and his ambition prompted his immediate utilization of these. He is 
today at the head of a profitable business that is the visible evidence of his life of 
well directed energy and thrift. 



EDWARD HORNBURG. 



Edward Hornburg has been engaged in the undertaking business in Chicago 
since 1909 and in the intervening period of nine years has secured a liberal and well 
deserved patronage. He was born on the 11th of February, 1880, in the city in 
which he makes his home, his parents being Charles and ]\Iinnie (Berndt) Horn- 
burg, both of whom were natives of Germany, whence they came to America 
in early life and were married in this city. The father was a teamster, continuing 
in the business to the time of his demise. The mother is still living. 

Edward Hornburg acquired his education in the parochial schools and in young 
manhood took up the occupation of teaming, in which he engaged until 1909, when 
he turned his attention to the imdertaking business, opening a store at Xo. 1321 
West Thirty-first street. In 1913 he removed to 1115 West Thirty-first street in 
order to secure more commodious and favorable quarters and he now occupies a 
building with one hundred and twenty-five feet frontage on Thirty-first street and 
fifty feet on Wall street. He has a two-story building, his residence being a part of 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 279 

the first floor, while above is one apartment from which he derives rental. He has a 
private car and excellent equipment for the conduct of the undertaking business. He 
belongs to both the Chicago Undertakers Association and the Chicago Motor Liv- 
erymen's Association. 

On the 13th of February, 1904, Mr. Hornburg was united in marriage to Miss 
Minnie Boske, of Chicago, and to them have been born three children: Edward, 
thirteen years of age; Arthur, aged ten; and Esther, a little maiden of two summers. 
In his political views Mr. Hornburg is independent. He belongs to the Lutheran 
church, in the work of which he takes an active and helpful interest, and he stands 
for all that has to do with general jjrogress and improvement in his community. 
He has been a lifelong resident of Chicago and for thirty-eight years has been 
an interested witness of the growth of the city and at all times has given his aid and 
cooperation as far as possible to movements for the public good. 



DIXON C. WILLIAMS. 



Dixon C. Williams, vice president of the Chicago Building & Manufacturing Com- 
pany, was born May 3, 1859, at Yellville, Arkansas. His father, Dixon C. Williams, 
Sr., was a prominent lawyer of Arkansas, where his death occurred in 1860. His 
wife, who bore the maiden name of Mattie Dillon, after losing her first husband mar- 
ried John A. Lester, of Lebanon, Tennessee, and her death occurred in 1905. 

Dixon C. Williams was only a year old at the time of his father's demise. He 
acquired his education in private schools of Lebanon and in the university at that 
place, where he took up the study of law, but a short time prior to the date upon 
which he would have graduated he left college to accept a position as bookkeeper 
and teller in the bank of Lebanon. Subsequently he was promoted to the position 
of assistant cashier and continued with the bank for sixteen years. He was also edi- 
tor of the Lebanon Register for four years. His newspaper work and coming in 
contact with the public as molder of thought and opinion in this way awakened in 
him a desire to go upon the lecture platform and to that work he devoted his time 
and attention until his health failed in 1893. He was regarded as one of the most 
entertaining, instructive and interesting lecturers of the country, but, owing to the 
failure of his health, he had to give up the profession and in 1893 became vice presi- 
dent and manager of the Chicago Building & ^Manufacturing Company, also of the 
Lake Street Manufacturing Block, while at the present time he has extended his 
interests to various industrial lines and is now president of the Chicago Nipple ]\Ianu- 
facturing Company, the Lehigh Valley Structural Steel Company of Allentown, 
Pennsylvania. It is seldom that a man of literary tastes who delights in intellectual 
research and has proven himself a success upon the lecture platform has the qualities 
essential to successful management. Mr. Williams, however, is an exception to the 
rule and in the control of important industrial and manufacturing interests has given 
indication of superior executive ability, keen discrimination and unfaltering energy. 
In various other sections of the country aside from Chicago his business interests 
have constituted an element of progress, contributing largely to the material develop- 
ment and industrial and commercial activity of other cities. He was the builder of 
the street railway at Anderson, Indiana, obtaining the franchise at the time that 



280 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

natural gas was discovered there. At one time he was president of the Monroe Gas 
Company, of Monroe, Wisconsin, also of the Beaver Dam (Wis.) Gas Comj^any and 
the Shawnee (Okla.) Gas Company. 

On the 19th of November, 1876, occurred the marriage of Dixon C. Williams 
and Miss Sallie McKnight, a daughter of Moses McKnight, a prominent lawyer of 
Lebanon, Tennessee. They have become parents of two children: J. Lester, who 
is married and has a son, J. Lester, Jr. ; and Mae Fair, the wife of Hugh M, Clop- 
ton. Both the son and daughter remain residents of Chicago. Mrs. Williams is a 
member of the Daughters of the Confederacy. Her ancestors took a prominent part 
in the Revolutionary war and the war with Mexico, while her father, Colonel 
McKnight, commanded a regiment of the Confederate troops in the Civil war. 
Mr. Williams also is descended from Revolutionary stock. General John Seldon 
Roane, a great uncle, winning his title by service in the Mexican war and was after- 
ward governor of Arkansas, and his mother was a member of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution. His membership relations are with the Southern Club, the 
Press Club and the Iroquois Club. His political allegiance is given to the demo- 
cratic party and his religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church. For many 
years he has been elder, treasurer and chairman of the official board of the Church 
of Providence on the north side. His pastime is found in study and in public 
speaking and Mr. Williams is usually to be seen where the intelligent men of the 
city are gathered in the discussion of vital questions. His interests are extremely 
broad and his research work has carried him into realms where the scientist and the 
historian are found at their best. 



THOMAS H. BLAKE. 



Thomas H. Blake is a representative of one of the old families of Chicago and has 
a wide acquaintance in the city. He was born on the 25th of September, 1879, of 
the marriage of Michael M. and Margaret T. (Monahan) Blake, the former also 
a native of Chicago, while the mother was born in Washington, D. C. The paternal 
grandfather came to Chicago at a very early period, casting in his lot with the pioneer 
settlers who laid broad and deep the foundation upon which has been built the present 
progress and prosperity of the city. Michael M. Blake was reared in Chicago, 
where he engaged in the teaming business in young manhood but in 1880 entered the 
undertaking business at No. 67 Canalport avenue. There he remained until 
December, 1890, when he removed to 712 West Thirty-first street, where he erected 
a building twenty-five by one hundred and twenty-five feet and containing a chapel 
capable of seating fifty people. He had his own limousines and service car and he 
conducted the business in a most progressive manner resultant of substantial success. 
He was called to his final rest in June, 1903, but is still survived by his widow. He was 
a member of the Chicago Undertakers Association from its organization. He also 
belonged to the Royal Arcanum, the Foresters, the National Union and the Ancient 
Order of Hibernians and his religious faith was indicated by his membership in All 
Saints Catholic church. In politics he was a democrat and served as alderman from 
the fourth ward about 1900. In his family were five sons and three daughters who 
reached maturit}^, Thomas H. being the third in order of birth. The eldest son. Dr. 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 281 

Joseph M. Blake^ was associated with his father in the undertaking business from 
boyhood and after the father's death conducted the business until 1905, when, having 
prepared for the medical profession, he entered upon active practice, in which he 
is now engaged. The other members of the family are: Mrs. John J. Corcoran, 
also a resident of Chicago; Thomas H., of this review; Mrs. F. J. Brennan, of 
Chicago; George J., who is a practicing physician of this city; Mrs. T. Maloney; 
Robert J., also a member of the medical profession in Chicago; and Bert B., who 
completes the family. 

Thomas H. Blake of this review acquired his education in parochial schools 
of Chicago and after his textbooks were put aside took up the undertaking business 
in connection with his father. When his eldest brother. Dr. Joseph M. Blake, re- 
tired from the undertaking business about 1905 it was taken over by Thomas 
H. and his brother, George J. Blake, who conducted the business together until 
about 1911, when the latter turned his attention to the practice of medicine and 
surgery, after which Thomas H. Blake conducted the business for his mother 
until 1916, when he purchased her interest and has since been sole proiDrietor. 
His establishment is one of excellent appointments, well equipped in every par- 
ticular, and he is accorded a liberal patronage. He belongs to the Chicago Under- 
takers Association and also to the Chicago Motor Liverymen's Association. 

In November, 1907, Mr. Blake was united in marriage to Miss Nellie McNeil, 
of Chicago, and to them have been born two daughters, Helen and Lucille. Mr. 
Blake belongs to the Knights of Columbus, also to the National Union, the Modern 
Woodmen of America, the Knights of The Maccabees and the Ancient Order of 
Hibernians. His religious faith is indicated by his membership in St. David's 
Catholic church. In politics he is a democrat and was a candidate for the office 
of county commissioner in 1909. He has been somewhat active as a party worker 
yet he regards the pursuits of private life as in themselves abundantly worthy 
of his best efforts and through his close application to the business in which 
he embarked as a young man he has met with substantial success and is now ac- 
corded a patronage which is bringing to him a gratifying annual income. 



WALTER CLYDE JONES. 

Walter Clyde Jones, whose work in the field of legal literature has made him 
widely known to the students of law, and who is now practicing successfully in 
Chicago and in New York, was born at Pilot Grove, Iowa, December 22, 1870, his 
parents being Jonathan and Sarah (Buffington) Jones. The father, a farmer by 
occupation and a native of Harrison county, Ohio, went with his brothers to Iowa 
in 1833 and preempted a tract of land. He laid out the town of Pilot Grove on 
his farm. He was of Quaker stock, of Welsh origin, and his parents, who later came 
to Iowa, lie buried in the old Quaker cemetery at Salem. His wife was a native 
of Washington county, Pennsylvania, and of English lineage. Both the Jones and 
Buffington families came to America during the latter part of the seventeenth cen- 
tury. The father died in 1883 at the age of sixty-eight years, but the mother still 
survives, spending a part of the time with her son, Walter C, and the remainder at 
her home in Keokuk, Iowa. In the family were six children, of whom W. C. Jones 



282 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

was the fifth in order of birth. Four of the number are still living, the others being; 
Dr. F. B. Jones, a physician of Goldfield, Colorado; Mrs. L. E. Goodell, of 
Wilbur, Nebraska; and Mrs. Jesse Moone, of Ashland, Nebraska. 

At the usual age Walter C. Jones began his education, which he pursued in the 
public grammar and high schools of Keokuk, Iowa, supplemented by an engineering 
course in the Iowa State College, where he won the degree of Mechanical Engineer 
in 1891. His preparation for the bar was made in the Chicago College of Law, of 
the Lake Forest University, which conferred upon him his LL. B. degree in 1895, 
The same year he was admitted to practice before the Illinois bar and in following 
his profession has continued in general practice, although specializing to some extent 
in patent law. He was alone from 1895 until 1897, and then until 1899 was a mem- 
ber of the firm of Luddington & Jones. In the latter year the firm became Jones & 
Addington, which later was changed to Jones, Addington, Ames & Seibold by the 
admission of the third and fourth members. They practice in both Chicago and 
New York, the office being established in the latter city several years ago. In addi- 
tion Mr. Jones has some business interests of a commercial character, being one 
of the directors and the treasurer of the Benjamin Electrical Manufacturing Com- 
pany and the vice president and a director of the Stromberg Electric Company. 

His activities have extended to the political field and he has been the representa- 
tive of the fifth district (Hyde Park) in the Illinois senate. He has occupied this 
position since 1906 and during the sessions of 1909-11 was floor leader of the 
senate. He is the author of the direct primary law and led the fight for its enact- 
ment. He is also the author of the law limiting the labor of women to ten hours 
per day. He Avas likewise a leader in the movements for civil service reform and 
enactment of rules for reformed legislative procedure. He has at different times 
been chairman of the republican steering committee and is chairman of the execu- 
tive committee which has the appointment of all select, joint and conference com- 
mittees and is chairman of the rules committee. He is also largely regarded as 
authority upon various legal points and problems and in association with his law 
partner, K. H. Addingion, became the author and editor of Jones & Addington's 
Annotated Statutes of Illinois, also of the Cyclopedia of Illinois Law and the Appel- 
late Court Reports of Illinois. He has been active in civic affairs and was a mem- 
ber of the Chicago Charter Convention which drafted the proposed charter for the 
city of Chicago in 1906-7. He was one of the organizers of the Legislative Voters 
League with which he was actively identified until elected to the senate. He belongs 
to the Franklin Institute of Philadelphia, to the American Society of Mechanical 
Engineers and is an ex-president of the Chicago Electric Association. His interests 
are diversified in their scope and it is well known that he is usually to be found 
where the intelligent men of the city are gathered. He finds social enjoyment in 
the Union League, the University, Hamilton, Quadrangle, Kenwood, Homewood, 
City and Press Clubs, all of Chicago ; in the Cosmos Club, of Washington ; and in 
the Lawyers Club, of New York; and at the same time is active and helpful in his 
cooperation of the movements instituted by the different organizations in support 
of measures and projects of public worth, value and merit. The lighter pleasures 
of his life, those which make exercise an even balance to strenuous mental effort, 
are horseback riding and golf. He is also a seasoned traveler and few points of 
interest in the United States and abroad are unknown to him. 

Mr. Jones was married, on the 3d of June, 1896, at Paulina, Iowa, to Miss 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 283 

Emma Boyd^ a daughter of William O. Boyd of that place. They now have two 
sons^ Walter Clyde and Clarence Boyd^ aged respectively eight and three years, 
and a daughter, Helen Gwendolyn, five years of age. The family reside at 5541 
Woodlawn avenue. Professional interests take Mr. Jones often to New York, where 
he is perhaps as widely known in legal circles as he is in Chicago. 



JOHN URBAN. 



From the age of sixteen years John Urban has been engaged in the undertaking 
business, which for a long period he has carried on for himself. He was born in 
Bohemia in 1863, a son of Albert and Kathrina Urban, who crossed the Atlantic 
in 1867, arriving in Chicago on the 3d of July of that year. The father was not 
long permitted to enjoy his new home, his death occurring in 1870, but his wife 
survived for many years, passing away in 1899. They had a family of five chil- 
dren, three sons and two daughters, of whom four are yet living. 

John Urban, whose name introduces this review, acquired a public school educa- 
tion and when thirteen years of age started out on his own account, since which 
time he has been dependent entirely upon his own resources. He was a youth of 
sixteen when he began working for his brother-in-law, James Seyk, who was en- 
gaged in the undertaking business at Nos. 1013-15 West Nineteenth street. Mr. 
Urban continued with his brother-in-law for about six years, during which time 
Jie became thoroughly familiar with the business in princi2:)le and detail, and then 
purchased Mr. Seyk's interest. He was joined by his brother, Albert Urban, and 
they have since been associated in the undertaking business under the firm style 
of Urban Brothers. On the l^th of October, 1902, they removed to 1125 West 
Eighteenth street, having there erected a building upon land which had been in pos- 
session of the family for forty years. The building is twenty-five by ninety-eight 
feet and three stories in height. It contains a chapel with a seating capacity for 
fifty. The firm owns a private car and has thorough equipment for the conduct of 
the business. The satisfactory manner in which they conduct funerals has led to 
their patrons speaking at all times a good word for them and thus their patronage 
hag steadily increased. 

On the 19th of January, 1881, Mr. Urban was united in marriage to Miss' 
Antonia De Vorak, a native of Bohemia, who came to Chicago with her parents 
in her childhood. The children of this marriage are as follows: Joseph, who is 
now in business with his father, wedded to Mary E. Cikanek, of Chicago, and they 
have two sons. John T., who is in business with his father, married Tillie Kosik 
and the}^ have three children, two sons and a daughter. Rose is the wife of 
Victor H. Phillip, of Chicago, and they have three children. Bessie, the youngest 
of the family, died in infancy. 

John Urban is a member of several fraternal organizations. He belongs to 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the C. A. L. A. L., the Pilsen Turners and 
the C. S. P. S. In his political views he is independent. 

Albert Urban, brother of John Urban, was married to Anna Spirka, who was 
born in Bohemia and came to Chicago at the age of sixteen years. They have four 
children: Bohumil, who is with the Eastman Kodak Company; Bessie, the wife of 



284 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

Ed Hammer^ a resident of Chicago ; Otto, who is also with the Eastman Kodak 
Company ; and Lillian, at home. 

The firm of Urban Brothers is today one of the oldest in their line in the sec- 
tion of the city in which they conduct business, and when John Urban removed to 
that section there were no street cars and but few houses in his immediate vicinity. 
He has lived to see a remarkable growth and development in the district, for he 
is now in the midst of a dense population, indicative of the rapid growth of the 
city. Practically throughout his entire life he has given his attention to the under- 
taking business and the careful management of his interests, his fair dealing and 
spirit of enterprise have been the dominant factors in the attainment of his success. 



FRANK HUGH MONTGOMERY, M. D. 

Dr. Frank Hugh Montgomery, who was "loved for his genial disposition and 
admired for liis scientific attainments" and who was ever "thoughtful and tender 
and yet was quietly courageous," was for nearly twenty-five years a resident of 
Chicago and throughout that period came to be known as an eminent representative 
of the medical profession throughout the entire country. "He was born January G, 
1862, at Fairhaven, near St. Cloud, Minnesota, a son of Albertus and Mary Louise 
Montgomery. After completing a course in the high school of St. Cloud he attended 
the University of Minnesota and then entered Rush ^Medical College, from which 
he was graduated with the class of 1888. He afterward took post-graduate work 
in the Johns Hopkins University at Baltimore, with further study and clinical 
research in the hospitals of London, Paris and Vienna. From the outset of his pro- 
fessional career, he made continuous advancement and at the time of his death was 
associate professor of dermatology in Rush Medical College and dermatologist to 
the Presbyterian, the St. Elizabeth, the St. Anthony de Padua and the Oak Park 
Hospitals. He was also an active member of the local, state and national medical 
societies and was regarded as one of the most prominent representatives of the 
country in the department of medicine in which he specialized. This naturally 
made him a most active and prominent member of the American Dermatological 
Association, of which he was three times elected secretary and once as vice presi- 
dent, editing in the former position the transactions of the association for 1900 and 
1902. He was also honored with the presidency of the Chicago Dermatological 
Society and took a most heljjful interest in all of its meetings from the date of its 
organization. Aside from the treatise on diseases of the skin which bears Dr. Mont- 
gomery's name and which has passed through several editions, he was known to 
the profession by his numerous scientific articles, each of which is characterized by 
scholarly thoroughness and by a wide knowledge of the literature of dermatology in 
all languages. Among his colleagues and his clientele Dr. Montgomery was rec- 
ognized as an acute diagnostician, a skilful pathologist and ])ractitioner and a physi- 
cian of singularly gracious personality. Besides his scientific affiliations Dr. Mont- 
gomery was a member of the University Club, the Chicago Literary Club, of which 
he was corresponding secretary during 1906-7, the Quadrangle Club and the Home- 
wood Country Club; also of the Psi Upsilon and the Nu Sigma Nu fraternities. 
Although born and reared a Congregationalist, he was a pewholder and regular 




DR. FRANK H. MONTGOMERY 



THE NEW YOIIK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOR. LENOX AND 

TILUEX FOi;NllATi..(NS 
K 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 287 

attendant at St. Paul's Episcopal church, Kenwood. He took a keen interest in 
the work of the South Park Improvement Association and acted as chairman of 
streets and alleys committee during the years 1902-4." 

Dr. Montgomery was married January 11, 1897, to Miss Caroline L. William- 
son, daughter of Mrs. Irenus Kittredge Hamilton — by a former marriage. To them 
were born three children, namely: Hamilton, born May 21, 1898; Charlotte, born 
January 24, 1901; and Mary Louise, whose birth occurred September 2, 1903. It 
was on the 1-ith of July, 1908, that Dr. Montgomery passed away. Respecting 
the manner of his death, the name of Frank Hugh Montgomery will always be 
associated in the memory of dermatologists, with that of his heroic French colleague, 
Henri Feulard, who perished in an effort to save the life of his daughter, in the con- 
flagration at the Charity Bazaar of Paris in the year 1897, for he gave his own life 
in a futile attempt to save the life of a guest of the family who had joined him 
and his son in a sailing expedition. The son was saved because he obeyed his 
father's instructions. Thus at the early age of forty-six the life work of Dr. Mont- 
gomery was finished — and yet is such a work ever finished.'* Does it not rather 
reach its fruition in the lives of those who came within the radius of his influence, and 
the radius in this instance was almost a world-wide one. He was known profes- 
sionally beyond the seas and in his own country had come to be recognized as occupy- 
ing a most eminent position in the profession. More than this the character of the 
man, unassuming in manner yet ever holding to the highest ideals, had endeared 
him to all who knew him. 

Following the death of Dr. ISIontgomery the University of Chicago Magazine 
said: "In a time when specialization too often restricts the interests of scientific 
men. Dr. Montgomery was notable for the breadth and geniality of his sympathy 
with many sides of life. He was intensely fond of music, an enthusiastic mountain 
climber, an energetic promoter of civic good, a thoughtful student of educational 
questions. His loss is deeply felt among the colleagues who respected his ability, 
and yet more deeply by the friends who knew his daily life and character." 

On the occasion of the quarterly commencement of Rush Medical College in 
a memorial address Dr. James B. Herrick said: 

"But even sober words of truth concerning him may sound extravagant, except 
to those who knew him well. For there were groujjed in him so many of the rarer 
good qualities that their mere enumeration seems almost like describing the traits 
of some ideal individual, and not those of a real man of the twentieth century. 
He was unassuming, kindly, sympathetic, patient, honorable, refined, courteous, 
pure minded, altogether lovable. He was by nature shy and retiring, even hesi- 
tating, so that on first acquaintance one might think him lacking in self-confidence 
and in the forcefulness that make for initiative and accomplishment. To a certain 
extent this was true. He was not aggressive, not one of those leaders of men who 
consciously or by the sheer impetus given by an uncontrollable force within, push 
to the front, leaving others to lag behind, or even to be jostled to one side. But 
with all his quiet exterior there was a powerful internal latent energy. There 
were depths within him known only to his intimates, depths of feeling, of purpose, 
of high resolve, that led when occasion demanded, to virile action. The responsibil- 
ities thrown upon him in the department of the college in which he taught and for 
whose success he worked so loyally were cheerfully assumed and honorably, even 
gloriously, borne. That in their twenty years of close association and of mutual 

Vol IV— 16 



288 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

labor in professional, literary and college work his chief, whom he loved and 
respected so highly, grew to lean more and more heavily upon him, is eloquent testi- 
mony to his worth as a physician and teacher as well as a reliable, strong, resource- 
ful man. That his neighbors made him an officer of the Improvement Association 
is evidence not only of their faith in him as a citizen and neighbor but of their 
knowledge that he would devote time and energy to plan for and accomplish that 
which was the best in civic life. Though quiet and peace loving, he was capable 
of righteous indignation and he took no uncertain stand in opposing what he 
regarded as wrong or injustice. So that in speaking of him as quiet, modest and 
unassuming it should not be understood as implying that he was lacking in force or in 
the power of accomplishment. He was not boisterous, but had a love of fun and a 
keen sense of humor. And then there was about him a lovable something, a sim- 
plicity and a sincerity, that made for him hosts of friends. Rarely will one find 
more spontaneous and hearty tributes to personal good qualities than have been 
uttered by those who knew him, even those who, as one expressed it, touched only 
the outer edges of his character. There was something of the knightly about him. 
He was a Sir Galahad, strong because of his purity of heart. We can almost imagine 
him as one of that fair order of the table round, that glorious company, the flower 
of men, that served as models for a mighty world. They laid their hands in those of 
their great king, Arthur, and swore: 

'To reverence the king, as if he were 
Their conscience, and their conscience as their king, 
To break the heathen, and uphold the Christ, 
To ride abroad redressing human wrongs, 
To speak no slander, no, nor listen to it, 
To honor his own word as if his God's, 
To lead sweet lives in purest chastity.' 

"If his ability as a physician and teacher are passed over with but scant words 
it is not because they were of slight worth. Far from it. He was unusually skilled 
as a diagnostician and resourceful as a therapist. As a teacher and writer he was 
clear and forcible. He was well versed in the recent literature of dermatology and 
had been for many years actively associated with Dr. Hyde in keeping the suc- 
cessive editions of their text-book on Diseases of the Skin thoroughly up to date. 
No small part of the excellent work on blastomycosis — much of it pioneer work — 
that came from the private and public clinic of Drs. Hyde, Montgomery and 
Ormsby was inspired by, or actually done, by him. He was interested in matters 
pertaining to education and was always conscientiously endeavoring to improve in 
the methods of teaching in accordance with the latest principles of pedagogy. 

"Dr. Montgomery was a specialist; he felt the unavoidable medical limitations 
that go with specialization. He spoke more than once of the regret that he felt 
that he had not at the beginning of his career had more experience in general medi- 
icine and he felt that in perfecting himself as an expert in dermatologv and closely 
allied branches he was inevitably depriving himself of the delight of breathing 
what seemed to him the freer air of the broader subjects of general medicine and 
general surgery, not realizing that the same inevitable process was going on in 
his colleagues about him, who wxre striving to perfect themselves as specialists in 
other lines and that they, too, felt that more and more knowledge of subjects out- 
side their chosen branches was a sealed book to them. His impartial criticism of 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 289 

self sometimes made him underestimate his own ability in medical matters outside 
his specialtVj, for, while a specialist, he was in no ^ense a narrow one. 

"But, as has been said, he had a broad and living sympathy with many sides 
of life that had to do with other than medical things. I may be pardoned, I trust, 
for bringing in a personal allusion. The last meeting with Dr. Montgomery that 
is impressed upon my mind is when, during the intermission in a Thomas concert 
last winter, he took a seat beside me and spoke with critical enthusiasm of the 
music just rendered and of the ability of the present conductor. These concerts 
were a thorough enjoyment to him and many times I have heard him speak with 
pleasurable anticipation of the expected treat of some particular favorite, a Bee- 
thoven or Tschaikowsky symphony, particularly the 'Pathetic' This night he 
spoke, also, of his pleasure in his summer home across the lake, of how he had just 
purchased an adjoining bit of woodland, not so much to keep out possible unde- 
sirable neighbors as to keep inviolate the native woods he so loved. It was this 
love of the beautiful in music and other forms of art, his love of nature, that 
refreshed him in mind and body after the weary monotony of the day's toil and that 
gave him a marked intellectual and moral uplift and that kept him from becoming 
narrowed. Too many of us slowly but surely drift away from intimate communion 
with pictures, music, good literature, the mountains and the sea. We acquire more 
book knowledge, more technical skill as practitioners perhaps, but we lack in broad- 
ness of view, catholicity of spirit, in polish and refinement; we become, in a word, 
narrowed. And I should dislike much to be obliged to defend the thesis that the 
physician who spends much time at his music, his literature, in the forest, or climb- 
ing the mountains, or who runs away often for a sniff of the salt air, is a worse doctor 
than he who constantly grinds at his professional work. Nay, he is — other things 
being equal — a better one. We may also well pattern after the example of our 
friend in his not shrinking his duty as a citizen, in his fighting for a clean city, 
clean physically and politically. All honor to the physician who is willing to sac- 
rifice time and energy and to subject himself to possible abuse because he feels it 
his duty to accept the call to serve his neighbors, the city, state or nation. 

"This is not the place to speak of his home life ; that is sacred. But I may 
quote the words of one who writes : 'So good a man, so wise and kind a husband 
and father, leaves more to the world than he takes away. Many times I have 
said, "What a perfect home and how blessed the children who begin life with love 
and tenderness so wisely shown." ' 

"When the lightning flash of some great sorrow illumines the obscurity of the 
life about us we see for one brief moment and with an almost supernatural keen- 
ness of vision things as they are: we look through form to reality. When the 
dreadful word of his tragic death came to me there arose before me not the image 
of the skilled practitioner, of the expert who deservedly stood so high in his chosen 
specialty, nor that of the respected teacher, but the image of Frank Montgomery, 
my classmate and my student friend, the pure-minded, trusty, honorable young 
man; and then the image of Frank Montgomery grown to manhood, with the sweet 
gentleness and the noble traits that made him the respected, high-purposed gentle- 
man. After all, that which counts is character. In our inmost hearts we know it. 
In our lives we too often forget and strive for gain, for place, for the plaudits of 
the multitude. 

"We may all profit by considering the life of Dr. Montgomery. He has left 



290 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

no illustrious name jDerpetuating some gi-eat discovery in medicine ; he was no 
genius of worldwide fame. But many a man of far greater fame than his has 
passed away without the hush of respectful silence, or the rising of the unbidden 
tear to friendly eyes such as followed when the news of Dr. Montgomery's death 
was spread abroad. The dreadful manner of his death — death by drowning — and 
the vain attempt to save the life of another seem to give an added pang to our 
sorrow. But as he taught us how to live he taught us how to die. For when the 
tragic hour had come, when the supreme test was upon him, there was no falter- 
ing, his spirit rose sublime to the occasion and he glorified himself by a hero's 
death. 'Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his 
friends.' 

" 'Tis a jirecious legacy to leave to wife, children and friends, that of a life 
that needs no apology and of a death that is its own glorification. Such a legacy 
he has left. And we of the faculty of Rush Medical College are thankful for the 
strength he added as a member of our body, but above all, for his ennobling example 
and for the sweet influence he shed about him as he moved quietly among us for 
these past twenty years." 

The following is a list of monograph and papers by Dr. Montgomery : 
1898 — "Contribution to the So-called Premycosis Stage of Mycosis Fungoides." — 

Drs. Hyde and ^Montgomery. 
1900 — "Three Cases of Blastomycetic Infection of the Skin, One of Them Pro- 
ducing a 'Tumor' of the Lower Lip." — Drs. ^lontgomery and Ricketts. 
1901 — "A Brief Rejiort of Two Hitherto Unrecorded Cases of Cutaneous Blasto- 
mycosis." — Dr. Montgomery. 
"Further Report on a Previously Recorded Case of Blastomycosis of the 
Skin; Systemic Infection with Blastomycetes ; Death; Autopsy." — Drs. 
Montgomery and Walker. 
1902 — "A Case of Cutaneous Blastomycosis Followed by Laryngeal and Systemic 

Tuberculosis; Death; Autopsy." — Dr. Montgomery. 
1903 — "The Present Status of Phototherapy." — Dr. Montgomery. 
1905 — "A Case of Pityriasis Rubra of Hebra's Type." — Drs. Montgomery and 

Bassoe. 
1906 — "White Spot Disease (Morphoea Guttata) and Lichen Planus Sclerosus et 
Atrophicus. A Clinical and Histological Study of Three Cases, with a 
Review of the Literature." — Drs. ^Montgomery and Ormsby. 
"Systemic Blastomycosis ; Its Etiological, Pathological, and Clinical Fea- 
tures, as established by a Careful Survey and Summary of Twentj'-two 
Cases (Eight of Them Unjaublished) ; the Relation of Blastomycosis and 
Coccidioloid Granuloma." — Drs. Montgomery and Ormsby. Transactions 
of the 6th International Dermatological Congress, 1907. 
"Report of a Case of Systemic Blastomycosis, Including Autopsy and Suc- 
cessful Animal Inoculations." — Dr. Montgomery. Reprinted from the 
Journal of Cutaneous Diseases, September, 1907. 
"Systemic Blastomycosis ; Its Etiologic, Pathologic, and Clinical Features 
as Established by a Critical Survey and Summarv of Twentv-two Cases, 
Seven Previously LTnpublished; The Relation of Blastomycosis to Coccidi- 
oidal Granuloma." — Drs. Montgomery and Ormsby. Reprinted from the 
Archives of Internal Medicine, August, 1908. 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 291 

"Some Common Errors in the Treatment of Infantile Eczema." — Dr. Mont- 
gomery. Reprint from The Chicago Clinic, October, 1898. 

"A Contribution to the Subject of Radiotherapy and Phototherapy in Car- 
cinoma, Tuberculosis, and Other Diseases of the Skin." — Drs. Hyde, 
Montgomery and Ormsby. Read at the 53d Annual Meeting of the Amer- 
ican Medical Association. 

"Cutaneous Blastomycosis ; A Summary of the Observations of James Nevins 
Hyde, A. M., M. D., and Frank Hugh Montgomery, M. D." — Rush Med- 
ical College, Chicago. 

Dr. Montgomery was also joint author with Dr. Hyde of the following books: 

"Treatise on Dliseases of the Skin." — Drs. Hj^de and Montgomery; Lea 
Brothers & Company, Philadelphia and New York, 1904, and three former 
editions. 

"Treatise on Syphilis and the Venereal Diseases." — Drs. Hyde and Mont- 
gomery; Lea Brothers & Company. 



FRANK J. STEPAN. 



Frank J. Stepan has been a resident of Chicago from the age of thirteen years 
but is a native son of Bohemia, his birth having there occurred on the 17th of 
December, 1884. He spent the first thirteen years of his life in his native country 
and then crossed the Atlantic to the new world, arriving in Chicago in 1897. He 
learned the cigar trade with his brother, who had a small factory, and eventually 
he purchased the business from his brother and conducted it for a time but later 
sold out and in 1906 joined the United States Army, with which he served until 
1909, when he returned to Chicago. He afterward pursued a course in the Post 
Graduate College of Embalming, completing the course by graduation in October, 
1909. Having thus qualified for the business, he opened undertaking parlors at 
No. 1633 Allport avenue in March, 1910. He remained at that location until 1913, 
when he bought out the business of Michael Firpich, who had passed away. This 
was located at No. 1654 Allport avenue, where Mr. Stepan has since remained. He 
owns a touring car and limousine car, which he uses in connection with the conduct 
of the business, and he has thorough equipment for the conduct of undertaking work 
in every particular. 

On the 27th of April, 1910, Mr. Stei^an was united in marriage to Miss Anna 
Horshy, who is also a native of Bohemia and in her girlhood days became a resident 
of Chicago, where she has since remained. To Mr. and Mrs. Stepan have been 
born three children : Frank George, who died at the age of three years ; Mildred, five 
years of age; and Evelyn, who is a little maiden of two summers. 

Mr. Stepan is identified with several fraternal organizations. He has mem- 
bership with the Knights of The Maccabees, also the Catholic Order of Foresters, 
the Bohemian Slavonian Union, the Bohemian American Union and others. Along 
business lines he has connection with the Chicago Undertakers Association and the 
Chicago Motor Liverymen's Association. His religious faith is evidenced in his 
membership in St. Procopius Catholic church. He gives evidence of his political 
belief when at the polls he casts his ballot for the men and measures of the demo- 



292 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

cratic party. He has always been glad that his lot was early cast in America and 
in the utilization of the opportunities here offered he has steadily worked his way 
• uj^ward. He early recognized the fact that industry wins and he made industry the 
beacon light of his life. Close application, indefatigable effort and the spirit of 
enterprise have gained for him the success which has rewarded his labors. 



FREDERICK M. SCHMIDT. 

Frederick M. Schmidt is the only druggist who was and still is doing business 
in the looji since 1881. Moreover, he has the distinction of being the first druggist 
to open a store on the second floor of a building not only in Chicago but in the 
United States as well. He has always specialized on prescription work and through- 
out his entire career he has held to the highest standards of the profession. A 
native of Chicago, he was born on the 6th of June, 1859, the family home being 
then situated at the corner of Clark and Van Buren streets, which at that time was 
a residential district. He pursued his education in the Jones and Haven public 
schools of Chicago and was graduated from the Chicago College of Pharmacy. 
Several times he went to Europe to study and in order to profit by travel. His initial 
experience along the drug line came in 1873, when he entered the employ of John 
W. Ehrman at No. 387 State street. He remained in that establishment for three 
years and afterward accepted a position with Victor Erich at No. 2507 Cottage 
Grove avenue. He was also employed there for three years and later he spent 
one year in the employ of Otto Peuser, while subsequently he became connected 
with E. H. Sargent as an employe in his store at No. 107 State street. On the 1st 
day of May, 1881, he opened a pharmacy on the second floor of the building at 
the northwest corner of Madison street and Fifth avenue. This was distinctly an 
office drug store and was the first pharmacy ever conducted above the ground floor. 
Success, however, attended the new undertaking notwithstanding it was a pioneer 
venture and his trade steadily grew. In 1886 he became associated with O. F. 
Fischer in the purchase of the drug store of E. H. Sargent at No. 1558 Wabash 
avenue and their interests were then conducted under the firm style of Schmidt 
& Fischer. Mr. Schmidt remained a partner in the undertaking until 1893, when 
lie sold his interest in the business to Mr. Fischer and removed his office pharmacy 
to the tenth floor of the Schiller building, where he remained for an extended period, 
when he made another removal, this time securing quarters on the sixteenth floor 
of the Mailers building at the corner of Wabash avenue and Madison street, where 
he is now located, conducting a strictly prescription pharmacy. His first estab- 
lishment was a very small one. He occupied a little room twelve by fourteen feet 
and did all of his own work. In the intervening years, however, his business has 
steadily increased and he now has one of the largest prescription trades in the 
loop district. Moreover, he has the distinction of being the only druggist who 
has been connected with the business in the loop since 1881. 

Mr. Schmidt was married in 1895 to Miss Clara Louise Rehm and they have 
become parents of two children: Frederick R., who was born in 1897; and Dorothy, 
who was born in 1902. Mr. Schmidt has always been deeply interested in those 
things which are of cultural wortli to the individual and which advance the high 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 293 

standards of city life. He belongs to the Chicago Athletic Club, also to the Chicago 
Historical Society and to the Chicago Academy of Science. He is an honored mem- 
ber of the Illinois Pharmaceutical Association, of which he served as the president 
in 1899. He also became a charter member of the Chicago Veteran Druggists As- 
sociation. He has always confined his attention to the drug trade and at one time 
owned an interest in two stores in Blue Island, Illinois, under the firm name of 
Schmidt & Menger, but afterward disposed of these. He is now president and part 
owner of the North Shore Health Resort, which is situated at Winnetka, Illinois, 
and is an institution and rest cure for nervous patients. He has a wide acquaintance 
among the druggists of the city, is honored and respected wherever known and 
most of all where best known. His ideals of life are high not only in connection 
with his profession but in other relations as well and he never deviates from a 
course which he believes to be right between himself and his fellowmen. 



ABRAM WINEGARDNER HARRIS, Sc. D., LL. D. 

To say that Dr. Abram Winegardner Harris is president of the Northwestern 
University is at once to establish his position as one of the foremost American 
educators. Born in Philadelphia on the 7th of November, 1858, he is a son of 
James Russell and Susanna (Reed) Harris, whose family included James Russell 
Harris, Jr., Mrs. Walter P. McClure and Mrs. Henry A. Lewis, all of Philadelphia. 

In his native city Dr. Harris, of this review, acquired his early education and 
prepared for college at the Friends Central School. In 1876 he entered Wesley an 
University, Connecticut, from which he was graduated A. B. in 1880. Immedi- 
ately afterward he entered upon the profession of teaching, being employed as 
instructor of mathematics in Dickinson Seminary of Williamsport, Pennsylvania, 
during the collegiate year of 1880-81. He was subsequently tutor in mathematics 
and registrar of Wesleyan University from 1881 until 1884^, after which he went 
abroad, spending a year in study in the Universities of Munich and of Berlin and 
returning to the Wesleyan University as instructor in history for the period from 
1885 until 1888. In the succeeding eighteen years he was associated with the organ- 
ization or reorganization of three institutions. His administrative abilitv was called 
into play in this connection and he demonstrated to the satisfaction of his associates 
that he possessed marked executive ability. He helped to organize the office of 
experiment stations of the United States Department of Agriculture and served as 
assistant director of that office from 1888 until 1891 and as director from 1891 
until 1893. In that connection he came into close touch with the work of the 
experiment stations in every state of the Union and his success in that great field 
of labor, which annually requires the investment of more than a million dollars, 
led in 1892 to his selection for the presidency of the Maine State College at Orono, 
which office he filled from 1893 until 1901. During the eight years that he remained 
at the head of that institution the college widened its scope and made substantial 
advance in the number of its students and of its faculty and in its income as well; 
leading to the reorganization of the school in 1896 under the name of the University 
of Maine. Thus Dr. Harris had successfully transplanted for the first time the 
western state university idea into the soil of conservative New England. After 



294 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

bringing this college to the highest rank among Maine's institutions of learnings 
he resigned the presidency in 1901 to become director of the Jacob Tome Institute 
at Port Deposit, Marjland. When he assumed charge its affairs were in confusion. 
The school had been furnished by its founder with an endowment and equipment 
of buildings unequalled in secondary educational institutions, but the plans for 
their use were as yet undefined. The situation demanded no ordinary leadershiiJ. 
In the five years of his administration Dr. Harris clearly defined the objects of 
the institution, coordinated its departments and directed the founder's gift into 
channels where it would be most useful. When he resigned in 1906 he left that 
school upon a firm foundation with the assurance of a bright future. 

On the 1st of February, 1906, Dr. Harris was elected president of North- 
western University by its board of trustees, and at the opening of the school year 
in the following September took charge. Since that time he has given his undi- 
vided attention to the upbuilding of this institution, which has always maintained a 
high standard but which has reached an even higher rank under the wise leader- 
ship and practical management of Dr. Harris. Possessed of wonderful energy 
and endowed with an unusual capacity for work, the scope and extent of what 
he has accomplished during the five years of his administration are difficult to 
estimate. During the past three years the enrollment has increased from four 
thousand to five thousand and gifts amounting to six hmidred thousand dollars 
have been received; a school of commerce has been organized with an enrollment 
of over five hundred and fifty pupils; a college of engineering has been estab- 
lished which is a pioneer in requiring a five year course of study for graduation; 
the courses in history, English, French, physiology and chemistry have been revised; 
a new building has been erected for a dispensary at the Medical School and at 
Evanston have been erected an engineering plant and a splendid gymnasium which 
is not surpassed anywhere in the country. A campus commission has been estab- 
lished to direct the development of the campus; a distinct advance has been inau- 
gurated in athletics ; members of the faculty are receiving honors due to their high 
professional standing. In the year 1910 five hundred and eighty pupils were 
graduated. Probably the greatest work which Dr. Harris has done for the insti- 
tution is manifest in his inspiration of loyalty and interest among its alumni. He 
has combined and affiliated the interests of the graduates of its various schools, 
and a university spirit of devotion to the alma mater has increased among alumni, 
professors and students. 

From time to time there has come to Dr. Harris substantial recognition of the 
work that he has done in the educational field. In 1883 he received the A. M. degree 
from his alma mater; in 1894 the Sc. D. from Bowdoin College; in 1900 the LL. D. 
degree from the University of New Brunswick; and in 1901 the same degree from 
the Universitv of Maine, while in 190-i his alma mater, Wesleyan University, con- 
ferred upon him the LL. D. degree. He has prepared many scientific and adminis- 
trative documents for the United States department of agriculture, has been a con- 
tributor to leading periodicals and has delivered occasional lectures before learned 
societies. He is now president of the Illinois Federation of Colleges, president 
of the Illinois Council of the National Civic Federation, president of the Methodist 
Social Union of Chicago; founder and president of the Alpha Delta Tau. an hon- 
orary scholarship society for preparatory schools. He also founded the Phi Kappa 
Phi, an honorary scholarship society, at the University of Maine. 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 295 

While his labors in the field of education have been eminently successful. Dr. 
Harris has also been a cooperant factor in connection with public interests which 
have had far-reaching effect in connection with vital questions and problems of 
the day. He is now a member of the executive board of the vice commission of 
Chicago, of the board of managers of the Freedmen's Aid Society and is chairman 
of the executive board of the Religious Association. He is an honorary vice presi- 
dent of the Chicago Peace Society, a member of the executive committee of the 
Chicago North Shore Festival Association, member of the College Presidents Associa- 
tion, the Rhodes scholarship committee of Illinois, and of various other important 
committees. He has been a member of the University Clubs in Chicago, Evanston, 
Washington, D. C, Baltimore and Boston, of the Union League Club, the Cliff 
Dwellers, and the City Club of Chicago. 

In 1888 Dr. Harris was married to Miss Clara Virginia Bainbridge, who died 
on the 3d of February, 1908, leaving a son, Abram W., Jr., now a student of 
Northwestern University. The family residence is at 1745 Chicago Avenue, Evan- 
ston. No movement of vital interest to the attractive city in which he resides 
fails to awaken his interest or receive his indorsement. He has for many years 
held prominent place among the laymen of the Methodist Episcopal church and 
twice has been a representative to the general conferences. For eleven years he 
has been a member of the board of education of the Methodist Episcopal church 
and for five years a member of the University Senate. He represented his church 
in the joint commission of 1906 which prepared a common service and common 
catechism for use in the Methodist Episcopal church and the Methodist Episcopal 
church. South. He is also identified with the Laymen's Missionary movement. 



JOHN G. KRAL. 



John G. Krai is numbered among Chicago's native sons. He was born in this 
city April 20, 1880, of the marriage of Frank and Anna Krai, both of whom were 
natives of Bohemia, Austria. They came to Chicago in the '70s and the father is 
now living retired. 

John G. Krai pursued his education in the public schools and after his textbooks 
were put aside began learning the printer's trade, at which he worked from the age 
of nine years until 1908, gaining a thorough and comprehensive knowledge of the 
business. Thinking to find better opportunities along some other line, however, he 
at length withdrew from that trade and entered into the undertaking business in 
connection with his father-in-law, John Havlic, who had established a business 
in 1887 at Eighteenth and May streets, where he remained for more than two 
decades, and in 1909 removed to No. 1021 West Nineteenth street. Mr. Krai pur- 
chased the property of John Cerny, one of the old undertakers of the neighbor- 
hood and one of the leaders in that line of business in the locality. Mr. Krai has 
a private automobile and a limousine car and he is conducting a large and sub- 
stantial business. His establishment contains a chapel with a seating capacity for 
thirty. He pursued a course in Haller's School of Embalming and has engaged in 
embalming work since that time. He belongs to the Chicago Undertakers As- 
sociation and also to the Chicago Motor Liverymen's Association. 



296 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

On the 13th of November, 1901, Mr, Krai was united in marriage to Miss 
Barbara Havlic, a daughter of John Havlic, and to them has been born a daughter, 
Helen. Both Mr. and Mrs. Krai are communicants of St. Procopius Catholic 
church and fraternally he is connected with the Knights of Columbus, which draws 
its membership only from those of Catholic faith. He is also connected with the 
Catholic Order of Foresters, the Modern Woodmen of America and other fraternal 
organizations. In politics he maintains an independent course. 

Mr. Krai speaks the Croatian, Slavic, Bohemian and German tongues, as well 
as the English, and derives his patronage from many people of those nationalities. 
He is popular in the neighborhood, having social qualities which make him a most 
congenial companion, and his circle of friends is almost coextensive with the circle 
of his acquaintance. 



GEORGE P. HOOVER. 



While the life of the successful business man has none of the spectacular 
phases of the political or military leader it is none the less vital or important in 
the community, and in fact constituted the stable element upon which the growth 
and prosperity of every community ultimately depends. Prominent among those 
who are controlling important financial interests in Chicago is George P. Hoover, 
the vice president of the Harris Trust & Savings Bank. 

He was born in Glenwood, Iowa, September 2, 1862, a son of Joseph and 
Sarah (Kuhn) Hoover, both of whom were natives of Pennsylvania, whence they 
removed to Iowa the year previous to the birth of their son George. Later they 
became residents of Galesburg, Illinois, and the father was for many years cashier 
of the First National Bank of that city, where he resided until his death, which 
occurred in 1905 when he was seventy-four years of age. His widow is still a 
resident of Galesburg. In the family were four children, the brother of our sub- 
ject being Dr. Edwin Hoover, a graduate of Rush Medical College, who died in 
1903. The two daughters of the family are unmarried and reside in Galesburg 
with their mother. 

In the public schools of Galesburg George P. Hoover acquired his early educa- 
tion, which he supplemented by a course of study in Knox College of that cit3\ 
When eighteen years of age he entered the First National Bank there and con- 
tinued as one of its employes until 1894, when he resigned his jDOsition as assistant 
cashier to accept a similar position with N. W. Harris & Company, bankers of 
Chicago. Promotion made him cashier in 1897, and in 1906 he became a member 
of the firm. The following year the Chicago business was incorporated under the 
name of the Harris Trust & Savings Bank, at which time Mr. Hoover became vice 
president, remaining still as the second executive officer. Thus step by step he 
has worked his way upward from a humble position in financial circles until he 
is now regarded as a forceful factor in connection with the moneyed interests of 
this city. The deposits of this institution, the banking department of which has 
been under his direct supervision for a number of years, have grown from less 
than one hundred thousand to approximately eighteen million dollars during this 
time. Mr. Hoover is also well known in financial circles elsewhere, being inter- 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 297 

ested in the firm of Harris, Forbes & Company, of New York, and N. W. Harris 
& Company, of Boston, which are affiliated institutions of the Harris Trust & 
Savings Bank of Chicago. He is likewise vice president of the Harris Safe Deposit 
Company of this city. He belongs to the American Bankers' Association and enjoys 
in large measure the confidence, trust and good-will of contemporaries and colleagues. 

On the 21st of October, 1886, in Galesburg, Illinois, Mr. Hoover was united 
in marriage to Miss Margaret Phillips, a daughter of William M. Phillips, of that 
city, and unto them have been born three children, Anna Ewing, Edwin Kuhn and 
Elizabeth Phillips, all at home. 

Mr. Hoover greatly enjoys a game of golf and also the social interests which 
are his through membership with the Union League and Mid-Day Clubs of 
Chicago, the University and Country Clubs of Evanston and the Exmoor Country 
Club of Highland Park. He likewise belongs to St. Luke's Episcopal church of 
Evanston and is serving on its finance committee. There have been no spectacular 
phases in his life record but only that persistent energy and ready adaptability 
which, coupled with unassailable business integrity, always spells success. 



ORRIN N. CARTER. 



Orrin N. Carter, formerly county judge of Cook county and now a supreme 
court justice of Illinois, has left and is leaving his impress upon the Illinois judi- 
ciary in a manner which reflects credit and honor on the legal profession. Unbiased 
by personal opinion in the discharge of his professional duties and standing ever 
as a stalwart conservator of right and justice, he has won the esteem and confi- 
dence of those who desire an upright administration of the law. 

He was born in Jefferson county. New York, January 22, 1854. His father, 
Benajah Carter, who sailed on the Great Lakes, died when Orrin was less than two 
years of age. His mother, whose maiden name was Isabel Cole, afterward married 
James W. Francisco and in the fall of 1864 the family moved westward, locating in 
Du Page county, Illinois. The future jurist had already begun his education in the 
district schools of the Empire state, further continuing his studies in his adopted 
state. As the financial resources of the family were not sufficient to provide him with 
the higher education which he desired, he worked his own way through Wheaton Col- 
lege at Wheaton, Illinois, and was graduated with the A.B. degree in 1877. He 
studied law in Chicago, with Judge M. F. Tuley and General I. N. Stiles as his 
preceptors. His first professional service was in the field of teaching and he also 
served as county superintendent of schools in Grundy county, Illinois, from 1880 
until 1882. He regarded this, however, only as the initial step to other profes- 
sional work and, resigning his position in the latter year, concentrated his energies 
upon the practice of law. 

While residing in Grundy county, Judge Carter was married in Morris, Illinois, 
on the 1st of August, 1881, to Miss Nettie J. Steven. They have two children, 
Allan J. and Ruth G. 

Having been admitted to the bar in 1880, Judge Carter practiced at Morris 
for about eight years, having as partners at different times A. L. Doud, who went 
west for his health and is a leading attorney of Denver; Judge R. M. Wing, a 



298 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

prominent lawyer in Chicago; and Judge S. C. Stough, who remained in ^lorris 
and is now circuit judge. While in Morris Judge Carter served as states attorney 
for Grundy county, from 1883 until 1888, conducting on behalf of the state some 
important criminal trials, notably the prosecution of Henry Schwartz and Newton 
Watt for the murder of Kellogg Nichols, an express messenger, while on duty in 
his car on the Rock Island Railroad. The case aroused much public interest at the 
time. Both men were convicted and sentenced to life imprisonment in the peni- 
tentiary. 

Judge Carter's active connection w'ith the Chicago bar dated from 1888, the 
reputation which he had won in the interior of the state proving the foundation 
upon which he built his success in this city. His ability, too, was soon made mani- 
fest in his work in the courts here. From 1892 until 1894 he was engaged as gen- 
eral attorney for the sanitary district of Chicago. In the latter year he was elected 
county judge of Cook county, to which office he was twice reelected, the last time 
without opposition, serving over eleven years and resigning in 1906 to take the 
position he holds at present. As a suiDreme court justice he is now unconsciously 
writing for himself on public opinion the verdict of his long work as an able judge, 
of comprehensive understanding of the law, his clear analysis of every case enabling 
him to arrive at its salient points in connection with the principles of jurisprudence 
bearing thereon. 

Judge Carter resides with his family at Evanston. He is an active member of 
the Union League Club, the Congregational Club and the Hamilton Club, and takes 
a deep interest in the discussion of the political, social and municipal problems that 
are frequently a matter of earnest thought and able debate in these organizations. 



JOHN C. KRUSE. 



'John C. Kruse has been engaged in the undertaking business in Chicago since 
1907. He was born in Hobart, Indiana, on the lith of March, 1884, and is a son 
of William and Minnie (Meyer) Kruse, the former a native of Germany, while the 
latter was born in Indiana. The father came to the United States when a lad of 
seven years and has since resided on this side of the Atlantic. He is now living 
retired in Hobart, having put aside all business cares. 

John C. Kruse, spending his youthful days under the parental roof, pursued 
his education in the public schools and after his textbooks were put aside began 
learning the butcher's trade, which he followed in Hobart and afterward in Chicago, 
feeling that he would find a broader field of labor in this city. In November, 1907, 
he entered the imdertaking business at No. 2130 West Twenty-first street and still 
owns his establishment there. He opened another place of business at No. 816 
West Nineteenth street and conducted it as a livery business for three years but 
now uses the place as an automobile livery and is the owner of two limousine cars. 
He has a well appointed undertaking establishment and is conducting a growing and 
profitable business. 

Mr. Kruse was united in marriage on the 6th of November, 1907, to Miss Ida 
Diedrich, of Chicago, and they have one child, Arvilla. The religious faith of 
the parents is that of the Lutheran church, to which they loyally adhere, and in 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 299 

his political views Mr. Kruse is a republican, giving earnest and stalwart support 
to the jDarty j^et he is without ambition for office. He feels that his full time and 
attention are needed in connection with his business and his fair dealing and reliabil- 
ity have won for him a growing patronage as the years have gone by. He belongs 
to the Chicago Undertakers Association and also to the Chicago Motor Liverymen's 
Association. 



CHARLES CLARENCE POOLE. 

The Poole family is distinctively American in both lineal and collateral lines since 
John Poole came from England in 1632 and established his home at Reading, Mas- 
sachusetts. Among the distinguished ancestors, to whom the present generation point 
with i^ride, were the early colonial Governors Dudley and Bradstreet, who presided 
over the interests of Massachusetts ere the establishment of American independence. 
Another of the ancestors in the maternal line was Manasseh Cutler, who served as 
a chaplain in the colonial army during the Revolutionary war. He afterward became 
a member of the commission which obtained on behalf of the soldiers of that war 
the lands in Ohio on which was founded the town of Marietta, and was a leading 
agent in the passage of the ordinance of 1787, into which he incorporated the anti- 
slavery provision. He afterward rejaresented Massachusetts in congress and died 
in Hamilton, that state, in 1823, having left the impress of his individuality upon 
many events which constitute important chapters in the history of the state and 
nation. Charles H. Poole was born in Salem, Massachusetts, in 1825, and while 
receiving his education at West Point, became a civil engineer and passed his entire 
life in the service of the United States government. His duties called him much of 
the time to Washington, D. C, where he passed away in the year 1880. His wife 
bore the maiden name of !Mary A. Daniels and they were residents of Benicia, Cali- 
fornia, at the time of the birth of Charles Clarence Poole on the 27th of Novem- 
ber, 1856. 

The youthful days of C. C. Poole, however, were largely spent in the nation's 
capital, to which his father had been called in professional service. He, therefore, 
attended the public schools of that city and under private instruction completed a 
course in civil engineering, whereby he was qualified to take a position as civil engi- 
neer and topograjahical draftsman in connection with surveys under the war depart- 
ment when but eighteen years of age. To that work he devoted his attention in 
1874 and 1875, and later was emjjloA^ed in the topographical division of the post 
office department. This line of work, however, he regarded merely as an initial step, 
having determined upon the practice of law as a life work. His preparation for the 
bar was made through private study and also as a student in the Columbian, now the 
George Washington, University. Even at that day he was greatly interested in sub- 
jects allied to patent law and his essay on trade-marks won him a prize at the time 
of his graduation in the class of 1882. The same year he was admitted to the bar 
and located for practice in Chicago, where he has since remained. No dreary novi- 
tiate awaited him and yet advancement at the bar is proverbially slow. However, 
he soon gave proof of his ability, and his constantly developing powers have long 
kept him in a position of leadership among the patent lawyers of the country. Hav- 



300 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

ing a natural aptitude for mechanical subjects^ he preferred to concentrate his 
energies upon this department of the law, which all the time is growing more and 
more involved through the complexity of business interests, when a lack of knowledge 
or unscrupulous princijales are continuously bringing about litigation in the courts 
concerning the validity of patents, copyrights and trade-marks. The patent lawyer 
must possess not onl}^ a knowledge of the law as it appears from the statutes, but 
must also have practical understanding of mechanical engineering and of the many 
subjects which find classification along manufacturing and industrial lines, that he 
may intelligently present the matters in his charge to the patent office and the courts. 
Lacking in none of the requisites of the successful patent lawyer, Mr. Poole has made 
continuous progress in his especial field. In 1885 he became the senior partner of 
the firm of Poole & Brown and has since been continuously associated with Colonel 
Taj^lor E. Brown, of the Illinois National Guard, the firm being recognized as one 
of the strongest patent law firms in the LTnited States. In 1891 Mr. Poole was 
admitted to practice before the United States supreme court. He has been honored 
with the presidency of the Chicago Patent Law Association, which indicates clearly 
his standing among those who are his colleagues and associates in this field. 

Mr. Poole's club relations are with the Union League Club. He has been greatly 
interested in the Masonic order, and is a past commander of Evanston Commandery, 
Knights Templar, and also a member of Medinah Temple of the Mystic Shrine. Mr. 
Poole has always been an enthusiast in field sports and he is an expert fisherman 
with rod and reel. 

Mr. Poole maintains his residence at Evanston, where the family is well known 
in the social circles of that attractive suburb. He was married in January in 1884 
to Miss Anne Poole, a daughter of the late Dr. William F. Poole, at one time libra- 
rian of the Newberry Library and the author of Poole's Index to Periodical Liter- 
ature. Her mother bore the maiden name of Frances Gleason. Mrs. C. Clarence 
Poole is a native of Melrose, Massachusetts. The family numbers two sons and two 
daughters, Frances, Charles H., Clarence Frederick and Dorothy. A man of well 
balanced capacities and powers, capable of taking an impartial view of any question 
and of discriminating between the essential and the non-essential, his strongly marked 
characteristics have been the salient features in a commendable and notable success. 
Fortunate in possessing ability and character that inspired confidence in others, 
the simple weight of his character and ability has carried him into important rela- 
tions with large interests in his work in the United States patent office and the 
federal courts, where the involved questions of patent law are considered. 



HENRY ROHN. 



Henry Rohn is the senior partner in the undertaking firm of Rohn & Grahl of 
Chicago, his native city. His entire life has here been passed, his birth occurring 
in Chicago on the 29th of June, 1871, his parents being William and Lena Rohn, 
who were early settlers of this city, the father being among the first to engage in 
furniture manufacturing here. 

Henry Rohn acquired a parochial school education and after his textbooks were 
put aside he made his initial step in the business world by entering the furniture 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 301 

business, in which line he continued until 1900. He was later connected with the 
livery business. In 1902 he entered into partnership with Edward H. Grahl, es- 
tablishing the firm of Rohn & Grahl. They began business on Ashland avenue, 
near Twelfth street, and in 1903 removed to No. 1244 South Ashland avenue, where 
they erected a building twenty-five by one hundred and fifty feet and three stories 
in heiffht. Thev conducted a liverv business until 1911 but since that time have 
concentrated their attention exclusively upon the undertaking business. In February, 
1911, they opened an undertaking establishment at No. 1121 South East avenue 
in Oak Park, where they erected a building twenty-five by sixty-five feet and two 
stories in height. It contains a chapel with a seating capacity for forty. A third 
branch of the business was opened at No. 7232 West Madison street on the 20th 
of December, 1915. There a building twenty-five by seventy-five feet, one story in 
height, was rented and it contains a chapel with seating capacity for sixty. Mr. 
Grahl conducts the Ashland avenue store, while Mr. Rohn manages the Oak Park 
store, having his residence in that beautiful suburb. The firm has membership 
in the Chicago Undertakers Association and also in the Chicago Motor Liverymen's 
Association. 

On the 9th of February, 1894, Mr. Rohn was united in marriage to Miss 
Matilda Grahl, a sister of his partner. They have become the parents of three 
children: Gertrude, Loretta, who has passed away; and William, a machinist with 
the Crane Company. 

Mr. Rohn is a member of Plattdeutsche Gilde No. 25. In politics he maintains 
an independent course, voting according to the dictates of his judgment without 
regard to party ties. His religious faith is that of the Lutheran church. He has 
been a lifelong resident of Chicago and is widely known in the city both by reason 
of his long connection therewith and also owing to his prominence along the line 
of his profession. 



HENRY W. GREBE. 



Henry W. Grebe, president of the Central Asbestos & Magnesia Company, was 
born in Chicago, January 21, 1873. His father, Henry Grebe, was a native of 
Germany but was brought to America when only four years of age. At the time 
of the Civil war he responded to the country's call for troops, taking active part 
in the work of defending the Union. After the cessation of hostilities he engaged 
in the tobacco business in Chicago and in St. Louis, spending his last days in the 
former city, where he passed away in 1899. He had conducted business along that 
line in Chicago prior to the Civil war and had enlisted from this city. He married 
Anna Henecke, also a native of Germany, who died in 1914. 

Henry W. Grebe acquired his education in the public schools of Chicago and 
in a private school, in which he pursued a mechanical course. He took up insulation 
work with the Chalmers-Spence Company and later was connected with the Chicago 
Fireproof Company. At a subsequent period he was identified with the Johns-Man- 
ville Company and thus continued until he engaged in business for himself, es- 
tablishing the Central Asbestos & Magnesia Company. This was organized on the 
1st of August, 1907, his associates in the undertaking being Ernest Buehler, secre- 



302 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

tar J and treasurer, and Henry F. Greer, vice president, while Mr. Grebe became 
the president. The company manufactures and takes contracts for hot and cold 
insulation and for asbestos materials. They have had the contract work in their 
line in the Sherman Hotel, the Morrison Hotel, the Otis building, the Chicago 
Telephone Company's building, the Marshall Field & Company building, the In- 
surance Exchange, the Sears-Roebuck building, the Rothschild building, the Harris 
Trust building and a large number of the other principal buildings of the city. They 
also were awarded contracts for the Dime Savings Bank, the Whitney building, 
the Penobscot building of Detroit, the First National Bank of Omaha, Nebraska, and 
many other prominent buildings throughout the United States. They did all the 
insulation work on the new post office in Washington, D. C, and also in the Wald- 
heim building in Kansas City. One of their specialties is the lining of smokestacks, 
of which work they are practically the originators, and in this field they have 
covered the United States. Mr. Greer is the pioneer in this line, having been con- 
tinuously engaged in such work for forty-eight years, and Mr. Grebe has been 
acti%'e in this field for about thirty years and Mr. Buehler for a quarter of a 
century. They are thus all men of long experience whose training has been most 
thorough and whose equipment is unusually good, their knowledge and ability 
placing them in the foremost ranks of those who engage in the same line. 

Mr. Grebe is a member of the Building Construction Employers Association and 
also of the Pipe & Boiler Covering Employers Association. He was made a member 
of the executive board of the former and has also held office in the latter, indicating 
his high standing in industrial circles. 

On the 30th of October, 1895, Mr. Grebe was married in Chicago to Miss Lil- 
lian Ludwig, a daughter of Herman Ludwig, of this city, and they have one child, 
Ethel Charlotte, who is with them at their home at Xo. 2650 Wilson avenue. Mr. 
and Mrs. Grebe hold membersliiia in the Lutheran church and he is well known as 
a member of the Masonic lodge and chapter, also as commander of the Sons of Vet- 
erans organization, as a member of the North American Union, the National Asso- 
ciation of Steam Engineers, the Masonic Engineers and other societies. He belongs 
to the Hamilton Club. His personal qualities and characteristics as well as his 
business ability have gained him a firm hold upon the high regard, confidence and 
goodwill of his fellowmen. 



JOHN J. ENGELN. 



Since starting out as an employe of ]\L W. Schroeder, a Chicago undertaker, tlie 
interest of John J. Engeln in the business has constantly increased, and after three 
years' service in the employ of others he started in business on his own account on 
the 21st of November, 191 4, at 2504 Wentworth avenue, Avhere he is still located. 
In the intervening period, covering about four years, he has built up a business of 
substantial proportions. Chicago numbers him among her native sons. He was born 
on the 6th of January, 1885, a son of Theodore and Christina (Ferber) Engeln, the 
former a native of Germany, while the latter was born in Chicago. The father 
arrived in Chicago when a young man of twenty-one years and for an extended period 
occupied the responsible position of foreman of the Dearborn Foundry. He passed 




JOHN J. ENGELN 



THE NEW YORK 

Pi' D Lie LIBRAR 



ASTOB. LENOX AND 
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS 

R L 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 305 

away July 14, 1915, and is still survived by his widow. In their family were ten 
children, three of whom have passed away, while four daughters and three sons are 
yet living. 

John J. Engeln pursued his education in St. Anthony's parochial school and in 
the Bryant & Stratton Business College, whereby he was qualified for the specific 
duties of the business world. He started out in life as an employe of Marshall Field 
& Company, with whom he remained for two years, and later he spent nine years 
in the service of the Pennsylvania Railway Company — a fact which indicates his 
marked faithfulness and capability, for railroad service is of a most exacting nature 
and inefficiency or lack of loyalty at once produces dismissal. After leaving the 
railroad company Mr. Engeln spent four years as an employe of the American 
Asphaltum & Rubber Company and on the expiration of that period entered the 
employ of M. W. Schroeder, a well known undertaker, with whom he continued for 
two years. He became interested in the business and resolved to engage in business 
along the same line on his own account. Accordingly, as stated, he opened his 
establishment at No. 2504 Wentworth avenue on the 21st of November, 1914. Here 
he has a place of business with twenty-five feet frontage and has a chapel seating 
sixty people. He pursued a course of study in the International College of Anatomy, 
Embalming and Sanitation and was graduated therefrom on the 17th of February, 
1914. He has been a member of the Chicago Undertakers Association since entering 
the business, is a member of its executive board and is secretary of the Undertakers' 
Journal. He is also a member of the State Undertakers Association, in the work of 
which he takes an active and interested part. 

On the 3d of June, 1908, Mr. Engeln was united in marriage to Miss Rosella 
Kees, of Chicago, a daughter of John N. Kees. Their children are: Hyacinth, eight 
years of age; Marcella, aged five; and John Theodore, two and a half years of age. 
Mr. Engeln is a member of the Catholic Order of Foresters, belonging to St. Nicholas 
Court No. 20 of which he has been chief ranger for the past three years. He is also a 
member of Fort Dearborn Coimcil, No. 773, of the Knights of Columbus and is a past 
deputy grand knight of the order. He likewise belongs to Gen. George B. McClellan 
Council of the National Union and to Calumet Council, No. 78, Fraternal Aid Union. 
He is an active member of St. Anthony's Catholic church. He is also a member of 
the Mutual Aid & Benefit Society, is identified with various church societies and 
belongs to the Frohsinn Singing Society. In politics he is independent, voting for 
men and measures rather than for party. Outside of business his interest centers in 
his fraternal relations and in music, of which he is very fond. Always a resident of 
Chicago, he has steadily worked his waj' upward in its business circles and is now 
at the head of substantial interests. 



JOHN LEE MAHIN. 



With developing conditions there have usually come to the front men who have 
been able to. cope with such conditions and have shown themselves masters of the 
situation. With the growing complexity in trade circles, wherein the keenest com- 
petition is rife, advertising has become recognized as an indispensable element, 
and in this connection there has developed the advertising agency, which has shaped 

Vol. IV— 17 



306 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

and guided the work, making of it a systematic and well organized business. John 
Lee Mahin is one of the foremost factors in advertising circles not only in Chicago 
but in the country and the story of his achievement and of the development of his 
business cannot fail to prove of interest to the commercial world. 

A native of Muscatine, Iowa, he was born December 1-i, 1869, of the marriage 
of John and Anna (Lee) Mahin. The father was a native of Noblesville, Indiana,, 
born December 8, 1833. Nine years later the family removed to Iowa and when 
thirteen years of age John Mahin, Sr., began learning the printing business in the 
office of the Muscatine Journal, making such progress that he became editor of the 
paper in his nineteenth year, in 1852, rounding up an editorial career of fifty 
years on the same paper in 1902. The journal while under his management was 
first a whig paper and was afterward republican in politics. It supported the 
anti-slavery cause and the Union during the Civil war as well as the reconstruction 
policy of the republican party after the close of hostilities. The paper was also 
an advocate of temperance and prohibition and because Mr. Mahin stanchly advo- 
cated the enforcement of the state laws against the saloons, his home was destroyed 
by dynamite and the lives of himself and family were greatly imperiled. However, 
he stood fearlessly in suj^port of his honest convictions at all times and labored 
untiringly for justice, truth and progress. The Mahin family is of Scotch-Irish 
descent, their ancestry being traced back to a period antedating the Revolutionary 
war, when representatives of the name settled in Rhode Island. Subsequently a 
removal was made to North Carolina, thence to Kentucky and afterward to Ross 
county, Ohio, where the father of John Mahin was born. The mother of John 
Lee Mahin bore the maiden name of Anna Lee and was a daughter of John Bond 
Lee, a native of Harford county, Maryland. Members of the Lee family served in 
official capacities in both the Revolutionary war and the war of 1812. The grand- 
mother of Mr. Mahin in the maternal line belonged to the Branson family in Vir- 
ginia, all of whom Avere loyal members of the Society of Friends or Quakers and 
were distinguished for their earnest and effective efforts to abolish slavery. 

When he had mastered the branches of learning taught in the public schools, 
being graduated from the Muscatine high school with the class of 1886. John Lee 
Mahin entered the Wayland Academy at Beaver Dam, Wisconsin. With the com- 
pletion of his education he entered the newspaper field and in this connection 
received much of the training that proved of inestimable value in his later career in 
connection with the advertising business. A contemporary biographer has tersely and 
forcefully given an account of Mr. Mahin's business career as follows: 

"John Lee Mahin, president of the Mahin Advertising Company, of Chicago, 
is a combination of the strenuous and the thoughtful in his life and his work. He 
is one of the real thinkers in the advertising field and his method of analyzing a 
proposition and of working out a campaign by means of 'conferences' and 'data' 
was first smiled at and then adopted by others. ]Mr. Mahin was born in Musca- 
tine, Iowa, in 1869. His father owned the Muscatine Journal and Mr. jNIahin, 
when he was old enough, became city editor and subsequently was manager. In 
1891 he moved to Chicago. At first he worked in the advertising department of 
the Chicago News, then was advertising manager of The Interior and, after much 
advertising experience, in 1898, he organized the Mahin Advertising Company. 
Because of his pioneer work in linking sales development with advertising. Mr. 
Mahin is known to practically every big sales manager in the country. In his 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 307 

endeavor to resolve advertising to something approaching basic principles he wrote 
the now famous 'Mahin's Ten Tests,' by which it is claimed the practical value of 
any piece of advertising copy may be determined before it is printed. His com- 
pany publishes the 'Mahin Messenger,' a monthly magazine devoted to advertising 
ideas and problems ; also, annually it issues the Mahin Advertising Data Book, a 
remarkable array of facts and figures, issued in vest pocket edition also. Mr. Mahin 
does a great deal of public speaking. He delivered the course of lectures on adver- 
tising before the School of Commerce of Northwestern University, also at the Uni- 
versities of Chicago, Illinois, Wisconsin and Michigan. Some of these lectures have 
appeared in book form. Mr. Mahin has been one of the leaders who have done 
so much to improve and dignify the advertising agency business, in all his work 
laying special stress on the fact that 'real service' covers all parts and phases of 
advertising instead of the mere buying of space." The Mahin Advertising Com- 
pany maintains a conspicuous and most honorable position in tlie business circles 
of the city, with John Lee Mahin at its head. 

Mr. Mahin was married on the 29th of October, 1895, in the Sixth Presbyterian 
church of Chicago, to Miss Julia Graham Snitzler, a daughter of John Henry 
Snitzler, and they have become parents of three children, Margaret, Marian and 
John Lee, Jr. 

Mr. Mahin votes with the republican party and regards it the duty as well as 
the privilege of a man to exercise his right of franchise. He was reared in the 
Methodist church in Muscatine, Iowa, and now with his family attends the First 
Congregational church of Evanston. He holds membership relations with the 
Union League, the Chicago Athletic and the Mid-Day Clubs of Chicago ; the Uni- 
versity and Country Clubs of Evanston; the Glen View Golf Club; and the Aldine 
Club of New York. 



GEORGE J. BUSS. 



Throughout his entire business career George J. Buss has engaged in undertaking. 
He entered business in connection with his father in boyhood and since that time has 
devoted his attention to the work which now claims his energies and in connection 
with which he has built up a business of large and substantial proportions. He was 
born in Chicago on the 29th day of November, 1859, and has therefore been a 
resident of this city for almost six decades. His parents were John and Barbara 
(Landeck) Buss. The father, a native of Bavaria,- Germany, came to the United 
States in 1855 and made his way westward to Chicago. His wife was also a native 
of Bavaria, and arrived in Chicago in 1856. They were married in this city, where 
for many years the father was an active business man. He was the first undertaker 
west of the Chicago river. He entered the undertaking business about 1867 on 
Maxwell street, between Union and Jefferson streets, and continued at that location 
until 1893, erecting a building there for his own use. In the year indicated he 
removed to No. 1214- South Ashland boulevard, where he was in business to the 
time of his death, which occurred in 1901. He was one of the oldest undertakers 
in the city and was one of those who aided in organizing the first undertakers' asso- 



308 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

ciation of Chicago. He had for a considerable period survived his wife^, who passed 
away in 1875. Later he married Gertrude Rathemacher, who is still living. 

George J. Buss acquired his education in the parochial and public schools of 
Chicago and when still a boy entered business in connection with his father and 
has been identified with the profession since 1893. He was the builder of a 
business block twenty-eight by one hundred and fifty feet and three stories in 
height and he rents the top floor. The remainder is used as an undertaking estab- 
lishment and is splendidly equipped. Mr. Buss is a member of the Chicago Under- 
takers Association and also of the Chicago Motor Liverymen's Association. 

On the 17th of April, 1895, Mr. Buss was united in marriage to Miss Clara 
Seidel, a daughter of the Rev. Jacob and Caroline (Spannagel) Seidel, who came 
to Chicago about 1892, her father being a minister of the Evangelical Lutheran 
church. To Mr. and Mrs. Buss have been born two children: Lillv, who died in 
infancy; and Clara. 

Mr. Buss is identified with the Evangelical Lutheran church, having his member- 
ship in Immanuel church. Politically he maintains an independent course, voting 
according to the dictates of his judgment without regard to party ties. His life 
has been passed on the quiet plane of business. He has never desired to become 
an active factor in political circles but has preferred to concentrate his efforts and 
attention upon his commercial interests, and close application and indefatigable in- 
dustry have been the basic features in his growing success. 



HON. CARTER H. HARRISOX. 

Among the residents of Chicago perhaps none has come as close to the hearts 
of the great body of Chicago's citizens as did Carter H. Harrison, Sr. Born in a 
log cabin, he became the friend and associate of the most eminent and distinguished 
people of this country and was entertained by many titled people abroad. He 
stood as the official representative of this city during the great Columbian Exposi- 
tion and received with equal tact, grace and honor the official representatives of 
foreign lands or the most humble of his fellow countrymen. There was in Carter 
H. Harrison a quality which for want of a better term has been called personal 
magnetism ; he drew all men to him and a f riendsliip once gained was never sur- 
rendered because they found in him those qualities which command enduring regard. 

Some branches of the family claim that Richard A. Harrison, Cromwell's lieu- 
tenant general, who led Charles I to the block, was one of his ancestors. Others 
claim that the family descended from the cavalier governor of the colony of Vir- 
ginia. At all events, the name figured prominently in the history of that colonv 
and his great-grandfather, Carter Harrison, and his brother. Benjamin Harrison, 
one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence and the father of President 
William Henry Harrison, were residents of that state. The Harrisons early inter- 
married with the Randolphs, Carters and Cabells, three prominent Viro;inia fam- 
ilies, thus bringing about the relationship with Thomas Jefferson, John Randol))h 
and the Reeves family of Virginia and the Breckenridges of Kentuckv. 

Robert Carter Harrison, the grandfather, removed to Kentucky in 1818. He 
was a graduate of William and Mary's College, as was his son, Carter H. Harrison, 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 309 

the father of him whose name introduces this review. Carter H. Harrison, Sr., 
received from his father a large tract of land thickly grown with cane, and in the 
one-room log house which he built thereon, his son and namesake was born. Eight 
months later the father died, leaving Carter H. Harrison the onW child of his 
widowed mother, who was a daughter of Colonel William Russell of the United 
States army, a lady of character and education, whose devotion to her son was 
ever one of his most pleasant memories. She taught him reading, writing and 
geography and assisted him in his lessons after he became a pupil in the primitive 
public schools of Kentucky. She often led him to his father's grave and impressed 
upon his mind the story of his father's unassailable integrity. When fifteen years 
of age he attended a school conducted by Dr. Lewis Marshall, brother of Chief 
Justice John Marshall, and two years later became a sophomore at Yale, where 
he was graduated in 184:5 at the age of twenty. Following his return home he took 
up the study of law but, unwilling to leave his mother and go to the city to i^ractice, 
he decided to devote his attention to the management of his paternal estate, six 
miles from Lexington. In April, 1851, his mother having married a clergyman who 
had been her friend and earliest adviser, he went abroad, thoroughly touring Eng- 
land and Scotland, where he was the guest of noblemen and freely mingled with 
the plebeians. He paid a long visit at the country seat of the Earl of Ducie, from 
whom he purchased blooded cattle for his Kentucky plantation, and during his 
travels in France and Germany he acquired a familiarity with the language of the 
people that was not only of great benefit to him in his European travels but after- 
ward in his political campaigns and official intercourse at home. He visited most 
of the European continent, also Egypt, and with Bayard Taylor visited Syria and 
Asia Minor, In Taylor's volume. Land of the Saracen, he speaks in his preface of 
"my traveling companion, Mr. Carter Henry Harrison, of Clifton, Kentucky." 

In 1853 Mr. Harrison became a student in the Transylvania University Law 
School at Lexington, Kentucky, and soon after his graduation in the spring of 
1855 was admitted to the bar. In April of that year he married Sophonisba Pres- 
ton, of Henderson, that state, and they became parents of ten children but six died 
in childhood. The others, Lina, the wife of Heaton Owsley, Carter H., now for the 
fifth time mayor of Chicago, William Preston and Sophie G., are all residents of 
this city. 

While making a bridal trip through the then "northwest" Mr. Harrison was 
so impressed with Chicago and its possibilities that he decided to make this city 
his home and twelve days after his arrival invested his available capital — thirty 
thousand dollars received from the sale of his plantation — in real estate and opened 
a real-estate as well as law office, continuing in the practice of his profession and 
in the sale of his lands until 1874, when he went abroad to join his wife and chil- 
dren, the former having gone to Europe upon the advice of her physician. He 
spent the spring and summer in traveling with them through Germany, Austria, 
the Tyrol and Switzerland and after comfortably installing his family in German}^, 
the older children at school,- he returned home. In 1875 he again went to Europe 
and his travels with his family through northern Europe were terminated at Paris. 
His family .then returned to Germany and he to America. While in congress in 
September, 1876, the news of his wife's death at Gera, Germany, reached him and 
subsequently her remains were brought back to Chicago for interment. 

An observing eye and retentive memory so enabled Mr, Harrison to store his 



310 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

memory while abroad that he could thereafter call upon it again and again for fact 
or incident and this knowledge served him in good stead when he entered upon his 
political career, which, however, did not begin until he was forty-five years of age. 
In Kentucky he had voted with the whigs, had advocated emancipation and in 1860 
became a Douglas democrat, although an ardent Unionist through the war. The 
first office he ever held was that of county commissioner, to which he was elected 
on a mixed ticket called the "fireproof." His capable service and efforts in the 
interests of the majority won wide commendation and led to his nomination for 
congress in 1872. Although defeated in that year by Hon. J. D. Ward, he in turn 
defeated him in 1874. He retired from the office of county commissioner in Decem- 
ber, 1874, and in the following March took his seat as a member of the forty- 
fourth congress. Those who knew him in his later public career can scarcely realize 
that during his practice as a lawyer he experienced great diffidence and embarrass- 
ment in attempting to speak in court and when county commissioner spoke only 
when the occasion seemed to demand. His first notable public address was at a 
Philadelphia banquet in the interest of the Centennial Exposition, and he left 
congress with the reputation of being its most humorous speaker because of his 
remarks concerning a pending motion to strike out of an appropriation bill an item 
for the Marine Band. His latent gifts of oratory were seemingly called forth at 
that time and he made many speeches thereafter, including one on the repeal of 
the resumption act and on the enlargement of the Illinois and ^lichigan canal into 
a ship canal. He was always an advocate of improved waterways and while in 
congress and afterward did effective work along that line. In ]\Iarch, 1880, he 
was chairman of the executive committee of the Ottawa canal convention and pre- 
pared an address to congress on the importance of canal improvement. He was 
likewise greatly interested in bettering the highways and was elected the perma- 
nent president of the State Road Association of Illinois, his labors being, effective 
in securing legislation resulting in an appropriation for the improvement of the 
public roads. His second nomination for congress came to him ten days after he 
had sailed for Europe on account of the death of his wife. In 1878 he declined a 
renomination, expecting to return home to private life, but found on reaching Chi- 
cago that his name was being put forth by his friends in connection with the mayor- 
alty candidacy. He cared so little for it that he went to Kentucky to enjoy a short 
rest, but six days after his nomination on the 15th of March returned and on the 
1st of April was elected by a plurality of five thousand. Again he declined to 
become a candidate but was nominated by acclamation in 1881, receiving an in- 
creased majority of eight thousand. 

The following year Mr. Harrison again went to Europe and in London, in 
August, 1882, wedded Miss ^Marguerite E. Stearns, of Chicago, who at that time 
was traveling with her parents abroad. While in England he accepted the invnta- 
tion of Parnell and other national members to visit Ireland, and in Dublin was 
tendered the hospitality of the city by Lord flavor Dawson. At a banquet there 
held he made a- speech in M'hich he boldly criticised England's policy toward Ire- 
land, which awakened widespread attention throughout Europe and America, win- 
ning him the thanks of the nationalist members of parliament and the severe 
criticism of their opponents. His return to Chicago was made a matter of an 
ovation. The newspapers said that between fifty and one hundred thousand people 
gathered on the Lake Front park to welcome him September 19, 1882, and he was 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 311 

cheered by tliousands all the way from Michigan boulevard to his home on Ashland 
avenue. In the spring of 1883 he was once more nominated by acclamation for the 
position of mayor and during his third term in the office was nominated by acclama- 
tion for governor. About the same time he was also prominently mentioned in 
connection with the nomination for vice president of the United States but declined 
to be a candidate. At the state election for governor in 1884 he was defeated, but 
his jDOsition in his home city was indicated when he was chosen mayor for the fourth 
time in 1885. At its close he emphatically stated that he would not again become 
a candidate but, in defiance of his expressed wish, the party nominated him by 
acclamation, whereupon occurred such a scene as is seldom witnessed. In response 
to the demands of the people he appeared upon the platform and received a tre- 
mendous greeting. When quiet was restored so that he could be heard, he said 
that he could accept only on condition that every man in the convention should 
raise his right hand as a pledge of loyal support. Instantly every hand was raised 
and the building trembled with applause. A few days later, however, he wrote to 
the committee, peremptorily declining, and reaffirming his jjurpose to retire to 
private life. Twelve days after he had left the office of mayor his wife passed 
away and the public offices were closed, flags placed at half-mast and the city and 
county officials attended the funeral in a body — a mark of respect seldom, if ever, 
paid. 

In the summer of 1887, for needed rest, Mr. Harrison went abroad accompanied 
by his younger son, William Preston, and John W. Amberg, the son of a friend. 
He visited China, Japan, Siam, India, Ceylon, Egypt, Greece, Turkey, Roumania, 
Hungary, Austria, Russia, Finland, Sweden, Norway, Germany, France and Eng- 
land, and an account of his travels was published in a series of fifty letters to a 
Chicago newspaper and afterward appeared in book form under the title "A Race 
with the Sun," receiving favorable comment from literary critics. A series of let- 
ters concerning his trip to the Yellowstone National Park, Puget Sound, Alaska 
and the Canadian Rockies, in the summer of 1890, were published in the Chicago 
Tribune and later in book form under the title "A Summer Outing." In 1889 he 
declined the tendered nomination for the mayoralty and in 1891 contested the 
nomination with DeWitt C. Cregier. His friends always asserted that he received 
a majority of the votes in the primary elections. He afterward decided to run 
independently and on that occasion, because of the division in the party, Hempstead 
Washburne, republican, was elected. In the spring of 1893 Mr. Harrison was 
once more his party's candidate and made a brilliant canvass which was a personal 
ovation from start to finish. All of the newspapers of the city except one were 
against him but the people were with him and he received a majority of twenty-one 
thousand. It was a critical hour in the history of the city, for the mayor would be 
Chicago's official representative at the World's Fair, would receive commissioners 
and royal visitors from all nations, together with the officials of our own land. The 
public recognized that Mr. Harrison was preeminently fitted for the position. His 
linguistic powers, his broad knowledge of various lands and their peoples, his elo- 
quence and versatility, his courtliness combined with simplicity of manner, his 
boundless hospitality and his thorough familiarity' with every detail of executive 
duty, were the qualities which made him above all others the one man for the office. 
He failed in not one single instance to live up to the expectations of his fellow 
townsmen and his last public address was made at Music Hall, at the World's 



312 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

Columbian Exposition^ on what was known as All Cities' Day, October 28, 1893, 
when mayors from all over the country were the guests of Chicago. On that occa- 
sion he said, at the close of an address which held the close attention of every 
hearer: "This fair need not have a history to record it. Its beauty has gone forth 
among the people, the men, the women, aye, the child has looked upon it, and they 
have all been well rejaaid for this wonderful education. No royal king ordered it, 
but the American people, with the greatest of pluck, born under the freedom of 
those Stars and Stripes, made this thing possible — possible to a free people. It is 
an educator of the world. The world will be wiser for it. No king can ever rule 
the American heart. America extends an invitation to the best of the world, and 
its Stars and Stripes will wave from now on to eternity. That is one of the lessons 
we have taught. But I must stop. If I go on another moment I will get on to 
some new idea. I thank you all for coming to us. I welcome you all here, in the 
name of Chicago. I welcome you to see this dying effort of Chicago — Chicago that 
never could conceive what it wouldn't attempt and yet has found nothing it could 
not achieve. I thank you all." Late that afternoon he returned home to dine with 
his family and an Irour later was shot down in his own residence by one Prender- 
gast, who had been admitted to the house on the plea that he desired to see the 
mayor on important business. Chicago was plunged into gloom and the plans that 
the Exposition should go out in a blaze of glory was abandoned. It seemed that 
all Chicago gathered to pay tribute to him at the funeral obsequies and during the 
day in which the body lay in state in the city hall. A contemporary biographer has 
written: "For twenty years, covering the period of his official life. Carter Harri- 
son was a unique character in Chicago. In many respects his life was picturesque. 
That he was honest none ever questioned. That he loved Chicago as his own being, 
none ever doubted. He was a man of strong personality, little understood abroad 
because grossly caricatured at home. He w-as thoroughly familiar with the details 
of every department of the municipal government and the duties of every responsible 
head. He insisted upon honest administration. He possessed remarkable executive 
and administrative ability. He was always alert, guarding his official prerogatives 
and the public interests with sleepless vigilance. He sought to protect the treasury 
from useless appropriations. His habit of personal econom}' controlled his official 
recommendations. His character abounded in contradictions and paradoxes. A 
heavy taxpayer himself, he protected the interest of taxpayers. ^Nloved with sym- 
pathy for the destitute, he favored increasing the public work to give them em- 
jaloyment. He governed without repression. He planned his campaign as a genius 
and led the assault as a hero. He never engaged in defensive warfare, however 
vigorously the enemy attacked. He was always aggressive and impetuous. He 
carried his measures by the force of his intellect and the fury of his manner, con- 
vincing or overawing the opposition. His purpose accomplished, he was gracious 
and conciliatory. He was a manly antagonist, a magnanimous victor. No man who 
contended with him ever doubted his courage or his resources after the battle was 
over. He had no conception of fear and no apprehension of danger. He encoun- 
tered the antagonism of newspapers and secured the support of their readers. He 
was a piquant, popular, versatile public speaker, adapting his oratory with equal 
facility to the educated and the ignorant, the refined and the rough. Naturally 
genial and courteous, he could, if the occasion demanded, assume a reserve, hauteur 
and frigidity of manner that chilled advances. He was a consummate actor, an 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 313 

earnest man. Thoroughly democratic in principle and mental characteristics, he 
was equally agreeable to the laborer and the millionaire. He knew no classes ; all 
occupied one plane. The masses regarded him with unbounded affection. He was 
wonderfully felicitous in adapting himself to his surroundings. He was a man of 
sujDerb presence and chivalrous bearing. His supremest devotion was to his home 
and his family. He had little use for the club. His nature united the courage of 
a lion with the gentleness of a child." 



NICHOLAS GOETTERT. 

Nicholas Goettert, a graduate of the Chicago Post Graduate School of Embalm- 
ing of the class of 1908, has engaged in business on his own account as an under- 
taker since 1909. He has been a lifelong resident of Chicago, his birth having oc- 
curred in this city on the 9th of April, 1878. His parents, Jacob and Susan Goet- 
tert, were natives of Germany and of St. John, Indiana, respectively. The father 
came to Chicago in 1871 and was employed in various ways for a time. He be- 
came actively interested in politics and was called to a number of political offices. 
About 1894 he opened an undertaking establishment in connection with John Har- 
garten at Hoyne avenue and Twenty-second place. While he started in business in 
a small way, success attended the new undertaking and after a few months Mr. 
Goettert was enabled to purchase the interest of his partner. He afterward estab- 
lished business at No. 20 i6 West Twenty-third street, where he remained until the 
time of his retirement from active life in 1909. The last three years of his life 
were spent in the enjoyment of a rest which he had truly earned and richly merited 
and he passed away July 5, 1912, while his widow, surviving him for about four 
years, died in May, 1916. 

Nicholas Goettert whose name introduces this review spent his youthful days 
in his parents' home and during that period acquired a parochial school education. 
He started in the undertaking business with his father about the time he attained 
his majority and in order to acquire a high degree of efficiency in the work he 
pursued a course in the Chicago Post Graduate College of Embalming, where he 
completed his studies in 1908. The following year he took charge of the business 
upon his father's retiremment and has since successfully conducted it. 

On the 26th of August, 1908, Mr. Goettert was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
Balmes, of Chicago, and to them have been born four children, Peter, Edward, 
Nicholas and Cecelia. Mr. Goettert has membership in St. Paul's Roman Catholic 
church and he is identified also with the Knights of Columbus, the Catholic Order 
of Foresters, the Catholic Guards of America, the St. Paul Benevolent Society and 
the Luxemburg Brotherhood Association. He likewise has membership with the 
Fraternal Order of Eagles, while along business lines his membership relations are 
with the Chicago Undertakers Association and the Chicago Motor Liverymen's Asso- 
ciation. In politics he is inclined to follow an independent course, voting for men 
and measures rather than for party. When one analyzes the cause of success it 
is found that concentration of purpose and energy largely constitute the foundation 
upon which prosperity is built. Throughout his entire life Nicholas Goettert has 
devoted his attention to undertaking and has gained a most thorough and compre- 



314 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

hensive knowledge of even^ phase of the business and the careful, thoughtful and 
considerate manner in which he conducts funerals has won for him the gratitude 
and kindly appreciation of the many who have had need of his services. 



CARTER HENRY HARRISON, Jr. 

American annals do not furnish a parallel to the history of Carter H. Harri- 
son, Sr., and Jr., father and son, whose combined service as mayor of the city 
covers ten terms. Each after filling the position for four terms retired, as he be- 
lieved, permanently from the position of chief executive but was recalled to the 
office, and the son is now the incumbent in the high position in which popular 
franchise has placed him. 

He was born in Chicago, April 23, 1860, and attended school here until 1873, 
when he accompanied his mother abroad and continued his education in the gxva- 
nasium at Altenburg, Germany. In 1876 he was a college student in New York 
and in 1881 was graduated from St. Ignatius College of Chicago. He afterward 
entered Yale, his father's alma mater, and there completed a law course with the 
class of 1883. Following his return to Chicago he took up the real-estate business, 
in which he engaged for a number of years, proving his splendid business ability 
and executive force in his operations along that line. In 1891 he became his fa- 
ther's associate in the purchase and conduct of the Chicago Times, the son assuming 
editorial charge. In this, as in the real-estate business, he won success, his con- 
nection with the paper continuing from 1891 luitil 1894. The example of his 
ancestors — and the family records include such names as Thomas Jefferson, Wil- 
liam Henry Harrison and the Breckenridges of Kentucky — may have awakened in 
him his deep interest in politics. At all events, the same qualities which made his 
forebears distinguished ^^o^itical leaders have brought him to a prominence in 
municipal affairs not even second to that of his illustrious father. In Aj^ril, 1897, 
he was chosen mayor of the city and was elected at each biennial election until he 
had served four terms. The popularity of the Harrison family has always been 
commented upon in press notices, but behind j^ersonal popularity there is a busi- 
ness ability and executive force and a power of statescraft that has made Carter 
H. Harrison the chief executive of the city for five terms. He retired from the 
office in 1905 and for six years had no official connection with Chicago politics, al- 
though at all times an influential factor in party councils. In 1911 it was said 
that there was perhaps but one man who could make democratic success an assured 
thing and that was Carter H. Harrison. Once more he accepted the nomination 
and against several candidates was elected for a four years' term. He has the 
confidence of the j^eople at large. Political leaders and business men know him as 
a man who does not break faith, and from his many elections but one deduction can 
be gained — that the city regards his administration of public affairs as beneficial 
to the majority. 

On the 14th of December, 1887. ]\Ir. Harrison was married to ^Sliss Edith 
Ogden, daughter of Robert N. Odgen, of New Orleans, Louisiana, and to tluin have 
been born two children — a son, who is named for his father and grandfather, and 
a daughter, Edith. Mrs. Harrison is a lady of liberal culture, prominent in societv 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 315 

circles, and possesses, moreover, considerable literary ability, as is manifest in 
some charming stories for children which have come from her pen. She is also 
active in charitable work. 

Mr. Harrison holds membership with the Sons of the Revolution, the Sons of the 
American Revolution, the Society of Colonial Wars, the Society of the Cincinnati 
and the Society of the War of 1812. His Chicago club associations are with the 
University, Iroquois and the Chicago Yacht Clubs. He belongs also to the Swan 
Lake and Huron Mountain Hunting and Fishing Clubs, which indicate something 
of the nature of the recreation and pleasures in which he indulges when leisure 
permits. The promise of his yomig manhood has been verified as he has come to 
middle life. His powers and abilities have ripened and matured and his judgment 
shows the benefits gained from past experience. He is making steady and effect- 
ive effort to i^romote Chicago's welfare without any of the disturbing influences 
which result from revolutionary reforms and movements for which the majority 
are unfitted. 



HARRY J. THORMAN. 



Harry J. Thorman, who since March, 1912, has conducted an undertaking 
business at No. 3163 Ogden avenue, was born in Chicago on the 2.'5th of June, 1883, 
of the marriage of Jacob and Anna Thorman, both natives of Germany. They 
crossed the Atlantic in 1873 and made their way to Chicago, where the father be- 
came connected with the Temple Manufacturing Company. He is now, however, 
living retired in the enjoyment of well earned rest. 

Harry J. Thorman attended the jjublic schools and later pursued a business 
course at the Yoiuig Men's Christian Association. He started in business life in 
connection' with the Temple Pump Company, with which he remained for fourteen 
years in the capacity of shijiper and buyer. His initial step in the direction of 
the trade in which he is now engaged was made as salesman with the Haller Com- 
pany, manufacturers of embalming fluid. Through the steps of an orderly progres- 
sion he has reached his present position in business circles. He became the secre- 
tary of the Post Graduate College of Embalming and in that connection also did 
embalming for the trade. In 1909 he embarked in the undertaking business on his 
own account, opening a store at Sixteenth street and Central Park avenue. In 
March, 1912, he bought out the business of William Yuers at No. 3163 Ogden 
avenue and has been at this location continuously since. He has a well appointed 
establishment here containing a chapel with a seating capacity for one hundred. 
He carries a large line of undertakers' supplies and has every equipment for 
the care of the dead. He also maintains two touring cars and a limousine car 
to be used for funeral services. Everything that he does is performed in a most 
orderly, systematic and scientific way and his ready tact and kindliness consti- 
tute important features in his success in this business.. 

On the 4th of June, 1913, Mr. Thorman was united in marriage to Miss 
Adolphine Levermann, of Oak Park, and to them have been born two children. 
Iris and Harry. Mr. Thorman is identified with a number of fraternal organiza- 
tions. He belongs to the Royal League, the Royal Arcanum, the Columbian 



o 



16 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 



KnightS;, the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the Knights of Columbus, and the Catho- 
lic Order of Foresters. His religious faith is indicated in the fact that he is a 
communicant of St. Mary's Catholic church. Along his line of business he is 
identified with the Chicago Motor Liverj^men's Association, the Chicago Undertakers 
Association and the Illinois Undertakers Association. 



ALEXANDER MacLEAN. 

Alexander MacLean is numbered among the alert, progressive and enterprising 
business men of Chicago, being today at the head of the MacLean Drug Company, 
which is ojDerating a chain of nine stores in the city. Mr. MacLean is of Canadian 
birth. He was born in 1875 and in his native country pursued a public and high 
school education. He served an apprenticeship to the drug trade in Chesley, Ontario, 
and then in order to further equip himself for the profession he became a student 
in the Ontario College of Pharmacy, from which he was graduated with the class of 
1898. The same year he determined to try his fortune in Chicago and made his 
way to this city, where he secured a clerkship, being thus employed until 1903. He 
then felt that his experience as well as his capital justified him in embarking in busi- 
ness on his own account and he opened a store at Sixty-ninth street and Normal 
avenue which he conducted for a year and then sold. He was afterward manager 
with the well known drug firm of Dale & Sempill at the corner of Clark and Madison 
streets, continuing in that connection for a year. He next opened a store for himself 
at Forty-seventh street and Calumet avenue, where he remained in business for a year, 
and later he was manager for the Central Drug Company in its establishment at 
State and Washington streets for a year. In 1909 he became the organizer of the 
MacLean Drug Company, operating the Central Drug Stores. The first establish- 
ment of this corporation was located at No. -iSil Broadway. Another store was 
opened at No. 3100 Law-rence avenue in 1911 and a third at Sheridan Road and Wil- 
son avenue in 1913. The trade was further expanded by the establishment of another 
store at Sheridan Road and Irving Park boulevard in 1914 and in the same year 
another store was opened at the corner of Lincoln and Belmont avenues. Further in- 
crease in the business was indicated in the opening of a store in 1917 at the corner of 
Chicago and Central avenues; a store at the corner of Central avenue and South 
boulevard; and a store at the corner of Howard avenue and Bosworth street. In 
1918 a large store was opened at Sunnyside and Broadway and the old Broadway 
establishment was removed to Broadway and Wilson avenue. All these stores have 
been remodeled and fitted out in the most up-to-date manner. They have tiled floors 
and mahogany fixtures and the equipment presents a most pleasing and attractive 
appearance. There are nine stores in all, showing the substantial and steady growth 
of the business which is the direct outcome of the keen discernment, executive force and 
administrative control of Mr. MacLean. In 1917 a wholesale house for his own 
stores was opened at No. 730 North Franklin street, where the whole top floor of 
the building is utilized, containing thirteen hundred square feet. The company also 
has its own candy factory, its own laboratory and puts up all of its own j^ackage 
goods. It has a central advertising department for the various stores and a window 
trimming department. The buying is all done through the company and employ- 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 317 

ment is furnished to one hundred and fifty people. The establishments of the firm 
are known as among the highest class stores in their respective neighborhoods. The 
company started as a ten thousand dollar corporation and in 191 i the capital stock 
was increased to one hundred thousand dollars, while in 1917 it was increased to 
five hundred thousand dollars fully paid in. The officers are: Alexander MacLean, 
president and manager; H. E. White, vice president; and George R. Wood, secre- 
tary and treasurer, and these gentlemen, together with F. S. White and W. E. Coats, 
president of the Coats-Burchard Company, constitute the board of directors. All are 
active in the business with tlie exception of Mr. Coats. The directing spirit of the 
enterprise, however, has been Mr. INIacLean and his sound business judgment and 
initiative have brought notable results. 

In 1903 Mr. MacLean was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Grace Ramage, 
of Chesley, Ontario. Fraternally he is connected with Normal Park Lodge, A. F. 
& A. M., and in politics he maintains an independent course, voting according to the 
dictates of his judgment rather than according to party ties. He belongs to the 
Chicago Retail Druggists Association and he occupies a central place on the stage 
of activity. His ability has brought him prominently to the front and his enterprise 
has been a factor in commercial development in his adopted city. 



FREDERIC ADRIAN DELANO. 

Although born at Hong Kong, China, Semptember 10, 1863, the ancestral records 
of Frederic A. Delano are connected with the early colonial history of America. 
His parents Avere Warren Delano and Catherine Robbins Lyman, both natives of 
Massachusetts. Warren Delano, a tea merchant, was engaged in China trade and 
spent over thirty years of his life in China. He was a member of the firm of Rus- 
sell & Company, having houses in all the principal cities of the empire. In 1867 
he retired from active business life and returning to America made his home at 
Newburgh, New York, on the Hudson, until his death, which occurred in 1899, at 
the age of ninety years. On the paternal side his ancestors were French Hugue- 
nots and English pilgrims, the latter settling near Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 
the early colonization of that section of the country. The American progenitor of 
the Delano family was Philippe de Lannoy, who came from Leyden, Holland, on 
the ship Fortune, in 1621 and settled at Plymouth. From him Frederic A. Delano 
is a direct descendant in the seventh generation, the line being through Jonathan 
(2), Thomas (3,), Ephraim (1), Warren (5), Warren (6) and Frederic A. (7). 
Through intermarriage he is also connected with many of the oldest families of 
New England, among whom are those of Church, Warren, Allerton, Cushman, 
Hathaway and Swift. On the maternal side Mr. D'elano comes of English and 
Scotch lineage, his ancestors in that line settling at Boston and Salem at various 
periods between 1630 and 1700. His mother, who was a native of Northampton, 
Massachusetts, and a member of a well known family, was a representative of the 
seventh generation of descendants of Jonathan Lyman, who came to America dur- 
ing the first half of the seventeenth century, and was also connected with the old 
Massachusetts families of Strong, Dwight, Hutchinson, Clark, Robbins and Mur- 
ray, including two of the early governors of that state. She died in 1897 at sev- 



318 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

enty-three years of age. Our subject was the tenth in a family of eleven children, 
of whom two sons and four daughters survive, all except Frederic A. residing in 
the east. 

Frederic A. Delano silent his boyhood days at Newburgh, New York, receiving 
his early education at Adams Academy, Quincy, Massachusetts. He graduated 
from Harvard College with degree of A. B. in 1885. Unlike many men of liberal 
college training, he did not regard his intellectual development as something op- 
posed to manual labor, but took up work of the latter character, imbued with strong 
purpose and laudable ambition, his thorough education enabling him to better direct 
his efforts. Soon after he had completed his University course he began his career 
in railroad work, and has devoted his entire life to that one field of endeavor. He 
first entered the service of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company, 
August 1, 1885, with an engineering party in Colorado. Two months later he 
entered the shops of the same road at Aurora, Illinois, as a machinist's apprentice, 
and in Aj^ril, 1887, was temporarily appointed acting engineer of tests at Aurora. 
He was next advanced to the position of assistant to the second vice president at 
Chicago, in April, 1889, then to superintendent of freight terminals at Chicago, 
in July, 1890, and to superintendent of motive power at Chicago, February 1, 1899. 
On July 1, 1901, Mr. Delano was made general manager of the Chicago, Burlington 
& Quincy Railroad, which position he held until January 10, 1905, when lie re- 
signed to engage in general consulation work. For a short time he was consulting 
engineer to the war department in relation to railroads in the Philipj^ine Islands. 
May 1, 1905, Mr. Delano became identified with the Wabash system as president 
of the Wheeling & Lake Erie Railroad Company and the Wabash-Pittsburgh-Ter- 
minal Railway, and vice president of the Wabash Railroad Company. Six months 
later, on October 5, 1905, he became president of the latter. 

There is no position that demands such careful systematization, such accuracy, 
such harmonious working as railway management. Time and effort and purpose 
must coincide and with perfect adjustment must reach the results that are to be 
attained. Understanding every department of railway management and operation 
as the result of over a quarter of a century's experiences in its different depart- 
ments, Mr. Delano brings to the management of the Wabash railroad the keenest 
discrimination, the most practical efforts and the most progressive and far-sighted 
IDolicy. He has also been the chairman of the board of directors of the Metropol- 
itan West Side Elevated Railroad Company, of Chicago, and is interested in various 
other enterprises. He is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, 
the American Institute of Mining Engineers, the Western Society of Engineers, 
American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Franklin Institute, the 
American Master ^Mechanics' Association, and the American Master Car Builders' 
Association. He served as president of the American Railway Association from 
1907 to 1909 and also of the Western Railway- Club for one term. He has served 
as a member of the board of overseers of Harvard College, and as president of the 
board of directors of the Chicago Lying-in Hospital. 

Mr. Delano has taken a keen interest in civic affairs and has served as president 
of the Chicago Commercial Club. He is a member of the Chicago Plan Commis- 
sion of the city, and has been prominently identified with the movement which it 
represents, since its conception in 1907. While in political circles his efforts have 
been along the line of influence rather than of direct activity, he has served his 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AXD ITS BUILDERS 319 

city as a member of the Harbor Commission of the city of Chicago^ mider appoint- 
ment of Maj'or Busse, in January, 1908. 

Mr. Delano is a Unitarian in religious faith and vice president of the American 
Unitarian Association. He holds to liberal and charitable views while seeking to 
secure the adoption of standards that will work for higher manhood and better 
citizenship. He holds membership in the Chicago Club, the Union League, the 
University, the Chicago Literary, the Commercial, and other social clubs of Chi- 
cago, also of St. Louis and of Pittsburgh. 

On November 22, 1888, Mr. Delano was married, in Chicago, to Miss Matilda 
Peasley, daughter of J. C. Peasley. Five children have been born to them, of 
whom three are living, Catherine, Louise and Laura. The family residence is at 
510 Wellington avenue. 



EDWARD H. GRAHL. 



Edward H. Grahl is a member of the undertaking firm of Rohn & Grahl, 
proprietors of three different undertaking establishments of Chicago, in which con- 
nection they have developed a business of extensive and gratifying proportions. Mr. 
Grahl has spent his entire life in the city which is still his place of residence. He 
was born July 18, 1878, and is a son of Edward and Matilda Grahl, who arrived 
in Chicago in 1869. The father was a cooper by trade and made his home on 
Washburn avenue, near Ashland avenue. He was one of the early residents of 
that section of the city and there remained until 1911, when he removed to Oak 
Park, where he still makes his home. 

Edward H. Grahl pursued his education in parochial and public schools and 
on starting out in business entered the employ of the firm of Mandel Brothers, while 
subsequently he became connected with the Tobey Furniture Company. He after- 
ward engaged in the printing business and subsequently turned his attention to the 
undertaking business, entering into partnership with Henry Rohn in 1902. They 
opened an establishment on Ashland avenue, near Twelfth street, and in 1903 made 
a removal to No. 1244 Soutli Ashland boulevard, where they erected a building 
twenty-five by one hundred and fifty feet and three stories in height. There they 
conducted a horse livery business until 1911 in connection with their undertaking 
business but have since concentrated their attention upon the latter. In February 
of that year they opened undertaking parlors at No. 1121 South East avenue in Oak 
Park, where a building twenty-five by sixty-five feet and two stories in height was 
erected, containing a chapel with a seating capacity of forty people. A third 
branch was opened at No. 7232 West Madison street on the 20th of December, 1915, 
in a one-story building twenty-five by seventy-five feet, containing a chapel with 
a seating capacity for sixty. Mr. Grahl conducts the Ashland avenue store, Mr. 
Rohn managing the Oak Park establishment. 

On the 23d of June, 1905, Mr. Grahl was united in marriage to Miss Carrie 
Appelhans^ a native of New York and a daughter of Henry and Caroline Aj^pelhans. 
They have become the parents of two children, Lucile and Karl. 

Mr. Grahl belongs to the Plattdeutsche Gilde, No. 25. He also has membership 
in the Mutual Aid & Benefit Society No. 16 and in the International Tyijographical 



320 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

Union and his religious faith is that of the Lutheran church. Having always re- 
sided in Chicago, he is widely known, his business being of a character that has 
brought him a wide acquaintance, and the sterling worth of his character has gained 
for him many friends. 



OTTO L. SCHMIDT, M. D. 

Otto L. Schmidt, a physician of prominent professional and business connec- 
tions, with offices in the Mailers building, has for a quarter of a century continued 
in the practice of medicine in this, his native city. His parents came to Chicago 
in 1857, and it was here that Dr. Schmidt was born in 1863. After graduating 
from the Haven school, and afterwards from the Central high school, at that 
time on West Monroe street, in its last graduating class in 1880, he determined 
upon the practice of medicine as his life work and entered as a student the Chicago 
Medical College, which eventually became the Medical Department of the North- 
western University. On graduation there followed an interneship of two years in 
the Cook County Infirmary and the Alexian Brothers Hospital of Chicago. There- 
after he qualified for further professional duties by post-graduate work at Wiirz- 
burg and Vienna. Save for the period spent abroad in advanced studies, he was 
continuously engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery in Chicago since 
1883, and is today recognized as among the prominent of the medical profession. 
He is now physician to the Alexian Brothers Hospital and consulting physician 
to the Michael Reese and German Hospitals. For many years he has been con- 
nected with the Chicago Polyclinic as professor of internal medicine. He is a 
member of the Chicago Medical Society, the Chicago Academy of Medicine, the 
American Medical Association and the Chicago Society of Medical History. 
Dr. Schmidt is also active in man}'^ other social and charitable organizations. He 
is a trustee of the Chicago Historical Society, a trustee of the Illinois State His- 
torial Librarj^j president of the German American Historical Society of Illinois 
and counselor of the Illinois Historical Society. 



MILO GIFFORD KELLOGG. 

As one follows down the line of the inventors whose labors have given America 
preemanence in the field of commerce as the result of devices for saving time and 
labor, he reaches in the later period of invention the name of Milo Gifford Kellogg — 
a name largely synonymous with the telephonic history of the country. He was of 
the ninth generation of Kelloggs born in the United States and was a son of James 
Gregg and Sarah Jane (Gifford) Kellogg. The brancli of the Kellogg family came 
from Great Leighs, England, and mention of them is found in the records of Farm- 
ington, Connecticut, as early as 1651. The Giffords came from Barnstable county, 
Massachusetts, and also date back to colonial days. 

Milo Gifford Kellogg, born in Rodman. New York, April 14. 1819, attended the 
preparatory school at Fulton and continued Iiis studies in the Hungerford Collegiate 




MILO Ct. KELLOGG 



THE >'E\V YORK 

PUBLIC LiBRARY 



ASTOK. LENOX AND 
TILDEN FOLNlUTloN'S 

B ^ 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 323 

Institute at Adams, New York. In 1870 he was graduated from the University of 
Rochester, New York, which institution conferred upon him the degrees of A. B. 
and A. M. He was an Alpha Delta Phi of Rochester, and was one of three chosen 
by the society to inaugurate the fraternity chapter at Cornell University. 

Following his graduation Mr. Kellogg came to Chicago and entered into business 
with the firm of Gray & Barton, manufacturers of electrical apparatus, and saw the 
development of telephony and electrical illumination from their infancy. The 
Chicago Engineer in this connection once wrote: "Fancy this energetic trio of 
ambitious young men — Gray and Barton and Kellogg — all experimenting with 
electricity and making salable apparatus. Elisha Gray — Enos M. Barton — Milo 
Gifford Kellogg — makers of telephone history !" The firm of Gray & Barton in 
1872 became the Western Electric Manufacturing Company and prospered for the 
ten following years, when, in 1882, the word manufacturing was dropped from the 
title. During all of these years and until 1885 Mr. Kellogg remained with the 
concern and from 1875 was superintendent of the manufacturing dei^artment of the 
Western Electric Company. 

In the following year Mr. Kellogg became president of the Great Southern 
Telephone & Telegraph Company, so continuing until 1888. He was also one of the 
organizers and principal stockholders of the Central Union Telephone Company of 
Chicago and was a director in that company from 1893 until 1898. In the mean- 
time he traveled extensively, spending two years of the period in Europe. He 
strudied the possibilities of telephone devdo^jment, becoming identified with the 
operation of telephone plants and concentrating his energy on inventions. During 
this period he became a foimtain head of economical ideas, all pertaining to telephone 
work. He brought out numerous inventions and about one hundred and fifty of 
his patents formed part of the assets of the new company which he organized in 1897. 
It was in that year that he organized the Kellogg Switchboard & SuppW Company, 
of which he became president, a position he held at the time of his death. This 
company was the first to supply independent operating companies with multiple 
switchboards and was also the first to introduce the fuU-lampsignal switchboard to 
independent operators. It was in 1897 that the Kellogg Company built the first 
independent multiple switchboard for the Kinlock Company of St. Louis which was 
the first large city in the United States to successfully break away from the Bell 
monopoly. We quote again from the Engineer which said: "Milo Gifford Kellogg 
blazed the way for the independent telephone manufacturer. It was through his 
personal efforts in 1892 that President Benjamin Harrison considered the claims 
of independent manufacturers with reference to the Berliner transmitter patents. 
The government's case to annul the validity of Berliner's claim was not successful, 
but it established the weaknesses which made the subsequent trials a success. The 
contribution of largeness to the cause of competitive telephony lies at the door of 
M. G. Kellogg, the man. The Kellogg manufacturing organization constitutes the 
best engineering and sales talent that is to be had. Little could have been added in 
men, plans or execution to secure greater success. Mr. Kellogg always addressed 
himself in earnest to the work before him. He surrounded himself with workers of 
like kind. The integrity and efficiency of the manufactured apparatus resulting 
from such organization has never been assailed." 

Mr. Kellogg devoted his time and energies to the advancement of telephone and 
electrical apparatus and during the last five years of his life mainta.Jtv>d a separate 

Vol. IV— 18 



324 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

organization for experimental -work, largely concentrating his efforts and energies 
upon automatic teleplione operating and manufacturing. 

On the nth of March, 1873^ Mr. Kellogg was united in mariage to Marj' Frances, 
a daughter of Calvin and Frances (Kimball) De Wolf, both of whom were early 
settlers of Chicago, her father arriving in 1837 and her mother in 1840. They were 
married in this city by the Rev. Hooper Crews one of the early pastors of the Clark 
street Methodist church, on the 9th of June, IS^l. Extended mention of them is 
made on another page of this volume. To Mr. and jNIrs. Kellogg were born three 
children, Anna Pearl, Leroy De Wolf and James Gifford. Both sons are connected 
with the Kellogg Switchboard & Supjaly Company and the former was married in 
July, 1901. to Ellen Neel and they have three children, namely: Frances De Wolf, 
Venie Louise and Leroy Gifford. 

Milo G. Kellogg passed away September 26, 1909. His family and friends 
were all the society he cared for and to them he was most loval and devoted. He 
attended the Kenwood Evangelical church and was always interested in its benevolent 
work. He had a firm belief in republican principles, although he at times found 
occasion to vote independently of the party ticket. He was a liberal supporter of 
the Municipal Voters' League, a life member of the Chicago Athletic Association 
and also a member of the Union League and Kenwood Clubs. He remains in the 
memory of his friends enshrined in a halo of a gracious presence and kindly spirit, 
and to the world he will ever be known as one whose efforts were foremost in the 
development of telephonj^ not only through invention and manufacture but also in 
the establishment of an independent system that broke the power of a monopoly. 



EDWARD I. HARTY. 



Edward I. Harty, who since 1912 has been engaged in the undertaking business, 
his establishment being located at No. 3712 Ogden avenue, was born in Chicago 
on the 17th day of May, 1885, and is a son of James P. and Margaret (Kennedy) 
Harty. The father was born in Ireland, while the mother's birth occurred in New 
York city, and in early life both arrived in Chicago, where they were married. The 
father devoted his attention throughout his active business career to the manufacture 
of sash and doors but lived retired from 1909 until his death, which occurred in 1911. 

Edward I. Harty on arriving at school age became a pupil in the public schools 
and also attended private schools, in this way acquiring a thorough English educa- 
tion. After his textbooks were put aside and his schooldays were over he became 
the active assistant of his father in the sash and door business, with which he was 
connected for three years. On the expiration of that period he devoted two years 
to the talking machine business and since 1912 he has been engaged in the under- 
taking business on his own account. He has long been interested in the work of un- 
dertaking, having acted as helper to the firm of Flood Brothers in his boyhood, 
that firm being located in his home neighborhood. He pursued a course at the Barnes 
School of Embalming in 1906 and in that year received state license No. 2029. He 
afterward entered the undertaking business of the firm of Hales & Harty as manager, 
the partners in the company being Ernest G. Hales and James A. Harty. the lat- 
ter a brother oC Edward I. Harty. Eventually the junior partner sold out to Mr. 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 325 

Hales and on the 2d of January, 1907, Harty Brothers opened an undertaking 
business at No. 3712 Ogden avenue, where they have remained^ although the brother 
is not active in the business at the present time, leaving the management to Edward 
I. Harty. They occupy a building twenty-five by sixty feet and containing a chaiDel 
seating one hundred. Mr. Harty has a thorough understanding of every phase of 
the undertaking business and his interests are capably and scientifically conducted, 
for he keeps in touch with all modern methods and processes. 

On the 17th of October, 1916, Mr. Harty was united in marriage to Miss May 
Finn, a native of Chicago. They are communicants of the Blessed Sacrament Catholic 
church, in the work of which Mr. Harty takes an active and helpful interest. He 
is also identified with the Knights of Columbus, the Catholic Order of Foresters, the 
National Union and the Modern Woodmen of America. In politics he is independent. 
He belongs to the Cliicago Undertakers Association and also to the Chicago Motor 
Liverymen's Association. Energetic and enterprising, he carries forward to success- 
ful completion whatever he undertakes and his well directed energies and his thrift 
have brought him the substantial measure of success which is today his. 



A. E. ZUBER. 



Closely studying every possibility opened in the natural ramifications of trade, 
A. E. Zuber became one of the organizers of the Chicago Wholesale Drug Company, 
which was established May 1, 1909, and he was made chairman of its board of 
directors. He has since concentrated his efforts and attention upon the business, 
which under his guidance has developed to extensive proportions. Mr. Zuber is a 
native of Olney, Illinois. He was born on the 3d of September, 1867, and in his 
native city acquired a public school education, after which he made his initial step 
in the business world in connection with general merchandising. He remained a 
resident of Olney until 1892, when he removed to Chicago and became identified 
with trade interests in this city as proprietor of a drug store at the corner of Fifty- 
first street and Wentworth avenue. He has since conducted the business and as the 
years have passed he has won success in his undertakings and broadened the scope 
of his labors. He became one of the organizers of the Chicago W^holesale Drug 
Company and is now its president. As stated, this was established on the 1st of 
May, 1909, and Mr. Zuber was then made chairman of its board of directors, while 
Mathew White became manager, the latter being for some years the local organizer 
of the Chicago Retail Druggists Association. In 1912 the Mutual Drug Company 
of Cleveland, Ohio, purchased the controlling interest in the stock, so that the 
Chicago Wholesale Drug Company is now a branch of the ^Mutual. At that time 
Mr. Zuber was made the president and has been active in that connection since, 
with R. B. Crowell, Jr., as general manager. The company had its first location on 
Wabash avenue, near Harrison street, whence in 1912 a removal was made to 115 
West Harrison street. The business utilizes three floors of a large building, one 
hundred by one hundred and twelve feet, and the company has doubled its business 
every year for the past five years. It is a cooperative company with a druggists' 
membership of nearly nine hundred in Wisconsin, Illinois, Iowa, Indiana and 
Michigan. It discounts all bills and handles ninety-five per cent of the goods needed 



326 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

by the drug stores affiliated therewith. It largely concentrates upon the handling of 
staple goods and through this method there is a large saving to the members. The 
stock is owned by the retail druggists and the active management of the business 
is in the hands of men who are engaged in the drug trade. The company does no 
credit business and, jDurchasing for cash, is able to sell at a very low figure. As 
president of the company Mr. Zuber has largely promoted its interests and has con- 
tributed much to its success. 

In 1895 Mr. Zuber was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Messier, of Chicago, 
and to them have been born three children: Eugene, Frank and Florence. Mr. 
Zuber belongs to the Chicago Retail Druggists Association and for several years 
served as a member of its executive board. He is also a member of the National 
Association of Retail Druggists and for three terms was on its executive board. 
He has ever been deeply interested in the profession, its development and the main- 
tenance of its highest standards, and his efforts have been so directed that they have 
constituted a contributing factor to success and progress in that field. 



JOHN T. CHRASTKA. 



John T. Chrastka, engaged in the undertaking business, was born in Bohemia, 
May 30, 1882, a son of Jacob Chrastka, who came with his family to Chicago in 
1 892. The mother is now deceased, while the father has retired from active business. 
John T. Chrastka pursued his education in parochial and public schools of Chicago, 
where he arrived when a little lad of ten years. He started to work in a leather 
goods factory, where he was employed for two years and afterward became con- 
nected with the printing business, learning the trade. Three years later he was 
advanced to the position of manager of a printing house but was ambitious to en- 
gage in business on his own account and later established a livery barn on Twelfth 
street, near Ashland avenue. It was not a far step from that line to the undertaking 
business and in 1909 he was graduated from the Chicago Post Graduate School of 
Embalming. He had previously done work for Wolf's undertaking establishment 
and on the 10th of July, 1909, he received a state license. For a time he did em- 
balming for the trade but in February, 1910, opened an undertaking establishment 
at No. 3410 West Twenty-sixth street, and when he paid his first month's rent he had 
but fifteen dollars remaining. That he has prospered in the interval is indicated 
in the fact that in November, 1916, he opened a branch house at Twenty-second 
street and Fifty-sixth avenue in Cicero and has the largest business in his section 
of the city. He now owtis three limousine cars. His store is twenty-five by forty- 
five feet and contains a chapel with a seating capacity of one hundred. The Cicero 
store is of equal size and is beautifully decorated. Both places are artistic, with art 
glass finish and beautiful appointments. Mr. Chrastka belongs to the Chicago 
Undertakers Association and also to the Chicago Motor Liverymen's Association. 

In February, 1910, Mr. Chrastka was married to ]Miss Lillian Martinek, of 
Chicago, and to them have been born two children, John T. and Alice. Fraternally 
Mr. Chrastka is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, with the 
Knights of Pythias, the National Union, the Modern Woodmen and the Woodmen of 
the World and he is also identified with six Bohemian orders. He is likewise a 



. CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 327 

member of the Twenty-sixth Street Business Men's Association, an organization 
formed to advance the business conditions in that section of the city, and add to 
general progress and improvement there. In politics he maintains an independent 
course. He does not care to ally himself with any party, but casts his vote for the 
men whom he thinks best qualified to fill the offices which they seek. 

Mr. Chrastka deserves much credit for what he has accomplished, as he has 
worked his way steadily upward through persistency of purpose and indefatigable 
energy, and as the years have gone by he has come into possession of a comfortable 
competence which is the direct reward of his persistency of purpose and indefatigable 
effort intelligently applied. 



CHARLES FREDERICK GUNTHER. 

Only in name does Charles F. Gunther give indication of his German birth and 
parentage, for he is distinctively American in thought and interests. This does 
not mean that he does not feel a love for the land of his nativity and, indeed, he 
is recognized as a man of the widest catholicity of spirit, to whom all peoples are 
a subject of interest and all history a field for research. To characterize Mr, 
Gunther and his life work in a single sentence is impossible, for his interests are 
of a most broad, and varied nature, and while he can give sage advice to the young 
man starting in business, for he carved out for himself the path to success, he can 
speak with equal authority concerning ancient civilization and modern scientific 
investigations. While he has traveled broadly, he has made Chicago his home 
since 1863, and it is in this city that his commercial activities have centered. The 
beautiful town of Wildberg, in the midst of the celebrated Black Forest district 
of Germany, was his birthplace, and the date March 6, 1837. He was, however, 
only six years of age when his parents came to the United States with their family, 
arriving at New York after a voyage of fifty-two days from the port of Havre. 
The family home was established in Lancaster county and later in Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania, and after pursuing his education in the public schools there, Charles 
F. Gunther began carrying government mail over a route of forty miles to Johns- 
town and return on horseback for the meager wage of twenty-five cents per day. 
Since the spring of 1850, however, he has been identified with the middle west, 
for in that year the family removed to Peru, Illinois, and he there had opportunity 
to continue his education as well as to advance in business training and competency. 
In his youthful days he became a clerk in a drug store and to some extent read medi- 
cine. He was also at one time an employe in the postoffice at Peru and afterward 
became connected as the local correspondent with the famous Chicago bank of 
George Smith & Company. He seemed in this connection to have found a task suited 
to his abilities, for he worked his way steadily upward and after a few years was 
made cashier of the institution. However, he severed his connection with the 
bank to enter the service of Bohlen, Wilson & Company at Memphis, Tennessee. 
They were conducting the most extensive ice business in the south, obtaining their 
source of supply at Peru, Illinois. Residing below the Mason and Dixon line and 
being brought, by the impressment of his firm's resources and steamers, in the 
natural course of circumstances, to the cause of the Confederacy, he entered tlie 



328 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

Confederate navy service as a steward and purser, purchasing sujiplies and trans- 
jDorting troops along all the southern rivers tributary to the Mississippi. x\t length 
the Union troops obtained possession of Memphis and New Orleans and blockaded 
the steamer upon which Mr. Gunther was serving and that had escaped up the 
Arkansas river, and the steamers were burned by the Union troops. A year later 
he was captured in line of battle in a cavalry charge where the others were placed 
to arrest the advance of the Union troops, while he was made a prisoner of war. 
Soon afterward, however, he was released and returned to his old home in Peru. 
Later he accepted a position in a Peoria bank and his next change in business con- 
nection brought him to Chicago as the first traveling salesman out of this city into 
southern territory for the confectionery house of C. W. Sanford. He traveled 
over Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, West Virginia and Kentucky and while thus em- 
ployed made his first trip to Europe. He afterward became an employe of Thomp- 
son, Johnson & ComjDany, wholesale grocers of Chicago, and later became the 
Chicago representative of Greenfield, Young & Company, leading New York con- 
fectioners. In the fall of 1868 he opened a retail business on his own account on 
Clark street and thus established the first high-grade store of the kind in the city, 
and for many years thereafter his establishment set the standard for kindred under- 
takings. It was Mr. Gunther who first introduced the caramel, one of the most 
notable of the American confections. In the great conflagration of 1871 his store 
was destroyed, but with notable energy and determination he resumed the busi- 
ness and on State street built up an enterprise second to none in Chicago and with 
few parallels in the country. Until recently he has remained proprietor of this 
establishment, which has become a synonym to Chicago residents and visitors of 
all that is attractive and artistic in the way of equipment and of purity in the matter 
of the product. Not only have the confectionery and restaurant departments been 
kept up to the highest standard, but patrons of the store have had an object lesson in 
history, in the rare and almost priceless portraits and works of art which there 
adorn the walls. 

Originality has always characterized the business methods of Mr. Gimther, 
who in fact has manifested the spirit of the pioneer in formulating and executing 
original plans for the development of his commercial interests. Many of the sup- 
posed up-to-date ideas prevailing among Chicago retail merchants at the present 
time were introduced into the city by him and utilized by him many years ago. In 
fact he has set the standard which many have followed. He was the first merchant in 
Chicago to advertise in the local news space of the daily journals when all other 
matter of that character was found in the advertising columns. He realized how 
quickly and effectively such advertising would be brought to the attention of readers 
and thus he instituted a plan that has since been widely adopted. He was the first 
merchant in Chicago to introduce advertising novelties. More than thirty years ago 
the unique and novel, as well as artistic character of the Gunther advertisements was 
as distinctive as the superior quality of the product. Many of these novelties were 
brought from Europe by Mr. Gunther and while not originally manufactured for 
that purpose, he readily understood how this use could be made of them and, add- 
ing his name and business address, sent these out to make known to the city and 
the country at large the progressive methods of Chicago's foremost confectioner. 
In the management and direction of his business he was very systematic. No 
detail was regarded as too unimportant to claim his notice and, moreover, he knew 



CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 329 

the duties of almost every employe and knew when they were being properly dis- 
charged. A man of great energy and wonderful capacity for work, he not only 
founded and conducted the extensive manufacturing and mercantile interests with 
which his name was so long associated but even now, at the age of seventy-five 
years, when success is his, sufficient to enable him to put aside business cares, he 
gives his personal attention to the management of his extensive private interests 
and acts as president and active manager of the Gunther Confection and Chocolate 
Company, the business which he founded, and which is one of the best known con- 
cerns in its line in Chicago. 

Long recognized as the leader in his line and as a most successful merchant, 
it has followed as a logical sequence that Mr. Gunther hds taken an active part in 
affairs of public moment, improvement and upbuilding of the city. A remarkable 
coincident in the life of Mr. Gunther and the history of the city of his successes 
is the fact that he was born the same year, month, week and within the same two 
days, in 1837, that Chicago was incorporated. One of the leaders of the Chicago 
democracy and with firm belief in the democratic principle of equal rights to all 
and special privileges to none, believing also in the tariff for revenue only, which 
has long been one of the strong planks in the democratic platform, he has neverthe- 
less eschewed public office, desiring no such recognition of his party fealty. How- 
ever, his fellow citizens have twice called him to the city council and in 1901 he 
was elected city treasurer, in which position his administration was characterized 
by the same business-like and energetic spirit that has gained him prominence and 
leadershijD in commercial circles. 

In 1869 Mr. Gunther was married to Miss Jennie Burnell, of Lima, Indiana, 
and unto them were born two sons, Burnell and Whitman, the latter of whom is 
now deceased. Both Mr. and Mrs. Gunther have long been identified with organ- 
izations for the promotion of Chicago's welfare, and he has ever wielded a wide 
influence for progress and improvement. It is true that his chief life work has been 
that of a remarkably successful manufacturer and merchant, but the range of his 
activities and the scope of his influence has reached far beyond that special field 
and he belongs to that public-spirited, useful and helpful type of men whose ambi- 
tions are centered and directed in those channels through which flows the greatest 
and most permanent good to the greatest number. 

Chicago owes to Mr. Gunther a debt of gratitude which can never be repaid 
for what he has done in bringing to the city and placing upon exhibition works of 
art, relics and historical treasures, which visibly teach the history and progress of 
the world. Speaking German, French and Spanish as well as English, Mr. Gunther 
has been able to personally conduct his investigations in foreign fields. For many 
years he had above his store what was in many respects one of the finest museums 
of the country. His success has enabled him to indulge his love for historic re- 
search to the fullest extent and he has been most generous in allowing others to 
benefit by the collections that he has gathered, collections of manuscript, historic 
volumes and portraits as well as relics of all the American wars from colonial times 
down to the late Spanish-American war. His treasures comprise manuscripts of the 
most ancient writings of the world, from the stone rolls of the Assyrian and the 
Babylonian periods and the papyrus parchments of the Pharaohs, to the present 
time. He undoubtedly possesses the rarest collection of Bibles in America, includ- 
ing a copy of the New Testament -printed in English (1528) ; all of the first Bibles 



330 CHICAGO: ITS HISTORY AND ITS BUILDERS 

printed in Europe and on the American continent, such as the Elliott Indian Bibles 
and the Martha Washington Bible and the first American Bible by Atkinson in 
1782. The famous Gunther manuscripts include a well authenticated and very 
rare autograph of Shakespeare, and a Moliere and original manuscripts of Goethe, 
Schiller, Tasso, Michael Angelo, Galileo, Raphael and many other famous charac- 
ters of Europe and America — memorials direct from the hands of noted writers, 
poets, musicians, clergj'men, politicians and monarchs. In his galleries are the 
original manuscripts of Star Spangled Banner; Home, Sweet Home; Auld Lang 
Syne; Old Grimes; Lead Kindly Light; and many others. Among the maps are 
the earliest ones relating to America from 1500 up, and the first edition of Martin 
Waldseemueller's Cosmography, 1507, which for the first time gives the name Amer- 
ica to the new world. Of the Gunther portraits perhaps the most famous is that 
of Columbus by Sir Antonio Moro, painted about 1552 from a miniature, then form- 
ing a part of the historic museum in the Prado Palace, in Madrid, Spain. Wash- 
ington Irving, who thoroughly searched the archives of Spain, pronounced this the 
best and truest portrait of Columbus extant. The collection also contains seven- 
teen original portraits of Washington, including the first ever made of him by the 
elder Peale, and the only portrait in existence of Washington's sister Betty and 
her husband, including the two last portraits of George and Martha Washington 
by Saint Memen. The relics of George Washington cover his entire career, and 
the department of Americana includes also rare memorials of Abraham Lincoln 
and all other great historic characters. In addition to all this Mr. Gunther was 
instrumental in bringing to Chicago the priceless exhibit of Civil war relics. In 
the late '80s he was the prime factor in the movement to transport Libby prison 
from Richmond, Virginia, to this city, and within its historic walls installed the 
war museum, acting as president of the Museum Association during its existence 
and later becoming president of the company that erected upon the former museum 
site the now famous Coliseum. In 1912 Mr. Gunther erected the Gunther build- 
ing on the northwest corner of South Wabash avenue and Harmon court. 

Mr. Gunther is not only democratic in principle— of the Jefferson and low tariff 
democracy — but in spirit, is one of the most approachable and genial of men, and 
his unfeigned cordiality has gained for him a circle of friends almost coextensive 
w